BMW’s Apple CarPlay Annual Fee Is Next-Level Gouging

Saturday, January 20, 04:29 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Tim Stevens, writing for CNet: Instead of a one-time, $300 fee, starting on 2019 models BMW will charge $80 annually for the privilege of accessing Apple’s otherwise totally free CarPlay service. You do get the first year free, much like your friendly neighborhood dealer of another sort, but after that it’s pay up or have your Lightning cable metaphorically snipped. On the surface this is pretty offensive, and it seemed like something must be driving this. The offic

The Apple Cash FAQ

Saturday, January 20, 03:48 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Horace Dediu: As individuals we think that having lots of cash makes us rich. For companies it’s the opposite. Cash is a liability. If you come across a company that is cash rich and has nothing else, its enterprise value will be zero. Companies are valued on their future cash flows, meaning their ability to generate cash, not how much they managed to keep. In other words, cash is a measure of past success and investors are interested only in future value. That future value comes fr

The Ressence Type 2 E-Crown Concept

Saturday, January 20, 02:43 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Stephen Pulvirent, writing for Hodinkee: Working with Tony Fadell (who you might know as the designer of the iPod, the founder of Nest, and a noted Talking Watches guest), Ressence has gone a few steps further than anyone else thinking in this direction. The idea is that you initially set the Type 2 e-Crown Concept using the mechanical mechanism on the watch’s rear, and then you never need to touch

Bad Design in Action: The False Hawaiian Ballistic Missile Alert

Saturday, January 20, 02:26 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jason Kottke: Hopefully this, uh, “redesign” is temporary and a full overhaul is in the works. That menu is a really dangerous bit of interface design and adding an “oopsie, we didn’t mean it button” doesn’t help. The employee made a mistake but it’s not his fault and he shouldn’t be fired for it. The interface is the problem and whoever caused that to happen — the designer, the software vendor, the heads of the agency, the lawmakers who haven’t made sufficient

Serverless WebSockets with AWS Lambda & Fanout

Saturday, January 20, 00:23 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Die With Me: $1 Chat App That Only Works When You Have Less Than 5 Percent Battery Remaining

Friday, January 19, 21:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

What a stupid, silly idea. I love it. ★

What Did CES Have To Offer? A Maker’s Overview Of The Coolest Gadgets And Tech!

Friday, January 19, 21:31 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Evergreen Diary #7: Syncing and Immediate and Deferrable Actions

Friday, January 19, 21:29 UTC @ inessential.com

There are, as I mentioned previously, two types of syncable actions: immediate and deferrable. An immediate action is something like adding a feed: it requires that the server is reachable right now, so that the feed actually gets added. A deferrable action is something like marking articles as read. The sooner the server knows, the better, sure — but it can wait if necessary. It ca

Tim Carmody on the Demise of The Awl and Hairpin

Friday, January 19, 20:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Tim Carmody, writing at Kottke.org: The Awl should have been the model for a new generation of sites that all outlived it. It wasn’t. We would mourn it less if there were more new blogs, staffed by hands young and old, rising to succeed it, jockeying to become required reading. Right now, there aren’t. But who knows? There is still plenty of time.

Open Letters: Dean Allen on His Mother’s Wedding

Friday, January 19, 20:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Open Letters was a site that ran in the latter half of 2000. Contributions were from anyone. There were small, collaborative projects like Open Letters all over the web back then. It was good. Dean Allen’s letter was great: Dear Dad, So Mom got married yesterday. It was in a park, amid some lurid autumn trees. The ceremony was performed with the river and the mountains in the background, and the whole affair was small, and nice, and stress-free. Unforced. Fo

Member of the Band – Edwin Retana Sr. Web Developer

Friday, January 19, 20:15 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Edwin Retana Sr. Web Developer appeared first on

Jason Kottke on Dean Allen

Friday, January 19, 19:40 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Lovely remembrance from Jason Kottke: Weirdly, or maybe not, my two biggest memories of Dean involve food. One of my favorite little pieces of writing by him (or anyone else for that matter), is How to Cook Soup. One of my favorites from Dean as well.

Happiness Hack: Don’t Model Your Adult Friendships After Sitcoms

Friday, January 19, 18:46 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

The Case For Never-Ending Cryptocurrency Arbitrage Spreads

Friday, January 19, 18:45 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Your CLI Tool Should be a Server (Maybe)

Friday, January 19, 18:44 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

LuLu: An open-source macOS firewall that blocks unknown outgoing connections

Friday, January 19, 18:31 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 329# Comments: 129

Swift Forums Now Open!

Friday, January 19, 18:00 UTC @ Swift.org

We are delighted to announce that the Swift project has completed the process of migrating to the Swift Forums as the primary method for discussion and communication! The former mailing lists have been shut down and archived, and all mailing list content has been imported into the new forum system. The following @swift.org email lists will continue to function as before:

Currying in JS

Friday, January 19, 17:41 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Going Global with Your Startup

Friday, January 19, 15:38 UTC @ Y Combinator

It’s worth thinking fairly early on about what it means to have international customers, partners, employees, and offices, and what kinds of international growth and infrastructure to invest in. Here are five things that come up in many of the conversations I have with other startup founders about international issues.

Simpler Math Tames the Complexity of Microbe Networks

Friday, January 19, 15:30 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

The dizzying network of interactions within microbe communities can defy analysis. But a new approach simplifies the math and makes progress possible.

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 19 January 2018

Friday, January 19, 15:01 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Happy Friday --we've had quite a week! Let's take a look at what happened: Support Apache –help offset the ASF's day-to-day operating expenses. Every dollar counts. - The Apache Software Foundation Receives Bitcoin Donation from Pineapple Fund Valued at $1M https://... ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Ne

List of oldest companies: Before 1300

Friday, January 19, 14:53 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 335# Comments: 183

GDPR and the right to be forgotten

Friday, January 19, 14:47 UTC @ John D. Cook

General Data Protection Regulation The European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) was adopted in 2016 and becomes enforceable in May of this year. Article 17 mandates a right to erasure, more commonly called the right to be forgotten. A right to be forgotten is tricky. It’s not immediately clear what this means or to what […]

Programming Notes for Professionals books

Friday, January 19, 14:19 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 411# Comments: 57

Homebrew 1.5.0

Friday, January 19, 10:59 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 253# Comments: 77

Laws of UX

Friday, January 19, 09:46 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 329# Comments: 172

An Amazon Order Might Lock You Out of Trusted Traveler Programs

Friday, January 19, 07:09 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 268# Comments: 198

Trial of a blood test that detects eight common forms of cancer

Friday, January 19, 05:49 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 264# Comments: 93

U.S. tests nuclear power system to sustain astronauts on Mars

Friday, January 19, 05:13 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 252# Comments: 119

Reality has a surprising amount of detail (2017)

Friday, January 19, 05:07 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 482# Comments: 250

Is it time for open processors?

Friday, January 19, 04:26 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 473# Comments: 191

★ Dean Allen

Friday, January 19, 02:58 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Make haste slowly.

A Simple Algorithm for Computing a Cycle Separator. (arXiv:1709.08122v2 [cs.CG] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

We present a linear time algorithm for computing a cycle separator in a planar graph that is (arguably) simpler than previously known algorithms. Our algorithm builds on, and is somewhat similar to, previous algorithms for computing separators. The main new ingredient is a specific layered decomposition of the planar graph constructed differently from previous BFS-based layerings.

Curves in $\mathbb{R}^4$ and two-rich points. (arXiv:1512.05648v2 [math.CO] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

We obtain a new bound on the number of two-rich points spanned by an arrangement of low degree algebraic curves in $\mathbb{R}^4$. Specifically, we show that an arrangement of $n$ algebraic curves determines at most $C_\epsilon n^{4/3+3\epsilon}$ two-rich points, provided at most $n^{2/3+2\epsilon}$ curves lie in any low degree hypersurface and at most $n^{1/3+\epsilon}$ curves lie in any low degree surface. This result follows from a structure theorem about arrangements of curves that determine many two

XSAT of Linear CNF Formulas. (arXiv:1711.07474v2 [cs.CC] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

Open questions with respect to the computational complexity of linear CNF formulas in connection with regularity and uniformity are addressed. In particular it is proven that any l-regular monotone CNF formula is XSAT-unsatisfiable if its number of clauses m is not a multiple of l. For exact linear formulas one finds surprisingly that l-regularity implies k-uniformity, with m = 1 + k(l-1)) and allowed k-values obey k(k-1) = 0 (mod l). Then the computational complexity of the class of monotone exact linea

On the Scalability of the GPUexplore Explicit-State Model Checker. (arXiv:1801.05857v1 [cs.DC])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

The use of graphics processors (GPUs) is a promising approach to speed up model checking to such an extent that it becomes feasible to instantly verify software systems during development. GPUexplore is an explicit-state model checker that runs all its computations on the GPU. Over the years it has been extended with various techniques, and the possibilities to further improve its performance have been continuously investigated. In this paper, we discuss how the hash table of the tool works, which is at

Nondeterminisic Sublinear Time Has Measure 0 in P. (arXiv:1801.05884v1 [cs.CC])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

The measure hypothesis is a quantitative strengthening of the P != NP conjecture which asserts that NP is a nonnegligible subset of EXP. Cai, Sivakumar, and Strauss (1997) showed that the analogue of this hypothesis in P is false. In particular, they showed that NTIME[n^{1/11}] has measure 0 in P. We improve on their result to show that the class of all languages decidable in nondeterministic sublinear time has measure 0 in P. Our result is based on DNF width and holds for all four major notions of measu

Gelly-Scheduling: Distributed Graph Processing for Network Service Placement in Community Networks. (arXiv:1703.10446v2 [cs.DC] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Community networks (CNs) have seen an increase in the last fifteen years. Their members contact nodes which operate Internet proxies, web servers, user file storage and video streaming services, to name a few. Detecting communities of nodes with properties (such as co-location) and assessing node eligibility for service placement is thus a key-factor in optimizing the experience of users. We present a novel solution for the problem of service placement as a two-phase approach, based on: 1) community find

Distributed $(\Delta+1)$-Coloring in Sublogarithmic Rounds. (arXiv:1603.01486v4 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We give a new randomized distributed algorithm for $(\Delta+1)$-coloring in the LOCAL model, running in $O(\sqrt{\log \Delta})+ 2^{O(\sqrt{\log \log n})}$ rounds in a graph of maximum degree~$\Delta$. This implies that the $(\Delta+1)$-coloring problem is easier than the maximal independent set problem and the maximal matching problem, due to their lower bounds of $\Omega \left( \min \left( \sqrt{\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}}, \frac{\log \Delta}{\log \log \Delta} \right) \right)$ by Kuhn, Moscibroda, and W

A Generalization of the Minisum and Minimax Voting Methods. (arXiv:1611.01364v2 [cs.GT] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this paper, we propose a family of approval voting-schemes for electing committees based on the preferences of voters. In our schemes, we calculate the vector of distances of the possible committees from each of the ballots and, for a given $ p $-norm, choose the one that minimizes the magnitude of the distance vector under that norm. The minisum and minimax methods suggested by previous authors and analyzed extensively in the literature naturally appear as special cases corresponding to $ p = 1 $ and

A universality theorem for allowable sequences with applications. (arXiv:1801.05992v1 [cs.CG])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

Order types are a well known abstraction of combinatorial properties of a point set. By Mn\"ev's universality theorem for each semi-algebraic set $V$ there is an order type with a realization space that is \emph{stably equivalent} to $V$. We consider realization spaces of \emph{allowable sequences}, a refinement of order types. We show that the realization spaces of allowable sequences are \emph{universal} and consequently deciding the realizability is complete in the \emph{existential theory of the real

Spectral norm and quantum speed-up. (arXiv:1612.08070v3 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

Understanding computational speed-up is fundamental for the development of efficient quantum algorithms. In this paper, we study such problem under the framework of the Quantum Query Model, which represents the probability of output $x \in \{0,1\}^n$ as a function $\pi(x)$, and denotes by $L(\pi)$ the spectral norm for $\pi$ defined over the Fourier basis of the linear space of functions $f: \left\{0,1\right\}^{n} \rightarrow \mathbb{R}$. We then present a classical simulation for output probabilities $\

Efficient Computation of the 8-point DCT via Summation by Parts. (arXiv:1801.05832v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

This paper introduces a new fast algorithm for the 8-point discrete cosine transform (DCT) based on the summation-by-parts formula. The proposed method converts the DCT matrix into an alternative transformation matrix that can be decomposed into sparse matrices of low multiplicative complexity. The method is capable of scaled and exact DCT computation and its associated fast algorithm achieves the theoretical minimal multiplicative complexity for the 8-point DCT. Depending on the nature of the input sign

The Asymptotic Capacity of Private Search. (arXiv:1801.05768v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

The private search problem is introduced, where a dataset comprised of $L$ i.i.d. records is replicated across $N$ non-colluding servers, each record takes values uniformly from an alphabet of size $K$, and a user wishes to search for all records that match a privately chosen value, without revealing any information about the chosen value to any individual server. The capacity of private search is the maximum number of bits of desired information that can be retrieved per bit of download. The asymptotic

Complexity of Combinations of Qualitative Constraint Satisfaction Problems. (arXiv:1801.05965v1 [math.LO])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

The CSP of a first-order theory $T$ is the problem of deciding for a given finite set $S$ of atomic formulas whether $T \cup S$ is satisfiable. Let $T_1$ and $T_2$ be two theories with countably infinite models and disjoint signatures. Nelson and Oppen presented conditions that imply decidability (or polynomial-time decidability) of $\mathrm{CSP}(T_1 \cup T_2)$ under the assumption that $\mathrm{CSP}(T_1)$ and $\mathrm{CSP}(T_2)$ are decidable (or polynomial-time decidable). We show that for a large clas

Nonuniform Reductions and NP-Completeness. (arXiv:1801.05882v1 [cs.CC])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

Nonuniformity is a central concept in computational complexity with powerful connections to circuit complexity and randomness. Nonuniform reductions have been used to study the isomorphism conjecture for NP and completeness for larger complexity classes. We study the power of nonuniform reductions for NP-completeness, obtaining both separations and upper bounds for nonuniform completeness vs uniform completeness in NP. Under various hypotheses, we obtain the following separations: 1. Ther

On Spectral Graph Embedding: A Non-Backtracking Perspective and Graph Approximation. (arXiv:1801.05855v1 [cs.SI])

Friday, January 19, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Graph embedding has been proven to be efficient and effective in facilitating graph analysis. In this paper, we present a novel spectral framework called NOn-Backtracking Embedding (NOBE), which offers a new perspective that organizes graph data at a deep level by tracking the flow traversing on the edges with backtracking prohibited. Further, by analyzing the non-backtracking process, a technique called graph approximation is devised, which provides a channel to transform the spectral decomposition on a

THE BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITY FOR BUILDING DECENTRALIZED BLOCKCHIAN APPLICATION

Friday, January 19, 00:43 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Our New Book: App Architecture (Early Access)

Friday, January 19, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

“Most writing about app architecture tries to sell you on a specific solution. We believe almost any architecture can work well, if applied correctly.” — Chris Eidhof Today, we’re pleased to announce early access to our new book, App Architecture — by Chris Eidhof, Matt Gallagher, and

Wearable Challenges

Thursday, January 18, 22:50 UTC @ joe cieplinski

Well, it’s finally come to this. After more than a year of walking around New York with my AirPods, I finally gave in and bought these silicon hooks from EarBuddyz to keep the darn things from slipping out of optimal sound position, or worse,

Getting free of toxic tech culture

Thursday, January 18, 22:43 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 203# Comments: 362

What could the future hold for HQ? A look at 2017’s most buzzed-about app

Thursday, January 18, 22:34 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Fed Up with Drug Companies, Hospitals Decide to Start Their Own

Thursday, January 18, 22:24 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 378# Comments: 235

CIA rendition flights from rustic North Carolina called to account by citizens

Thursday, January 18, 21:28 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 283# Comments: 157

Which Shore is the Right Shore? Onshore, Offshore or Nearshore Outsourcing?

Thursday, January 18, 21:21 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

There are lots of reasons to consider outsourcing software development projects. One is the shortage of talent in the United States. A booming economy, combined with a shortage of highly skilled web developers have created a tight labor market. Outsourced software development has not only become a necessity for keeping projects on track – but […] The post Which Shore is the Right

Building an Operating System for the Raspberry Pi

Thursday, January 18, 20:20 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 299# Comments: 76

Restructuring a giant, ancient codebase to make LibreOffice work well everywhere

Thursday, January 18, 20:17 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 460# Comments: 95

Ten Years' Worth of Learning About Pricing

Thursday, January 18, 19:39 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 223# Comments: 38

Bootstrap 4

Thursday, January 18, 18:42 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 216# Comments: 66

New Year, New Updates for Basecamp 3 on Android

Thursday, January 18, 18:21 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

A Sensitive Game

Thursday, January 18, 17:47 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Last month I posted about the sensitivity conjecture and today I would like to talk about an interesting game developed by Gilmer, Koucký and Saks and independently by Drucker that could yield a proof. Consider the following game on n bits among three players, Alice, Bob and Carol. The game works as follows: Carol pi

Scaling Kubernetes to 2,500 Nodes

Thursday, January 18, 17:41 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 262# Comments: 30

It is not possible to detect and block Chrome headless

Thursday, January 18, 17:37 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 348# Comments: 163

CryptoDogs: thoughts on Achain’s fork theory

Thursday, January 18, 17:20 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Wine 3.0 Released

Thursday, January 18, 16:47 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 699# Comments: 215

New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe, and more news from TED speakers

Thursday, January 18, 16:14 UTC @ TED Blog

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe. KIC 8462852 (often called “Tabby’s star,” after the astronomer Tabetha Boyajian, who led the first study of the star) intermittently dims as much as 22% and then brightens again, […

You don’t have to take every handout or jump through every loophole

Thursday, January 18, 15:52 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

A Neurobiologist Thinks Big — and Small

Thursday, January 18, 15:46 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

By developing new tools for visualizing subcellular structure and activity in molecular detail, Ed Boyden advances on his goal of understanding how the brain works.

A Founder’s Thoughts On Selling His Business | Hangout with Jason Eckenroth (Founder, ShipCompliant)

Thursday, January 18, 14:37 UTC @ Business of Software USA

3am in the morning – 5 hours to close. I felt the weight of 17 years of building a business all come down to this moment where I’d lost absolute, complete confidence that I was gonna make the right decision. Walking away from something I’d built for 17 years. It was my life. And I had […] The post A Founder’s Thoughts On Sellin

The Apache® Software Foundation Receives Bitcoin Donation from Pineapple Fund Valued at $1M

Thursday, January 18, 14:30 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Charitable donation helps underwrite the world's largest Open Source foundation, benefiting billions of users who depend on Apache's freely-available Open Source community-driven software. Forest Hill, MD —18 January 2018— The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today that it has received a 88.34 Bitcoin (BTC) donat

Most useful math class

Thursday, January 18, 13:43 UTC @ John D. Cook

A few years ago someone asked me what was my most useful undergraduate math class. My first thought was topology. I have never directly applied topology for a client. Nobody has ever approached me wanting to know, for example, whether two objects were in the same homotopy class. But I believe topology was one of […]

Human First, Everything Else Comes After | Dana Denis-Smith, Obelisk Support | BoS Europe 2017

Thursday, January 18, 10:21 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Dana Denis-Smith, Founder, Obelisk Support Consciously bootstrapped from day one, Dana focused early effort on building a community and creating a product that meets a market need. Early customers and clients were managed on spreadsheets, then a relatively primitive, off the shelf CRM system. She realised the critical piece in making the business successful was […] The post

Evergreen Diary #6: Proposed Sync Design

Thursday, January 18, 05:02 UTC @ inessential.com

Most of the time, a user will do a thing — mark some articles as read, for instance — and then Evergreen will tell the server (Feedbin, Feedly, etc.) right away. That’s good and easy. The hard part is this: what happens when the server is not reachable for some reason? Continuing the example: Evergreen could, in the case of the unreachable server, refuse to mark those articles as read. It could insist tha

Apple Shuttle Buses Rerouted Following Attacks

Thursday, January 18, 00:37 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jack Morse, reporting for Mashable: The tech giant runs shuttle buses full of employees from San Francisco to its headquarters in Cupertino every day, and, according to a source inside the company, someone is attacking those buses — and breaking windows. On an internal Apple email thread viewed by Mashable, one Apple employee speculated that the culprit may be firing “rubber rounds” at the buses. At least one of the buses only had the outer pane of its double-

Beyond Falsifiability

Thursday, January 18, 00:24 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Sean Carroll has a new paper out defending the Multiverse and attacking the naive Popperazi, entitled Beyond Falsifiability: Normal Science in a Multiverse. He also has a Beyond Falsifiability blog post here. Much of the problem with the paper and … Continue reading →

Apple to Create New Campus, Hire 20,000 New Employees

Wednesday, January 17, 19:53 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Apple: Apple expects to invest over $30 billion in capital expenditures in the US over the next five years and create over 20,000 new jobs through hiring at existing campuses and opening a new one. Apple already employs 84,000 people in all 50 states. The company plans to establish an Apple campus in a new location, which will initially house technical support for customers. The location of this new facility will be announced later in the year. Intriguing.

How do you fire someone well?

Wednesday, January 17, 19:52 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Gorgeous 50-Megapixel Panoramas Shot on an iPhone at 20,000 Feet

Wednesday, January 17, 19:49 UTC @ Daring Fireball

These shots are amazing — but I have to ask: why an iPhone 7? ★

Farhad Manjoo: ‘It’s Time for Apple to Build a Less Addictive iPhone’

Wednesday, January 17, 19:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

It’s time for Farhad Manjoo to write a less eye-roll-inducing column: Imagine if, once a week, your phone gave you a report on how you spent your time, similar to how your activity tracker tells you how sedentary you were last week. It could also needle you: “Farhad, you spent half your week scrolling through Twitter. Do you really feel proud of that?” It could offer to help: “If I notice you spending too much time on Snapchat next week, would you like me to remind you?”

The Quantum Spy

Wednesday, January 17, 19:23 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I don’t often read spy thrillers, but just finished one, The Quantum Spy, by David Ignatius. Ignatius is a well-known journalist at the Washington Post, specializing in international affairs and the intelligence community (and known to some as The Mainstream … Continue reading →

La física atmosférica de los pilares de luz

Wednesday, January 17, 18:31 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Los pilares de luz son un curioso fenómeno atmosférico causado por el reflejo de la luz de las farolas en cristales de hielo. Para que se observe el fenómeno los cristales de hielo tienen que estar alineados de forma […] Leer más La entrada

The Omni Show #6 with Liz Marley

Wednesday, January 17, 17:05 UTC @ inessential.com

This episode features Liz Marley, OmniGraffle engineer, formerly a tester and PM. She talks about switching from testing to writing code — and about how she came to do technical talks using Swift playgrounds. Playgrounds with ducks, that is, because every good playground has ducks.

To close or not to close

Wednesday, January 17, 14:52 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Pure Nerd Fun: The Grasshopper Problem

Wednesday, January 17, 13:26 UTC @ Backreaction

illustration of grasshopper.[image: awesomedude.com] It’s a sunny afternoon in July and a grasshopper lands on your lawn. The lawn has an area of a square meter. The grasshopper lands at a random place and then jumps 30 centimeters. Which shape must the lawn have so that the grasshopper is most likely to land on the lawn again after jumping? I know, sounds like one of these contrived but

Pure Nerd Fun: The Grasshopper Problem

Wednesday, January 17, 13:26 UTC @ Backreaction

illustration of grasshopper.[image: awesomedude.com] It’s a sunny afternoon in July and a grasshopper lands on your lawn. The lawn has an area of a square meter. The grasshopper lands at a random place and then jumps 30 centimeters. Which shape must the lawn have so that the grasshopper is most likely to land on the lawn again after jumping? I know, sounds like one of these contrived but

Alex Blumberg of Gimlet Media

Wednesday, January 17, 10:15 UTC @ Y Combinator

Alex Blumberg is the cofounder of Gimlet Media. Gimlet makes several podcasts you’ve probably heard of–StartUp, The Pitch, and Reply All are a few. Before Gimlet Alex worked on This American Life and Planet Money.

Cuasipartículas de masa negativa

Wednesday, January 17, 09:26 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Supongo que ya sabes que en una hoja de grafeno se propagan cuasipartículas de masa efectiva nula (ondas de electrones con una relación de dispersión lineal). En un hoja de diseleniuro de molibdeno suspendida en una microcavidad óptica se […] Leer más

[Sponsor] Aaptiv: #1 Audio Fitness App

Tuesday, January 16, 22:08 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Highly effective audio-based workouts by certified trainers paired with amazing music. Try for free. ★

Study: 42 Percent of Republicans Believe Accurate — but Negative — Stories Qualify as ‘fake News’

Tuesday, January 16, 21:26 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Erik Wemple: All those media-trust studies have a tendency toward the rote. Yes, we already knew that the public had little trust in the country’s journalistic organs. Yes, we knew that finding credible sources could be a harrowing pursuit for the public. Yes, we knew that an increasing portion of the U.S. public felt that the news was biased. Yet this nugget from a new Gallup-Knight Foundation survey just about knocked the Erik Wemple Blog out of a decade-long media-research

TED debuts “Small Thing Big Idea” original video series on Facebook Watch

Tuesday, January 16, 18:43 UTC @ TED Blog

Today we’re debuting a new original video series on Facebook Watch called Small Thing Big Idea: Designs That Changed the World. Each 3- to 4-minute weekly episode takes a brief but delightful look at the lasting genius of one everyday object – a pencil, for example, or a hoodie – and explains how it is so perfectly […]

The Basecamp 3 refresh is here!

Tuesday, January 16, 17:36 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Book Review: “The Dialogues” by Clifford Johnson

Tuesday, January 16, 16:56 UTC @ Backreaction

Clifford Johnson is a veteran of the science blogosphere, a long-term survivor, around already when I began blogging and one of the few still at it today. He is professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California (in LA). I had the pleasure of meeting Clifford in 2007. Who’d have thought back then that 10 years later we would both be in the midst of

Book Review: “The Dialogues” by Clifford Johnson

Tuesday, January 16, 16:56 UTC @ Backreaction

Clifford Johnson is a veteran of the science blogosphere, a long-term survivor, around already when I began blogging and one of the few still at it today. He is professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California (in LA). I had the pleasure of meeting Clifford in 2007. Who’d have thought back then that 10 years later we would both be in the midst of

Donald Knuth Turns 80 years and 6 days

Tuesday, January 16, 16:41 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Celebrating Donald Knuth's 80th birthday, or 80 years + 7 days birthday seems odd. Should we use powers of 2? Hmm- too few, just 32 and 64 really. And having a 32-year celebration for someone is unusual. How about numbers that end in 0 in base 8. 64 would be 100, 72 would 110, 80 would be 120 so AH- we would be celebrating! So lets Celebrate! LANCE: One of us should blog about Don Knuth turning 80. BILL: How about both of us, sep posts? Lance had his post

Quicklisp news: The Quicklisp local-projects mechanism

Tuesday, January 16, 16:29 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Quicklisp provides a lot of software, but there's also a simple way to load things that Quicklisp doesn't provide. That same mechanism can be used to override libraries Quicklisp does provide. The local projects mechanism sets up a special directory that is automatically scanned for software to load. Here are a few quick examples.

Join Leap: An Online Community for Women

Tuesday, January 16, 15:49 UTC @ Y Combinator

I’m excited to share an experimental project I’ve been working on at YC over the last 10 months. It’s called Leap and it’s an online community for women in tech to talk about whatever we want.

Quicklisp news: Build failures with ASDF 3.3.1

Tuesday, January 16, 15:48 UTC @ Planet Lisp

SBCL 1.4.3 ships with ASDF 3.3.1, and a number of Quicklisp projects have build problems as a result. Linedit, mgl, micmac, cl-string-match, and others are affected. Here is a build failure report for yesterday. (You can ignore the gendl failures - it's a special case.) If anyone has ways to fix these projects, please do so as soon as you can - otherwise they will be removed from the January Quicklisp dist update in a few we

Exiting the dark ages of capitalism

Tuesday, January 16, 15:34 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

What Makes the Hardest Equations in Physics So Difficult?

Tuesday, January 16, 15:02 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

The Navier-Stokes equations describe simple, everyday phenomena, like water flowing from a garden hose, yet they provide a million-dollar mathematical challenge.

Bliki: IntegrationTest

Tuesday, January 16, 14:38 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Integration tests determine if independently developed units of software work correctly when they are connected to each other. The term has become blurred even by the diffuse standards of the software industry, so I've been wary of using it in my writing. In particular, many people assume integration tests are necessarily broad in scope, while they can be more effectively done with a narrower scope. As often with these things, it's best to start with a bit of history. When I first learned about in

This Week in Rust 217

Tuesday, January 16, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Alex Roy Reviews the Tesla Model 3 After a Cross-Country Speed Run

Tuesday, January 16, 01:44 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alex Roy, writing for The Drive: The Model 3 is a triumph of industrial design. Forget the naysayers. Ask anyone who isn’t a car person, or especially women — a group too often excluded from the conversation, despite its size and disproportionate purchasing power, by an industry yet to have its Weinstein moment — for real perspective. Starting with a clean sheet, Tesla has out-Volvo’ed Volvo, delivering the purest interpretation of Scandinavian design in automo

Adding a toggle Extension on Bool

Tuesday, January 16, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

For Bool variables, it is common to want to toggle the state of the variable. In larger (nested) structs, the duplication involved can become especially annoying: myVar.prop1.prop2.enabled = !myVar.prop1.prop2.enabled It’s also easy to make a mistake in the code above if there are multiple Bool vars. You can solve this problem by adding a method toggle on Bool: exten

Evergreen Diary #5: Send to MarsEdit

Monday, January 15, 22:26 UTC @ inessential.com

The latest build of Evergreen, fresh from the lab, now adds MarsEdit to the sharing menu in the toolbar. When you choose the command, it sends the current article to MarsEdit — which opens it in a new window, and then you can edit and add your own commentary before posting to your blog. * * * See

Product review policies

Monday, January 15, 21:50 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ve often reviewed books on this site and may review other products some day. I wanted to let readers and potential vendors know what my policies are regarding product reviews. I don’t get paid for reviews. I review things that I find interesting and think that readers would find interesting. I don’t do reviews with […]

Evergreen Diary #4: Send to Micro.blog

Monday, January 15, 17:35 UTC @ inessential.com

The latest build of Evergreen adds Micro.blog to the Share menu in the toolbar, if you have the Micro.blog Mac app. It sends the title and link of whatever you’re reading over to the Micro.blog Mac app, and you can edit it before actually posting. This is hugely important. RSS readers exist not to just make reading easy but to make the web a conversation. The next releas

Las neuronas comparten información genética encapsulada en forma de virus

Monday, January 15, 10:40 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El gen Arc se expresa en las neuronas del ratón y está implicado en el aprendizaje a largo plazo. La proteína ARC actúa como un capsómero y se autoensambla en forma de cápside icosaédrica que encierra una copia de […] Leer más

Victor Anyakin: Reading a file line-by-line revisited

Monday, January 15, 10:13 UTC @ Planet Lisp

One of the frequent questions is how do you read a file line by line using Common Lisp? A canonical answer, as formulated by the Practical Common Lisp, section 14. Files and File I/O is essentially the same as the one provided by the Common Lisp Cookbook (Reading a File one Line at a Time): (let ((in (open "/some/file/name

Análogos físicos 2D del efecto Hall cuántico en 4D

Monday, January 15, 07:25 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El 4 de enero de 2018 se publicaron en Nature dos artículos que presentan análogos físicos 2D del efecto Hall cuántico entero en 4D. Algunos medios han aprovechado para titular cosas como que “observan en laboratorio el reflejo de […] Leer más

Hawaii Missile Alert: How One Employee ‘Pushed the Wrong Button’ and Caused a Wave of Panic

Monday, January 15, 04:13 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Amy Wang, reporting for The Washington Post: Around 8:05 a.m., the Hawaii emergency employee initiated the internal test, according to a timeline released by the state. From a drop-down menu on a computer program, he saw two options: “Test missile alert” and “Missile alert.” He was supposed to choose the former; as much of the world now knows, he chose the latter, an initiation of a real-life missile alert. […] Around 8:07 a.m., an errant alert went out to scores

Advancing cloud with memory disaggregation

Monday, January 15, 01:53 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Here at IBM Research – Ireland, we are rethinking the very foundations on which the cloud is built. We are developing a concept and prototype for low-power and high-utilization disaggregated cloud data centres that break known boundaries, enabling the dynamic creation of fit-for-purpose computing environments from a pool of disaggregated resources. Today’s cloud data centres […] The post

Adventures in Fine Hall

Sunday, January 14, 22:47 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Every so often I get a copy of Princeton’s alumni publication in the mail, which I mostly ignore. The latest one however had an entertaining article about the Princeton mathematics department during the 1930s, entitled Adventures in Fine Hall. Various … Continue reading →

Retrotransposons

Sunday, January 14, 18:28 UTC @ Azimuth

This article is very interesting: • Ed Yong, Brain cells share information with virus-like capsules, Atlantic, January 12, 2018. Your brain needs a protein called Arc. If you have trouble making this protein, you’ll have trouble forming new memories. The neuroscientist Jason Shepherd noticed something weird: He saw that these Arc proteins assemble into hollow, […]

Fix string.format("%c", 0).

Sunday, January 14, 13:11 UTC @ Recent commits to luajit-2.0

Atención, pregunta: ¿Pagarías por que los revisores cobraran por hacer la revisión por pares?

Sunday, January 14, 11:40 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

La editorial Taylor & Francis ofrece desde 2016 un curioso servicio a los autores científicos de ciertas revistas biosanitarias. Pagar por una revisión rápida de sus manuscritos en la que los revisores cobran por realizar la revisión por pares. En […]

Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professors, students and developers

Sunday, January 14, 05:47 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Submissions for the IBM Q Prizes are now open: IBM Q Awards website. Whether its PCs, smartphones or quantum computers, one fact remains consistent: the recipe for success relies heavily on building an engaged and thriving ecosystem. For example, on 12 August 1981 when IBM introduced the IBM 5150 (eventually called the IBM PC) at […] The post Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professo

Insignificant details

Saturday, January 13, 13:21 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Uber’s Secret Tool for Keeping the Cops in the Dark

Saturday, January 13, 04:45 UTC @ Daring Fireball

At this point Uber should best be described not as a business or startup, but as a racket, a criminal enterprise. ★

Timing Leaks Everything

Saturday, January 13, 04:30 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Facing the awful truth that computers are physical machines As moderator of RSA 2016 panel Paul Kocher is the lead author on the second of two papers detailing a longstanding class of security vulnerability that was recognized only recently. He is an author on the first paper. Both papers credit his CRYPTO 1996 paper as […]

The iOS Economy, Updated

Friday, January 12, 21:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Horace Dediu, on the latest figures from Apple on App Store revenue: A few observations: Developer payment rate is now above $25 billion/yr. I’ve been notified via Twitter that this is higher than the revenue of McDonald’s Corporation in 2016. During this year iOS users will be spending about $100 million per day for Apps. This was Google’s

Advice for First Time Founders

Friday, January 12, 20:49 UTC @ Y Combinator

YC founders respond to the question: What are some things that you should've known as a first-time founder but did not?

Peter Valdes-Dapena Reviews the Tesla Model 3

Friday, January 12, 20:20 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Perhaps unsurprisingly for a review for CNN, the video seems like the “real” review, and the written article seems like an afterthought extracted from the video review. He makes three main points: The car drives and performs well, about how you’d expect given Tesla’s reputation. It’s expensive for what you get compared to other cars in this price range — but this point seems hard to quantify, because none of those other cars have Tesla’s excellent

Interactive Line Editing in .NET

Friday, January 12, 20:04 UTC @ Miguel de Icaza

Even these days, I still spend too much time on the command line. My friends still make fun of my MacOS desktop when they see that I run a full screen terminal, and the main program that I am running there is the Midnight Commander: Every once in a while I write an interactive application, and I want to have full bash-like command line

Facebook Purportedly Changes News Feed to Make It ‘Good for People’

Friday, January 12, 19:57 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Laura Hazard Owen, writing for the Nieman Journalism Lab: Facebook is making big, immediate changes to News Feed. The company will now prioritize content from friends, family, and groups over “public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a post Thursday night. News publishers that have relied on Facebook for traffic will suffer: “Some news helps start co

How AI can help enterprise workers automatically triage conversations

Friday, January 12, 19:55 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Knowledge workers spend an average of 28 hours in a typical work week on email and messaging, conversations and collaboration. Much of these communications are centered around getting organized and getting work done — define actions or tasks, make requests and commitments of each other, and exchange updates on the status of the work in progress. However, information overload remains a […] The post

Member of The Band – Alonso Quesada Sr. .NET Web Services Developer

Friday, January 12, 17:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of The Band – Alonso Quesada Sr. .NET Web Service

Flipping Wyoming

Friday, January 12, 15:29 UTC @ bit-player

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 12 January 2018

Friday, January 12, 14:24 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Wow: it's Friday already! Let's review what happened over the past week: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 17 January. Board calendar and minutes http://... ASF Infrastructure –our distributed team on three continents keeps the ASF's in

Scaling SaaS Marketing | Hangout with Andrus Purde

Friday, January 12, 14:15 UTC @ Business of Software USA

The First BoS Hangout of 2018 was with Andrus Purde, founder of Outfunnel and ex-Head of Marketing at Pipedrive. As Head of Marketing, Andrus Purde saw Pipedrive grow from a small startup to over 50,000 customers. Hear his insight in running a marketing team through that transition in this very interesting Q&A. Andrus talks about […] The post Scaling SaaS Marketing | Hangout with A

Podcast CB S&R 145: Preguntas de oyentes y popurrí de noticias

Friday, January 12, 11:25 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

He participado en el episodio 145 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Star Wars sin Spoilers; Incertidumbres en Física; Temperatura y Calor; #CienciaEnElParlamento”, 12 Ene 2018. “La tertulia semanal ha repasado las últimas noticias de la […]

La propagación de llamas en microgravedad

Friday, January 12, 09:43 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El fuego es uno de los mayores peligros en las misiones espaciales tripuladas. En la Estación Espacial Internacional (ISS) un experimento estudia llamas en microgravedad, usando varillas de PMMA sometidas a flujo opuesto de un gas inerte. La propagación […] Leer más

Ben Bajarin: ‘Apple’s Indirect Presence Fades From CES’

Thursday, January 11, 23:16 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ben Bajarin, writing from CES 2018: We would go to CES and remark at how Apple’s dominance loomed over the show. Vendors of all shapes and sizes were rushing to be a part of the Apple ecosystem. Apple’s ecosystem was front and center with everything from iOS apps, to accessories galore for iPhone and iPad, and even companies looking to copy Apple in many ways. The last year or so, things have dramatically changed, and that change is further evident at this year’s CES. Gon

Mentions: Proof-of-Concept

Thursday, January 11, 21:13 UTC @ inessential.com

Ben Curtis posted feed_searcher to GitHub — it creates custom search feeds, and even has a handy Deploy to Heroku button. Cool. (This is in reference to App Idea: Mentions).

App Idea: Inside Story

Thursday, January 11, 21:09 UTC @ inessential.com

I had this idea around the time Apple came out with Bonjour (née Rendezvous), and all these years later I realize I’m never going to get around to it. Here’s the scoop: The idea is microblog posts (tweet-like) but that live inside a specific network only. You run a Mac app that: Lets you post short messages. Shows short messages from people inside your network. The app runs a small webserver that’s discoverable via Bonjour, that has a

Confide Popular With Republican Politicians

Thursday, January 11, 19:58 UTC @ Daring Fireball

I thought that Confide rang a bell. I hadn’t tried it personally until yesterday, but now I remember where I’d heard of it: in the early days of the Trump White House, there were reports like this one from Axios that leaking staff members were using it to communicate privately.

AI eases transition for new hires

Thursday, January 11, 19:46 UTC @ x.ai

Starting a new job is a lot like scuba diving: you’re launching into an unfamiliar environment, curious about the mysteries … ⋙ The post AI eases transition for new hires appeared first on x.ai.

Everything I know about marketing I learned from the 1990 movie “Crazy People.”

Thursday, January 11, 19:45 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

YC Bio

Thursday, January 11, 19:16 UTC @ Y Combinator

I’m excited to announce a new experiment we’re going to try: YC Bio. YC Bio is a new way for us to fund early-stage life science companies that are still in the lab phase.

With ‘Downsized’ DNA, Flowering Plants Took Over the World

Thursday, January 11, 19:00 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Compact genomes and tiny cells gave flowering plants an edge over competing flora. This discovery hints at a broader evolutionary principle.

Female Founders Conference Seattle: Speakers

Thursday, January 11, 18:12 UTC @ Y Combinator

We’re looking forward to hosting our first Female Founders Conference event of the year in Seattle on Feb 3. We're excited to be joined by these speakers...

New in Highrise — our Small Business CRM

Thursday, January 11, 17:24 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

App Store Upload Failures

Thursday, January 11, 13:32 UTC @ Indie Stack

I’ve been running into failures to connect to iTunes Connect through Application Loader. Others corroborate similar problems uploading through Xcode. The nut of the problem comes down to a failure to authenticate a specific Apple ID. The failure string is “Unable to process authenticateWithArguments request at this time due to a general error”: Whatever is … Continue reading

★ ScreenShield — a Third-Party SDK That Somehow Allows iOS Apps to Prevent Screenshots

Thursday, January 11, 03:34 UTC @ Daring Fireball

It’s an interesting puzzle trying to figure out how they’re doing this.

Average fraction round up

Thursday, January 11, 03:23 UTC @ John D. Cook

Pick a large number n. Divide n by each of the positive integers up to n and round the results up to the nearest integer. On average, how far do you round up? Or in terms of probability, what is the expected distance between a fraction n/r, where n is large and fixed and r is chosen randomly […]

Wired: ‘How Outlier, the Underground Fashion Label for Nerds, Got Cool’

Thursday, January 11, 02:45 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Adam Rogers, writing for Wired on indie menswear maker Outlier (a former DF sponsor): Pants tough enough to deal with anything became Outlier’s signature play — trousers “for the end of the world,” as the folks at GQ put it. “We were trying to solve a specific cycling problem,” Burmeister says. “How to not look like a cyclis

Gorilla Logic is Recognized in Gartner’s Market Guide for Agile and DevOps Services

Wednesday, January 10, 22:19 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Companies increasingly rely on external agile and DevOps service providers to drive innovation while meeting rapidly evolving business and technical requirements. According to Gartner’s Market Guide for Agile and DevOps Services, “Agile, iterative or lean methodologies are now used by 57% of software development teams.” However, relative to selecting an agile or DevOps service provider, […] The post

Dark Energy Survey (DES) descubre once nuevas corrientes estelares en la Vía Láctea

Wednesday, January 10, 20:06 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Se llama canibalismo galáctico a la interacción entre una gran galaxia y sus galaxias satélites enanas. Como resultado aparecen grandes corrientes de estrellas (stellar streams). El proyecto DES (Dark Energy Survey) acaba de publicar sus primeros resultados tres años […]

Android Central: ‘Essential Phone Review, Four Months Later: The Sun Is Setting on This Experiment’

Wednesday, January 10, 19:56 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Andrew Martonik, writing for Android Central two weeks ago: It all starts with just general app instability. Apps crash — a lot. More than I’ve experienced on any other phone. They freeze, stutter, lock up and force close. Sometimes you tap an app to open it, and nothing happens for multiple seconds. When an app calls up another one through a share action, it takes the same egregious delay. Sometimes apps open and switch just fine, but then randomly slow down to a crawl wi

Why Oprah’s talk works: Insight from a TED speaker coach

Wednesday, January 10, 19:26 UTC @ TED Blog

By Abigail Tenembaum and Michael Weitz of Virtuozo When Oprah Winfrey spoke at the Golden Globes last Sunday night, her speech lit up social media within minutes. It was powerful, memorable and somehow exactly what the world wanted to hear. It inspired multiple standing O’s — and even a semi-serious Twitter campaign to elect her […]

‘The Good War’

Wednesday, January 10, 18:39 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Thought-provoking graphic essay by Mike Dawson and Chris Hayes. ★

MacOS 10.13 High Sierra’s App Store System Prefs Panel Can Be Unlocked With Any Password

Wednesday, January 10, 18:17 UTC @ Daring Fireball

This one is relatively low stakes: These settings are unlocked by default for admin users. Entering a bogus password only works if you’re logged in as an admin user. The settings in this panel aren’t particularly sensitive. It’s apparently already fixed in the current High Sierra developer betas. But, still, this is embarrassing given what we just went through

Astronomers Trace Radio Burst to Extreme Cosmic Neighborhood

Wednesday, January 10, 18:00 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

A mysterious object that repeatedly bursts with ultra-powerful radio waves must live in an extreme environment — something like the one around a supermassive black hole.

Francis en LFDLC: Números primos, brechas de seguridad, estrella Tabby y más noticias

Wednesday, January 10, 17:35 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Ya puedes escuchar el podcast iVoox del Programa 320 de La Fábrica de la Ciencia, “Super-número primo, estrella Tabby, Meltdown y otras noticias de la Mula Francis con Francis Villatoro”, en el que Jorge Onsulve Orellana, @jonsulve, me ha […] Leer más<

Hate your job? Happier times are within your grasp

Wednesday, January 10, 14:23 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Donald Knuth Turns Eighty

Wednesday, January 10, 13:26 UTC @ Computational Complexity

We've kept this blog going long enough that we start repeating our celebrations. Ten years ago Bill celebrated Don Knuth's 70th Birthday and today Donald Knuth turns 80. While he celebrates in Piteå, Sweden with its less than 4.5 hours of daylight, we wish him a happy birthday from stateside. Looking back in this blog, in 2015 I wrote abou

Small

Wednesday, January 10, 13:16 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Six blog posts on the mathematics of privacy

Wednesday, January 10, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Six blog posts on mathematics and privacy: Randomized response and Bayes’ theorem Big aggregate queries can still violate privacy  Quantifying privacy loss Database anonymization for testing Toxic pairs and re-identification Adding Laplacian or Gaussian noise to a database

Superfluid dark matter gets seriously into business

Wednesday, January 10, 12:54 UTC @ Backreaction

very dark fluid Most matter in the universe isn’t like the stuff we are made of. Instead, it’s a thinly distributed, cold, medium which rarely interacts both with itself and with other kinds of matter. It also doesn’t emit light, which is why physicists refer to it as “dark matter.” A recently proposed idea, according to which dark matter may be superfluid, has now become more concrete,

Superfluid dark matter gets seriously into business

Wednesday, January 10, 12:54 UTC @ Backreaction

very dark fluid Most matter in the universe isn’t like the stuff we are made of. Instead, it’s a thinly distributed, cold, medium which rarely interacts both with itself and with other kinds of matter. It also doesn’t emit light, which is why physicists refer to it as “dark matter.” A recently proposed idea, according to which dark matter may be superfluid, has now become more concrete,

IBM Fellow Awarded Levchin Prize for Contributions to Cryptography

Wednesday, January 10, 11:03 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

We can all thank an elementary school teacher for keeping our electronic data safe and secure. Growing up in Argentina, and studying in Israel, not far from where his career started at IBM’s Haifa Lab, IBM Fellow and cryptographer, Hugo M. Krawczyk cites his third-grade teacher as one of his first influences. “She piqued my […] The post IBM Fellow Awarde

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Trafodion™ as a Top-Level Project

Wednesday, January 10, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Mature Big Data database management system for working in SQL at Apache Hadoop-scale levels in use China Mobile, China Unicom, Dell EMC, Esgyn Corporation, and Millersoft Limited, among others. Forest Hill, MD —10 January 2018— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today that Apache® Trafodion

Pop-Up Mobile Ads Surge as Sites Scramble to Stop Them

Wednesday, January 10, 02:21 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Lily Hay Newman, reporting for Wired: These redirects can show up seemingly out of the blue when you’re in a mobile browser like Chrome, or even when you’re using a service like Facebook or Twitter and navigating to a page through one of their in-app browsers. Suddenly you go from loading a news article to wriggling away from an intrusive ad. What enables these ad redirects to haunt virtually any browser or app at any time, rather than just the sketchy backwaters in which

Google Announces Plan to Improve URLs for AMP Pages, But Even If It Happens, Which Remains Uncertain, AMP Will Still Suck

Wednesday, January 10, 00:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Malte Ubl, tech lead for the AMP Project at Google Based on this web standard AMP navigations from Google Search can take advantage of privacy-preserving preloading and the performance of Google’s servers, while URLs remain as the publisher intended and the primary security context of the web, the origin, remains intact. We have built a prototype based on the Chrome Browser and an experimental version of Google Search to make sure it actually does deliver on both the desired UX and

North Carolina Congressional Map Ruled Unconstitutionally Gerrymandered

Tuesday, January 09, 23:53 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alan Blinder, reporting for The New York Times: A panel of federal judges struck down North Carolina’s congressional map on Tuesday, declaring it unconstitutionally gerrymandered and demanding that the Republican-controlled General Assembly redraw district lines before this year’s midterm elections. The ruling was the first time that a federal court had blocked a congressional map because the judges believed it to be a partisan gerrymander, and it deepened the political cha

New Bill Aims to Eliminate Paperless Voting Machines

Tuesday, January 09, 23:18 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Timothy B. Lee, writing for Ars Technica: “With the 2018 elections just around the corner, Russia will be back to interfere again,” said co-sponsor Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.). So a group of senators led by James Lankford (R-Okla.) wants to shore up the security of American voting systems ahead of the 2018 and 2020 elections. And the senators have focused on two major changes that have broad support from voting security experts. The first objective is to ge

App Idea: Mentions

Tuesday, January 09, 21:33 UTC @ inessential.com

“Hold on — I need to check my Mentions.” Ten years ago or more we had several blog-specific search engines and services: Technorati, BlogBridge, and others. One of the great things about these services was not just being able to search for something but being able to set up persistent searches: that is, you’d get a search as an RSS feed, and in your feed reader you’d get results from all over the place on the thing you’re searching for. In the obvious and comm

Various News

Tuesday, January 09, 21:15 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Now back from vacation in a much warmer location than New York. Some things I noticed while away: I see that Paris has a bid to host the 2022 ICM. Everyone should strongly support this, one can’t have too many … Continue reading →

Whither the DBA

Tuesday, January 09, 21:07 UTC @ tecosystems

It should not be controversial to say that the way software is written in 2018 is materially different than in 2008, let alone 1998. Not just in terms of the underlying technologies, which have inevitably evolved and been refined, but the associated processes and methodologies. Whether driven by the introduction of transformative technologies ranging from

Whither the DBA

Tuesday, January 09, 21:07 UTC @ tecosystems

It should not be controversial to say that the way software is written in 2018 is materially different than in 2008, let alone 1998. Not just in terms of the underlying technologies, which have inevitably evolved and been refined, but the associated processes and methodologies. Whether driven by the introduction of transformative technologies ranging from

Regarding This Open Letter From Two Investor Groups to Apple Regarding Kids’ Use of Devices

Tuesday, January 09, 21:06 UTC @ Daring Fireball

David Gelles, reporting for The New York Times: Now, two of the biggest investors on Wall Street have asked Apple to study the health effects of its products and to make it easier for parents to limit their children’s use of iPhones and iPads. […] Jana, an activist hedge fund, wrote its letter with Calstrs, the California State Teachers’ Retirement System, which manages the pensions of California’s public-school teachers. When such investors pressure companies to ch

AT&T Drops Huawei’s New Smartphone Amid Security Worries

Tuesday, January 09, 20:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Paul Mozur, reporting for The New York Times: AT&T walked away from a deal to sell the Huawei smartphone, the Mate 10, to customers in the United States just before the partnership was set to be unveiled, said two people on Tuesday familiar with the plans, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the discussions were not public. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier that AT&T had changed plans. The reasons that led to AT&T’s shift were not entirely clear

Building for the Blockchain

Tuesday, January 09, 19:28 UTC @ Y Combinator

Our goal in this post is to: 1. Explain how blockchain development differs from existing development paradigms. 2. Provide context for the opportunities and challenges in this space. 3. Point you to resources that will give you the foundation to start developing in this new paradigm.

Ad Tracking Companies Complain About Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention

Tuesday, January 09, 18:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alex Hern, in a decidedly-pro-ad-industry report for The Guardian: Internet advertising firms are losing hundreds of millions of dollars following the introduction of a new privacy feature from Apple that prevents users from being tracked around the web. Advertising technology firm Criteo, one of the largest in the industry, says that the Intelligent Tracking Prevention (ITP) feature for Safari, which holds 15% of the global browser market, is likely to cut its 2018 revenue by

Meet the 2018 class of TED Fellows and Senior Fellows

Tuesday, January 09, 16:03 UTC @ TED Blog

The TED Fellows program is excited to announce the new group of TED2018 Fellows and Senior Fellows. Representing a wide range of disciplines and countries — including, for the first time in the program, Syria, Thailand and Ukraine — this year’s TED Fellows are rising stars in their fields, each with a bold, original approach […]

My Crazy Plans for the New Year (Book Teaser)

Tuesday, January 09, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

Happy new year! It seems like good time for a Quality Coding retrospective. I also want to share some goals for 2018. …Did someone say, “Are you writing a book?” Subscribers In 2017, Quality Coding crossed over 2,000 subscribers! (Are you one of them? All subscribers get my test-focused code snippets.) …Crossing the 2,000 threshold […]

Double blind review at theory conferences: More thoughts.

Tuesday, January 09, 07:41 UTC @ The Geomblog

I've had a number of discussions with people both before and after the report that Rasmus and I wrote on the double-blind experiment at ALENEX. And I think it's helpful to lay out some of my thoughts on both the purpose of double blind review as I understand it, and the logistical challenges of implementing it. What is the purpose of double blind review? The goal is to mitigate the effects of the unconscious, implicit biases that we all possess and that influence our dec

Me, elsewhere

Tuesday, January 09, 07:14 UTC @ Backreaction

Beginning 2018, I will no longer write for Ethan Siegel’s Forbes collection “Starts With a Bang.” Instead, I will write a semi-regular column for Quanta Magazine, the first of which -- about asymptotically safe gravity -- appeared yesterday. In contrast to Forbes, Quanta Magazine keeps the copyright, which means that the articles I write for them will not be mirrored on this blog. You

Me, elsewhere

Tuesday, January 09, 07:14 UTC @ Backreaction

Beginning 2018, I will no longer write for Ethan Siegel’s Forbes collection “Starts With a Bang.” Instead, I will write a semi-regular column for Quanta Magazine, the first of which -- about asymptotically safe gravity -- appeared yesterday. In contrast to Forbes, Quanta Magazine keeps the copyright, which means that the articles I write for them will not be mirrored on this blog. You

This Week in Rust 216

Tuesday, January 09, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Ten years of blogging

Tuesday, January 09, 03:47 UTC @ John D. Cook

Ten years ago I started writing this blog. Since then I’ve written about 2700 posts. Thank you all for reading, commenting, and sharing. Update: For highlights of my posts over the years, see Tim Hopper’s post John Cook’s Ten Year Blogging Endeavour.

[Sponsor] Jamf Now

Tuesday, January 09, 03:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Support your users and their Apple devices without help from IT. Jamf Now is a simple device management solution designed to help anyone set up, manage, and protect Apple devices at work. Easily configure email and Wi-Fi networks, distribute apps to your team, and protect sensitive data without locking down devices. LATEST FEATURE: OS Updates: Keep your Apple devices running the latest versions of iOS and macOS by initiating OS Updates with Jamf Now.

What Spectre and Meltdown Mean for WebKit

Tuesday, January 09, 01:13 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Great explanation from Filip Pizlo on the Spectre and Meltdown-related changes that have shipped (and will ship) in WebKit. Includes a pretty good overview of how the Spectre exploit works. ★

A Functional Interface for Imperative Code

Tuesday, January 09, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In last week’s Swift Talk episode, Refactoring Imperative Layout Code, we refactored an imperative flow layout algorithm into an algorithm with a functional interface. In this article, we’ll implement a justified version of this flow layout. Thanks to the functional interface, we can plug it in by changing a single line of code. With no implicit state, the interface makes it easy to swap out implementations,

How Meltdown and Spectre Were Independently Discovered by Four Research Teams at Once

Monday, January 08, 23:54 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Great piece by Andy Greenberg for Wired: Yet when Intel responded to the trio’s warning — after a long week of silence — the company gave them a surprising response. Though Intel was indeed working on a fix, the Graz team wasn’t the first to tell the chip giant about the vulnerability. In fact, two other research teams had beaten them to it. Counting another, related technique that would come to be known as Spectre, Intel told the researchers they were actually

90Fun’s Puppy 1 Auto-Following Suitcase Won’t Stop Falling Over

Monday, January 08, 23:42 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Natt Garun, reporting for The Verge from CES: Last week, 90Fun announced an autonomous suitcase that uses Segway’s self-balancing technology and a remote control to follow you around, leaving your hands free. We took 90Fun’s Puppy 1 suitcase for a spin at CES, and it’s clear that the vision of hassle-free travel is still some ways away. We we

Pharmaceutical Ads in the U.S.

Monday, January 08, 23:30 UTC @ Daring Fireball

From Harper’s Index for January: Amount the US pharmaceutical industry spent in 2016 on ads for prescription drugs: $6,400,000,000 Number of countries in which direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical ads are legal: 2 ★

Electronic Toymaker VTech Settles for $650,000 With FTC Over Children’s Privacy Suit

Monday, January 08, 22:39 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Shannon Liao, reporting for The Verge: The Federal Trade Commission said today that the electronic toymaker VTech Electronics has agreed to settle for a fine of $650,000, to be paid within the next seven days, after charges that it violated children’s privacy. The Hong Kong-based VTech is also the parent company of LeapFrog, a popular brand for educational entertainment for childr

Goodbye Android Pay, Hello Google Pay

Monday, January 08, 20:33 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Pali Bhat, writing on the official Google blog: Today, we’re excited to announce we’ll be bringing together all the different ways to pay with Google, including Android Pay and Google Wallet, into a single brand: Google Pay. This makes sense. Or better said, I don’t think Android Pay ever made sense as a brand from Google’s perspective. “Google Pay” works as a brand anywhere, on any device. It seems to me that Google is stepping

How to Take a Picture of a Stealth Bomber Over the Rose Bowl

Monday, January 08, 20:19 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Fascinating interview by Alexis Madrigal with aerial photographer Mark Holtzman: Madrigal: So that’s the picture as you took it right out of the camera, or did you have to crop it? Hotlzman: I always crop it a little. I had to rotate it a little. In the uncropped version, I had the whole stadium, plus some of the parking lot. Unlike film, the way you shoot digital is you shoot wider and crop it in. It’s hard. Things are happening really quick. It’s very fluid. I’m flyin

Intrinsic String Encoding

Monday, January 08, 19:50 UTC @ Indie Stack

I was baffled today while investigating a bug in MarsEdit, which a customer reported as only seeming to affect the app when writing in Japanese. I pasted some Japanese text into the app and was able to reproduce the bug easily. What really confused me, though was that the bug persisted even after I replaced … Continue reading Intrinsic String Encoding U

Improving Link Time on Windows with clang-cl and lld

Monday, January 08, 18:06 UTC @ Planet Clang

One of our goals in bringing clang and lld to Windows has always been to improve developer experience, and what is it that developers want the most?  Faster build times!  Recently, our focus has been on improving link time because it's the step that's the hardest to parallelize so we can't fall back on the time honored tradition of throwing more cores at it.Of the various steps involved in linking, generating the debug info (which, on Windows, is a PDB file) is by far the slowest since it involves merging

Monitoring in a DevOps World

Monday, January 08, 16:05 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Monitoring can seem quite overwhelming. The most important thing to remember is that perfect should never be the enemy of better. DevOps enables highly iterative improvement within organizations. If you have no monitoring, get something; get anything. Something is better than nothing, and if you've embraced DevOps, you've already signed up for making it better over time.

Swift Non-Nil Values In An Array Of Optionals

Monday, January 08, 13:30 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

I find it hard to remember the different ways you can use case with Swift beyond the familiar switch. Here is one useful example for when you need to do something with the non-nil values in an array of optionals. Here is the situation. I have an array of String items some of which can be nil. let names = ["Tom", nil, "Fred"] The type of names is [String?] - an array of o

Conditional Conformance in the Standard Library

Monday, January 08, 12:00 UTC @ Swift.org

The Swift 4.1 compiler brings the next phase of improvements from the roadmap for generics: conditional conformances. This post will look at how this much-anticipated feature has been adopted in Swift’s standard library, and how it affects you and your code. Equatable Cont

A new largest prime found!

Monday, January 08, 02:21 UTC @ Computational Complexity

A new largest KNOWN prime has been discovered and its 23 million digits long. Nate Silver's website had an article about it (written by Oliver Roeder) here An article about why people do this is here Lance posted about finding large primes in 2006

How to prepare to work successfully with a software developer

Monday, January 08, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

When I have a first conversation with a new client, they are always eager to get underway. Naturally, you want the shortest development timeline possible. When you sign a contract for software development, you want to get your idea first to market or you have internal company deadlines to meet; both of which are very real business pressures. How should you prepare to get your development team off to a fast start and not stalled in the starting blocks? Project Purpose <

The Kepler Problem (Part 1)

Sunday, January 07, 23:00 UTC @ Azimuth

Johannes Kepler loved geometry, so of course he was fascinated by Platonic solids. His early work Mysterium Cosmographicum, written in 1596, includes pictures showing how the 5 Platonic solids correspond to the 5 elements: Five elements? Yes, besides earth, air, water and fire, he includes a fifth element that doesn’t feel the Earth’s gravitational pull: […]

Report on double blind reviewing in ALENEX 2018

Sunday, January 07, 20:54 UTC @ The Geomblog

+Rasmus Pagh and I chaired ALENEX 2018, and we decided to experiment with double blind review for the conference. What follows is a report that we wrote on our experiences doing this. There are some useful notes about logistics, especially in the context of a theoretically-organized conference on experimental algorithms.

Evergreen Diary #3: On Punting

Saturday, January 06, 21:10 UTC @ inessential.com

I have a vision for 1.0, and then, as time goes on, I have to cut it back beyond where it hurts. I have to keep punting. I hate this part of shipping software. But I also love it because it reminds me that I have the stomach for it. Shipping software is an emotional skill. After shipping — no matter what — there will be people who absolutely cannot believe that feature X wasn’t included. In fact, it’s the one thing they totally need. And they’re right. Not wrong. And I

Reseña: “Un número perfecto” de Santi García Cremades

Saturday, January 06, 18:11 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

“He podido observar [un] gran consenso entre la comunidad docente de Matemáticas e incluso la comunidad divulgadora. [La] Comunidad del Anillo se nos quedaría en una pobre secuela de lo que vivimos. Nuestra comunidad lo tiene claro, todos hemos […] Leer más

How Time Lords hack Amy + Andrew

Friday, January 05, 22:13 UTC @ x.ai

We’ve spent four years building x.ai based on a simple premise: technology is ready to help us control time. The post How Time Lords hack Amy + Andrew appeared first on x.ai.

Published in Science: IBM and Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers solve cancer immunotherapy mystery

Friday, January 05, 19:58 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Cancer immunotherapies, treatment approaches which harness a person’s own immune system to target and kill cancer cells, are currently a major driver in the development of new cancer treatments.  With the advent of next-generation gene editing technologies like CRISPR-Cas9, one could imagine a future in which cancer treatments are tailor-made not only for particular cancer […] The post

Member of The Band – Duvelis Carao Sr. Java Developer

Friday, January 05, 18:41 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of The Band – Duvelis Carao Sr. Java Developer appeare

Do you have to manually unregister block-based NotificationCenter observers?

Friday, January 05, 18:10 UTC @ Ole Begemann

tl;dr: yes. (Tested on iOS 11.2.) A few weeks ago, I asked this question on Twitter: In iOS 11, is it still necessary to unregister block-based notification center observers? Apple docs are ambiguous: docs for addObserver(forName:object:queue:using:) say yes

What a difference a JVM makes?

Friday, January 05, 17:27 UTC @ Psychosomatic, Lobotomy, Saw

Which of these Math acronyms are well known?

Friday, January 05, 16:20 UTC @ Computational Complexity

The last time I taught Grad Ramsey Theory there were very good math grads and ugrads in it. They used some acronyms - some I knew, some I didn't know (but know now). I am sure some are well known and some are now. I don't know which is which. Here is the list and comments WLOG- Without Loss of Generality. This one I know and it seems well know-- When Googled the first page is all this definition. (Maybe I shouldn't use the term ``Googled''- I've heard that brand names don't l

Quicklisp news: Download stats for December, 2017

Friday, January 05, 16:08 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Here are the raw Quicklisp download stats for December, 2017: 27247 alexandria 23604 closer-mop 21195 anaphora 20818 cl-ppcre 20690 split-sequence 20360 let-plus 20153

Christophe Rhodes: algorithms and data structures term1

Friday, January 05, 15:52 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Another term, another cycle of Algorithms & Data Structures. This year I am teaching the entire two-term course by myself, compared with last academic year when I co-taught with another member of staff. The change brings with it different challenges; notably that I am directly responsible for more content. Or in this case, more multiple-choice quizzes! This term, the students have been given nine multiple-choice quizzes, of which four are new content

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 5 January 2018

Friday, January 05, 15:46 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Welcome, 2018! We hope that you have had a festive holiday season and are excited to kick off the new year. Here's what happened over the past week: Apache in 2017 - By The Digits https://... ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 17 January. Board calendar and minutes

Leah Culver of Breaker and Tom Sparks of YC Answer Your Questions About Security and Podcasting

Friday, January 05, 10:40 UTC @ Y Combinator

Leah Culver is cofounder and CTO of Breaker, which is a social podcast listening and discovery app. They went through YC in the Winter 2017 batch. Tom Sparks is an engineer on the YC Software team. He also cofounded Cryptoseal which went through YC in the Summer 2011 batch.

Six Beautiful iPhone X Wallpapers

Thursday, January 04, 22:41 UTC @ Dan Counsell

Last year I made a set of “Notchless” iPhone wallpapers, the post was very popular but I had a lot of requests for some wallpapers that didn’t hide the notch. So with that in mind, I’ve put together a new set of six beautiful iPhone X wallpapers, this time they don’t hide the notch. All … Continue reading Six Beautiful iPhone X Wallpapers

YC in Toronto and Seattle

Thursday, January 04, 18:56 UTC @ Y Combinator

This winter, YC will be hosting office hours and talks in cities across the US and Canada. The full list will be released later this month, but for our first two stops, we'll be visiting Toronto and Seattle.

New prime on the block

Thursday, January 04, 16:55 UTC @ Terra Incognita

The GIMPS (Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search) has confirmed yesterday the new largest known prime number: 277,232,917-1. This new largest known prime has 23,249,425 digits and is, of course, a Mersenne prime, prime numbers expressed in the form of 2n – 1, where the primality can be efficiently calculated using Lucas-Lehmer primality test. One of...

New prime number record: 50th Mersenne prime

Thursday, January 04, 15:21 UTC @ John D. Cook

A new record for the largest known prime was announced yesterday: This number has 23,249,425 digits when written in base 10. In base 2, 2p – 1 is a sequence of p ones. For example, 31 = 25 -1  which is 11111 in binary. So in binary, the new record prime is a string of 77,232,917 […]

About the Meltdown and Spectre attacks

Thursday, January 04, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

About the Meltdown and Spectre attacks: FreeBSD was made aware of the problems in late December 2017. We're working with CPU vendors and the published papers on these attacks to mitigate them on FreeBSD. Due to the fundamental nature of the attacks, no estimate is yet available for the publication date of patches.

Zach Beane: Vectometry is now part of Vecto

Wednesday, January 03, 23:22 UTC @ Planet Lisp

I wrote vecto to be able to draw stuff to PNGs. It's based on the PostScript/PDF drawing model, all the way down to the level of function arguments. To move to a point, you use (move-to x y). Curves are done with (curve-to x1 y1 x2 y2 x3 y3). Color calls are done with (set-rgb-fill r g b), etc. Each function argument that has multiple components is passed with the components separated. This is all right, I guess

Apple Developer Program Membership Fee Waivers Now Available

Wednesday, January 03, 18:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

We’re pleased to announce that Apple Developer Program membership is now available at no cost for eligible organizations. Nonprofit organizations, accredited educational institutions, and government entities based in the United States that will distribute only free apps on the App Store can request to have their annual membership fee waived.Learn more about membership fee waivers.

The Omni Show #5 with Mark Boszko

Wednesday, January 03, 16:40 UTC @ inessential.com

In this episode I finally get around to talking to Mark Boszko, the show’s intrepid producer and The Omni Group’s Video Producer. I’ve known Mark for more than ten years — we met at a SXSW conference many years ago, long before either of us came to Omni. Mark didn’t even live in Seattle in those days. Now he does, and now we have the pleasure of working together on a podcast. PS If you li

2018: Some Hope

Wednesday, January 03, 14:29 UTC @ inessential.com

Mike Monteiro writes of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: Jack let it happen. He watched as a once-entertaining, once-illuminating, once-vital network to global communication became a garbage fire of hate. He did nothing to stop it. Or curb it. He didn’t see a problem. Our current crises of democracy and good faith did not just blow in with the wind and transform the air wi

Sometimes I believe in string theory. Then I wake up.

Wednesday, January 03, 14:11 UTC @ Backreaction

They talk about me. Grumpy Rainbow Unicorn.[Image Source.] And I can’t blame them. Because nothing else is happening on this planet. There’s just me and my attempt to convince physicists that beauty isn’t truth. Yes, I know it’s not much of an insight that pretty ideas aren’t always correct. That’s why I objected when my editor suggested I title my book “Why Beauty isn’t Truth.” Because,

Sometimes I believe in string theory. Then I wake up.

Wednesday, January 03, 14:11 UTC @ Backreaction

They talk about me. Grumpy Rainbow Unicorn.[Image Source.] And I can’t blame them. Because nothing else is happening on this planet. There’s just me and my attempt to convince physicists that beauty isn’t truth. Yes, I know it’s not much of an insight that pretty ideas aren’t always correct. That’s why I objected when my editor suggested I title my book “Why Beauty isn’t Truth.” Because,

Tim Urban of Wait But Why

Wednesday, January 03, 10:15 UTC @ Y Combinator

Tim Urban cofounded the blog Wait But Why with Andrew Finn in 2013. His posts about Artificial Intelligence, Elon Musk, and the Fermi Paradox have been read millions of times.

Predictions We Didn’t Make

Wednesday, January 03, 04:59 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

With wishes for a memorable New Year 2018 Muhammad Afzal Upal is Chair of the Computing and Information Science Department at Mercyhurst University. He works in machine learning and cognitive science, most specifically making inferences from textual data. In joint papers he has refined a quantitative approach to the idea of postdiction originally suggested by […]

The Engineer’s Nyquist frequency and the sampling theorem

Wednesday, January 03, 02:15 UTC @ John D. Cook

The Nyquist sampling theorem says that a band-limited signal can be recovered from evenly-spaced samples. If the highest frequency component of the signal is fc then the function needs to be sampled at a frequency of at least the Nyquist frequency 2fc. Or to put it another way, the spacing between samples needs to be […]

Compiling a Subset of APL Into a Typed Intermediate Language

Wednesday, January 03, 00:13 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Compiling a Subset of APL Into a Typed Intermediate Language by Martin Elsman, Martin Dybdal Traditionally, APL is an interpreted language ... In this paper, we present a compiler that compiles a subset of APL into a typed intermediate representation, which should serve as a practical and well-defined intermediate format for targeting parallel-architectures through a large number of existing tools and frameworks. The intermediate l

Christophe Rhodes: sbcl 1 4 3 released

Tuesday, January 02, 16:28 UTC @ Planet Lisp

I released sbcl-1.4.3 just before the new year. Mostly this blog post is to remind me that I need to improve the release script: The script assumes that I build on x86-64. That is usually true, but this month there's a problem with building on my release build host, which is a squeeze-era VM: the new immobile-space support on x86-64 uses a synchonization builtin (

Buying a Commodore Amiga 30 Years Later

Tuesday, January 02, 12:02 UTC @ Dan Counsell

When I was younger we had an Atari ST as our home computer, and while it was a great machine and I loved it dearly, I always found a lot of the games weren’t quite as good as on the Amiga that a lot of my friends had. I routinely used to go to my … Continue reading Buying a Commodore Amiga 30 Years Later

This Week in Rust 215

Tuesday, January 02, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Looking Back, Looking Forward

Tuesday, January 02, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Happy New Year! Looking back, 2017 was a great year for Swift. With Swift 4, we got key paths, Codable, multiline string literals, and much more. The community has been awesome too: we saw a number of promising new libraries, a rich variety of conference talks, and perhaps best of all, new voices joining the Swift community from all kinds of backgrounds. It was also a productive year

Clear and Verifiable

Monday, January 01, 21:57 UTC @ joe cieplinski

The way in which Aaron Sorkin describes Intention and Obstacle in the early bits of his Masterclass is so simple, so easy to comprehend, and most importantly, so easy to test [1]. In just a few minutes, he offers a simple way to detect whether there is an appropriate level

Making sense of a probability problem in the WSJ

Monday, January 01, 16:32 UTC @ John D. Cook

Someone wrote to me the other day asking if I could explain a probability example from the Wall Street Journal. (“Proving Investment Success Takes Time,” Spencer Jakab, November 25, 2017.) Victor Haghani … and two colleagues told several hundred acquaintances who worked in finance that they would flip two coins, one that was normal and […]

Exponential sum for the new year

Monday, January 01, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Exponential sums can make intricate patterns. Last year I made a page that displays a different page each day, using the month, day, and year as parameters in the expression below. The images plot the partial sums of this sum. This was yesterday’s image. Today’s image is surprisingly plain if we use y = 18. This […]

The call for papers formerly known as ICFP

Monday, January 01, 01:45 UTC @ composition.al

2018 will be my third and final year serving as the publicity chair for ICFP, the International Conference on Functional Programming. So, not too long ago, I sent out the call for papers for PACMPL issue ICFP 2018. Wait, what? Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, or PACMPL, is the ACM’s new open-acc

Apache in 2017 - By The Digits

Sunday, December 31, 15:18 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

What an exciting and productive year for the Apache community at-large! We owe our continued success to the tireless efforts of our Members, Committers, and contributors, the loyalty from countless users worldwide, and the ongoing financial support from our Sponsors and individual donors. Join us for a look back at our achievements: Apache Projects — Total number of projects + sub-projects - 318 (not including Apache Labs initiatives)

People of Programming Languages Interviews

Sunday, December 31, 15:17 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

There is a growing set of fascinating interviews with PL folks at People of Programming Languages.

Call for submissions: PaPoC 2018

Sunday, December 31, 01:30 UTC @ composition.al

I’m serving on the program committee for the 2018 Workshop on Principles and Practice of Consistency for Distributed Data, co-located with EuroSys ‘18 in Porto, Portugal. This will be my second time on the PC of PaPoC, a workshop that I like a

Quantum Mechanics and the Dodecahedron

Sunday, December 31, 01:00 UTC @ Azimuth

This is an expanded version of my G+ post, which was a watered-down version of Greg Egan’s G+ post and the comments on that. I’ll start out slow, and pick up speed as I go. Quantum mechanics meets the dodecahedron In quantum mechanics, the position of a particle is not a definite thing: it’s described […]

Zach Beane: FASL package pitfall

Saturday, December 30, 12:40 UTC @ Planet Lisp

In the past month I’ve seen the same failure affect multiple independent projects. Here’s how it happens: Project A has code like this: #+project-b (b:frob "Hello") Project A’s system definition does not have an explicit dependency on project B. Instead, the code that relies on project B is only read and compiled if project B happpens to be loaded first, otherwise it’s ignored. There’s no problem if project A is compi

Animated line drawings with OpenCV

Saturday, December 30, 12:15 UTC @ absorptions

OpenCV is a pretty versatile C++ computer vision library. Because I use it every day it has also become my go-to tool for creating simple animations at pixel level, for fun, and saving them as video files. This is not one of its core functions but happens to be possible using its GUI drawing tools. Below we'll take a look at some video art I wrote for a music project. It goes a bit further than just line drawings but the rest is pretty much just flavouring. As you'll see, creating images in OpenCV

Swift imports fixed-size C arrays as tuples

Friday, December 29, 19:05 UTC @ Ole Begemann

This is a follow-up on yesterday’s article about using a tuple to mimic a stack-allocated array. Please read that one first if you haven’t already. Yesterday, we saw how you can obtain a pointer to a tuple’s underlying memory and treat it as a collection. Today, I’d like to discuss how we can use the same approach when interfacing with C APIs that work with fixed-size array

Quicklisp news: December 2017 Quicklisp dist update now available

Friday, December 29, 17:55 UTC @ Planet Lisp

New projects: cl-ascii-table — Common Lisp library to present tabular data in ascii-art table. — MITcl-editdistance — A Common Lisp implementation of edit distance. — CC-BY-4.0cl-ntriples — CL-NTRIPLES is a simple basic parser for Ntriples data. — BSD

Crypto for Kids: Messenger's Story

Friday, December 29, 15:30 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

A portal suddenly opened on the starboard ejecting a fleet of imperial pursuit vessels. The propulsion system of my ship got hit before the shield activated. I’ve tried to switch on the backup drive but before it charged to as much as 5% I was already dangling off a dozen tractor beams. It wasn’t much of a fight. They’ve just came and picked me up as one would pick up a box of frozen strawberries in a supermarket. I must have passed out because of pressure lo

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 29 December 2017

Friday, December 29, 13:37 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

This is our final Round-up of 2017 --let's review what we've been up to over the past week: Support Apache –help us continue serving the Apache community, shepherding more than 300 projects, and incubating Open Source innovations for generations to come. With just a few days left before the end of the calendar year, we ask that you and your employers consider a gift to the ASF, for which you may receive a tax deduction. Apache projects, Infrastructure, and Operations will

★ Pressing the Side Button to Confirm Payments on iPhone X

Friday, December 29, 03:18 UTC @ Daring Fireball

People naturally expect everything they do on an iPhone to be done on screen.

ROMEO Seeks to Improve Wind Farms with Machine Learning and IoT at the Edge

Thursday, December 28, 22:41 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

This past summer a five-year, €16 million EU Horizon 2020 project kicked off to reduce the maintenance cost of wind turbines using predictive machine learning algorithms, the Internet of Things and cloud computing. The project called ROMEO, or “Reliable Operations & Maintenance Decision tools and strategies for high LCoE reduction on Offshore wind”, and not […] The post

★ Apple Responds to Controversy on iPhone Batteries and Performance

Thursday, December 28, 21:51 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The funny thing about Apple is that their communication problems tend to happen only when they don’t communicate at all. This whole iPhone battery controversy erupted only because Apple had never explained what was going on, which opened them up to accusations of nefarious intent.

A hack for fixed-size arrays in Swift

Thursday, December 28, 19:01 UTC @ Ole Begemann

Swift 4 doesn’t have a built-in type for fixed-size, stack-allocated arrays. And as far as I know, implementing such a type in a generic way (for arbitrary array lengths) is currently impossible — it would require either special compiler support or more advanced generics features, such as variadic generic parameters. Mimicking a fixed-size array with a tuple I came across an interesting workaround for this in the standard library source c

The 600-Cell (Part 3)

Thursday, December 28, 01:00 UTC @ Azimuth

There are still a few more things I want to say about the 600-cell. Last time I described the ‘compound of five 24-cells’. David Richter built a model of this, projected from 4 dimensions down to 3: It’s nearly impossible to tell from this picture, but it’s five 24-cells inscribed in the 600-cell, with each […]

Weak Arrays

Thursday, December 28, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In Swift Talk 81 we created a queue that only references the objects in the queue weakly. Normally a collection references its elements strongly (we’re assuming that the elements are objects), so we need to create a wrapper around each element that breaks the strong reference: final class WeakBox<A: AnyObject> { weak var unbox: A? init(_ value: A) { unbox = value } }

Complexity Year in Review 2017

Wednesday, December 27, 18:40 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Theorem of the year goes to the resolution of the dichotomy conjecture. I wrote about the conjecture in February and while the Feder et. al paper didn't hold up, two later papers seem to resolve the conjecture. A dichotomy theorem for nonuniform CSPs by Andrei Bulatov

Free technical books, mostly chemical engineering

Wednesday, December 27, 13:17 UTC @ John D. Cook

Retiring professor Leonard Fabiano contacted me looking to give away a set of technical books, mostly chemical engineering books. If you’re interested please email him at lenfab@live.com. Here are the books: Click on the image to see a larger version. Two titles are not possible to read in the photo. These are Conduction of heat […]

★ The iPhone X

Wednesday, December 27, 02:36 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The iPhone X is a triumph, a delightful conceptual modernization of a ten-year-old platform that, prior to using the iPhone X, I didn’t think needed a modernization.

Evergreen’s Parser as Separate Open Source Framework

Wednesday, December 27, 02:10 UTC @ inessential.com

I copied Evergreen’s parsing framework, RSParser, to a separate repository on GitHub. It has no dependencies other than system-supplied libraries. It’s offered via the MIT License. It builds a Mac framework only at the moment, but adding an iOS target should be easy. It’s the one issue in the bug tracker (at least so far). Otherwise it’s fast and stable and does the jobs it’s designed to do. Things it parses

More Ups Than Downs

Tuesday, December 26, 19:30 UTC @ joe cieplinski

Rumor has it Apple is cooking up a new framework that helps unify the development of macOS and iOS apps. At least, that’s the part of the rumor that makes the most sense, anyway.[1] Code-named, Marzipan, this new framework would help developers who make either iOS apps or

Genomics and AI push the boundary of precision medicine in blood cancer

Tuesday, December 26, 18:45 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Every nine minutes, someone in the US dies from blood cancer which accounts for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths. And, every three minutes, one person in the US is diagnosed with a blood cancer — about 170,000 people annually.  In 2017, 62,130 people were expected to be diagnosed with leukemia. [1] These numbers […] The post Genomics and AI push the boundary of precision medicine in blood cancer<

Equation for the Eiffel Tower

Tuesday, December 26, 14:57 UTC @ John D. Cook

Robert Banks’s book Towing Icebergs, Falling Dominoes, and Other Adventures in Applied Mathematics describes the Eiffel Tower’s shape as approximately the logarithmic curve where y* and x0 are chosen to match the tower’s dimensions. Here’s a plot of the curve: And here’s the code that produced the plot: from numpy import log, exp, linspace, vectorize import matplotlib.pyplot […]

This Week in Rust 214

Tuesday, December 26, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Merry Christmas!

Monday, December 25, 15:43 UTC @ Backreaction

We wish you all happy holidays! Whether or not you celebrate Christmas, we hope you have a peaceful time to relax and, if necessary, recover. I want to use the opportunity to thank all of you for reading along, for giving me feedback, and for simply being interested in science in a time when that doesn’t seem to be normal anymore. A special “Thank you" to those who have sent donations. It is

Merry Christmas!

Monday, December 25, 15:43 UTC @ Backreaction

We wish you all happy holidays! Whether or not you celebrate Christmas, we hope you have a peaceful time to relax and, if necessary, recover. I want to use the opportunity to thank all of you for reading along, for giving me feedback, and for simply being interested in science in a time when that doesn’t seem to be normal anymore. A special “Thank you" to those who have sent donations. It is

July-September 2017 Status Report

Monday, December 25, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

The July to September 2017 Status Report is now available.

Wrapping up 2017 📦

Monday, December 25, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

2017 is almost over. What a year! Like I did last year I’d like to reflect on what 2017 has been for me and wrote down the highlights in this post. I don’t have any structure for it other than just a list of things that come up to my mind while I’m writing it: Budapest 🏰 - I lived in this city from January to July. María José, my girlfriend, was living and working there and I asked the company for working remotely. They allowed me to do so and I moved there. B

What’s the definition of feminism? 12 talks that explain it to you

Sunday, December 24, 15:52 UTC @ TED Blog

Earlier this month, Merriam-Webster announced that 2017’s word of the year is feminism. Searches for the word on the dictionary website spiked throughout the year, beginning in January around the Women’s March, again after Kellyanne Conway said in an interview that she didn’t consider herself a feminist, and during some of feminism’s many pop culture [<

Sir Roger Penrose’s Toilet Paper

Sunday, December 24, 14:13 UTC @ bit-player

Twenty years ago, Kimberly-Clark, the Kleenex company, introduced a line of toilet paper embossed with the kite-and-dart aperiodic tiling discovered by Roger Penrose. When I first heard about this, I thought: How clever. Because the pattern never repeats, the creases … Continue reading →

The 600-Cell (Part 2)

Sunday, December 24, 07:42 UTC @ Azimuth

This is a compound of five tetrahedra: It looks like a scary, almost random way of slapping together 5 regular tetrahedra until you realize what’s going on. A regular dodecahedron has 20 vertices, while a regular tetrahedron has 4. Since 20 = 4 × 5, you can try to partition the dodecahedron’s vertices into the […]

★ Marzipan

Saturday, December 23, 20:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

In short, Apple’s goal should be to make it easier for developers to create good Mac apps, and easier for Mac and iOS app siblings to share code. Apple’s goal should not be to make it easier to get iOS apps to run on the Mac in slightly modified form.

Your Share of National Wealth for a Microwave Oven!

Saturday, December 23, 07:30 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

Societies we live in are often stuck in suboptimal Nash equilibria (more context here). Those equilibria often arise from misaligned incentives. In many cases, decision makers have no stake in the game and the result, unsurprisingly, sucks. The solution is seemingly easy: Change the rules in such a way that

This Week’s Hype: The Best Explanation for Everything in the Universe

Friday, December 22, 23:06 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Today The Atlantic has, via Quanta Magazine, some unadulterated, pure, grade A hype for the holidays: String Theory: The Best Explanation for Everything in the Universe. In a time when the credibility of science is under attack, does anyone else … Continue reading →

Paul Khuong: How to Print Integers Really Fast (With Open Source AppNexus Code!)

Friday, December 22, 20:13 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Back in 2014, AppNexus needed a faster way to convert machine integers to strings. It’s a stupid problem to have–just use a binary format–but it’s surprisingly common. Maybe a project can only grow large enough for serialisation speed to be an issue if it first disregards some trivial concerns. I can finally share our solution: after failing to nicely package our internal support code for years, we recently got the OK to

Free report: Bright ideas in business from TEDWomen 2017

Friday, December 22, 15:13 UTC @ TED Blog

The Brightline Initiative helps leaders from all types of organizations build bridges between ideas and results. So they felt strong thematic resonance with TEDWomen 2017, which took place in New Orleans from November 1-3, and the conference theme of “Bridges.” In listening to the 50+ speakers who shared ideas, Brightline noted many that felt especially […

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 22 December 2017

Friday, December 22, 14:59 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

One more week to go in 2017! The Apache Community continues to be quite productive, as always, even during the holidays! Here's what happened over the past week: Support Apache –by making a gift to the ASF before 31 December you can help us have the necessary resources to ensure that software from the global Apache community remains available. Apache benefits from your generosity, and you may also benefit with a tax deduction. Every dollar counts.

Exploiting Vector Instructions with Generalized Stream Fusion

Friday, December 22, 03:33 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Exploiting Vector Instructions with Generalized Stream Fusion By Geoffrey Mainland, Roman Leshchinskiy, and Simon Peyton Jones. A.k.a. "Haskell beats C". Our ideas are implemented in modified versions of the GHC compiler and vector library. Benchmarks show that high-level Haskell code written using our compiler and libraries can produce code that is faster than both

Making container technology work for persistent microservices

Thursday, December 21, 20:01 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In the technology realm, containers are an approach to running a compute environment, a bit like virtual machines (VM). Users typically prefer containers because they use resources more efficiently, start and stop much faster, and are less expensive to maintain. IBM Research co-developed Ubiquity with the IBM Cloud Storage Solutions team with the objective of […] The post Making container techno

The Big Idea: TED’s 4 step guide to the holiday season

Thursday, December 21, 19:35 UTC @ TED Blog

More charmingly referred to as a garbage fire that just keeps burning, 2017 has been a tough, relentless year of tragedy and strife. As we approach the holiday season, it’s important to connect and reconnect with those you love and want in your life. So, in these last few weeks of the year, here are […]

A photograph by Paul Nicklen shows the tragedy of extinction, and more news from TED speakers

Thursday, December 21, 17:39 UTC @ TED Blog

The past few weeks have brimmed over with TED-related news. Here, some highlights: This is what extinction looks like. Photographer Paul Nicklen shocked the world with footage of a starving polar bear that he and members of his conservation group SeaLegacy captured in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. “It rips your heart out of your chest,” [

Having Faith in Complexity

Thursday, December 21, 15:14 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I believe P ≠ NP as much as anyone else. Nevertheless should we worry about trust we put in complexity? You don't need the full power of P = NP to break cryptography. I don't worry about quantum computers breaking RSA and related protocols. It won't sneak up on us--when (or if) quantum computing gets anywhere close to factoring large numbers, we'll figure out a strategy to change our protocols and to protect the information we already have. However if someone comes up with an algorithm tomorr

New Research: Unlocking the secrets of Huntington’s Disease

Thursday, December 21, 14:01 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating neurological disorder that causes death in neurons – a major component of the brain – and eventually the loss of physical and mental abilities. Currently, there are only very limited treatment options. IBM and CHDI Foundation have published research in the Journal of American Chemical Society1 detailing structural features […] The post New

Top five math posts of 2017

Thursday, December 21, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

These have been the most popular math-related posts here this year. Golden powers are nearly integers How efficient is Morse code? Finding numbers in pi Common words used as technical terms Sierpinski triangle strikes again See also a list of the top five computing-related posts.

Updated Guidelines Now Available

Thursday, December 21, 00:30 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

The App Store Review Guidelines have been updated. We review all apps submitted to the App Store in an effort to determine whether they are reliable, perform as expected, and are free of offensive material. As you plan and develop your app, make sure to use these updated guidelines.Read the App Store Review Guidelines.

WKWebView Workarounds

Wednesday, December 20, 23:23 UTC @ inessential.com

In Evergreen I’m using WKWebView instead of WebView, because it’s the new and improved WebKit view. NSHipster writes: Boasting responsive 60fps scrolling, built-in gestures, streamlined communication between app and webpage, and the same JavaScript engine as Safari, WKWebView is one of the most significant announcements to come out of WWDC 2014.

Nearshore Software Development: Holidays in Costa Rica

Wednesday, December 20, 18:33 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

It has now been just over 8 weeks since I’ve been working out of our Costa Rica nearshore software development office, and I really enjoy it. I’m learning more and more Spanish each day from our on-staff Language Teacher, through different things I read and hear, as well as just speaking it in stores and […] The post Nearshore Software Development: Holidays in Costa Rica appeare

Hermite polynomials, expected values, and integration

Wednesday, December 20, 17:53 UTC @ John D. Cook

In the previous post, I alluded to using Hermite polynomials in conjunction with higher-order Laplace approximation. In this post I’ll expand on what that means. Hermite polynomials are orthogonal polynomials over the real line with respect to the weight given by the standard normal distribution. (There are two conventions for defining Hermite polynomials, what Wikipedia […]

The 5 Most Impactful BoSTalks of 2017

Wednesday, December 20, 15:14 UTC @ Business of Software USA

There are over 170 published talks from Business of Software Conferences available to watch right now. That’s a lot of talks. Tens of Thousands of hours worth of Business of Software talks were watched this year. New talks, old talks, short talks, long talks. Out of those 170, which talks did the good people of the Business […] The post The 5 Most Impactful BoSTalks of 2017 appea

Higher-order Laplace approximation

Wednesday, December 20, 14:58 UTC @ John D. Cook

Yesterday’s post presented the most common form of Laplace approximation, the second order version, and mentioned in passing that there are higher order versions. The extension to higher order is not trivial, so post gives a high level overview of how you’d do it. The previous post looked at integrating exp( log( g(x) ) ) by […]

Laplace approximation of an integral from Bayesian logistic regression

Tuesday, December 19, 20:36 UTC @ John D. Cook

Define and This integral comes up in Bayesian logisitic regression with a uniform (improper) prior. We will use this integral to illustrate a simple case of Laplace approximation. The idea of Laplace approximation is to approximate the integral of a Gaussian-like function by the integral of a (scaled) Gaussian with the same mode and same […]

Lightning Talk – Life In A Van | Tim Dobson, Formisimo | BoS Europe 2017

Tuesday, December 19, 14:24 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Tim Dobson, Senior Account Manager, Formisimo Tim Dobson is a homeowner and drives a Mercedes. An undeniably true statement. However… He lives in a van. Voluntarily. In an attempt to escape the trappings of the life of being young and employed in technology, Tim moved out of his house and into a Mercedes Sprinter – his new […] The post Lightning Talk – Life In A Van | Tim D

Apple Watch HealthKit Developer Tutorial: How to Build a Workout App

Tuesday, December 19, 09:20 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Introduction to Workout Apps Having a healthier lifestyle is a challenge for many people; most of the time it is because we forget to stand up and move. That is why workout and exercise apps are having a lot of success in the App Store. It is a market that moves millions of dollars a […] The post Apple Watch HealthKit Developer Tutorial: How to Build a Workout App a

Decomposing Emoji

Tuesday, December 19, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Now that emoji are common everywhere, we need to be aware of unicode, even without an international userbase. For example, the emoji 👨‍👩‍👧‍👦 (a family of four glyph) has a very different length across String implementations: "👨‍👩‍👧‍👦".count // 1 ("👨‍👩‍👧‍👦" as NSString).length // 11 Javascript also evaluates to 11. In Ruby "👨‍👩‍👧‍👦".length evaluates to 7, and in Python 2

Trasteja

Monday, December 18, 22:29 UTC @ brucknerite

Deja su tarjeta de visita —inútil de no ser porque integraba en ella una inusualmente nutrida funcionalidad de tarjeta de memoria— sobre el mostrador mientras se presenta como un consumado comercial con palabras que le describen como consultor financiero twodotzero; tal inopinada entrada le habría granjeado en otro lugar tarjeta roja y expulsión automáticas, pero … Continúa leyendo Trast

How to import a C library in Swift using the Swift Package Manager

Monday, December 18, 21:18 UTC @ Ole Begemann

This is an excerpt from the Interoperability chapter in our book Advanced Swift. The new edition, revised and extended for Swift 4, is out now. Swift is great at interoperating with C code, but the initial step of importing a C library such that the Swift compiler can see the C declarations can be quite tricky. This is a step-by-step tutorial how to do this using the

Changing Xcode Header Comment

Monday, December 18, 14:34 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Have you ever wanted to change the standard header comment that Xcode automatically puts at the top of ever new source file you add to a project? Maybe you just don’t like the default or need to include your own copyright or license text. Xcode 9 added a FILEHEADER text macro to allow you to do just that. FILEHEADER Text Macro When you add a new source file to Xcode 9 it expands the contents of the FILEHEADER text macro

Top five computing blog posts of 2017

Monday, December 18, 13:49 UTC @ John D. Cook

These have been the most popular computing-related posts here this year. Programming language life expectancy SHA1 no longer recommended, but hardly a failure The most disliked programming language Improving on the Unix shell One practical application of functional programming I plan to post a list of the top file math-related posts soon.

Get your protons right!

Monday, December 18, 12:43 UTC @ Backreaction

The atomic nucleus consists of protons and neutrons. The protons and neutrons are themselves made of three quarks each, held together by gluons. That much is clear. But just how do the gluons hold the quarks together? The quarks and gluons interact through the strong nuclear force. The strong nuclear force does not have only one charge – like electromagnetism – but three charges. The charges

Get your protons right!

Monday, December 18, 12:43 UTC @ Backreaction

The atomic nucleus consists of protons and neutrons. The protons and neutrons are themselves made of three quarks each, held together by gluons. That much is clear. But just how do the gluons hold the quarks together? The quarks and gluons interact through the strong nuclear force. The strong nuclear force does not have only one charge – like electromagnetism – but three charges. The charges

Is Spring the Sole Reason why Java is Becoming the new COBOL?

Monday, December 18, 11:46 UTC @ APIDesign - Blogs

Is there anything good on Spring that wouldn't be seen ridiculous by non-enterprise-Java users? --JaroslavTulach 11:46, 18 December 2017 (UTC)

Monkey First!

Monday, December 18, 03:18 UTC @ Computational Complexity

The following story is not true nor has anyone claimed its true, but it has a point: A company gets a contract to do the following: train a monkey to sit on a 10-foot pedestal and recite some passages of Shakespeare. After a week they announce they have made progress! They invite their investors to see what progress they have made! They unveil a curtain and there is... a 10-foot pedestal. This story was in an article about how Google does moonshots-- that is, high-ris

Truth From Zero?

Monday, December 18, 02:42 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

How we might compare AlphaZero against standards of perfection YouTube 2015 lecture source David Silver is the lead author on the paper, “Mastering Chess and Shogi by Self-Play with a General Reinforcement Learning Algorithm,” which was posted twelve days go on the ArXiv. It announces an algorithm called AlphaZero that, given the rules of any […]

The top reasons apps get rejected on the App Store

Monday, December 18, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Whether you’re a beginning iOS developer or a seasoned pro, you’ve no doubt encountered an App Store rejection at one point in your career (and if you haven’t, then you must be a very lucky person). In this article, I’m going to discuss some of the top reasons that apps get rejected on the App Store. Many of the rules that governed the App Store in the early days have changed and continue to be refined as Apple gauges their impact. A prudent developer always keeps an eye on the latest cha

Latest on abc

Saturday, December 16, 23:30 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I’ve seen reports today (see here and here) that indicate that Mochizui’s IUT papers, which are supposed to contain a proof of the abc conjecture, have been accepted by the journal Publications of the RIMS. Some of the sources for … Continue reading →

The Threats to the Net

Saturday, December 16, 20:52 UTC @ bit-player

My first glimpse of the World Wide Web came in 1993 on a visit to Fermilab, the physics playground near Chicago. Tom Nash, head of the computing division, showed me a screenful of text with a few highlighted phrases. When … Continue reading →

Scholarship versus research

Saturday, December 16, 15:32 UTC @ John D. Cook

One of the things about academia that most surprised and disappointed me was the low regard for scholarship. Exploration is tolerated as long as it results in a profusion of journal articles, and of course grant money, but is otherwise frowned upon. For example, I know someone who ruined his academic career by writing a massive […]

The 600-Cell (Part 1)

Saturday, December 16, 01:44 UTC @ Azimuth

I can’t stop thinking about the 600-cell: It’s a ‘Platonic solid in 4 dimensions’ with 600 tetrahedral faces and 120 vertices. One reason I like it is that you can think of these vertices as forming a group: a double cover of the rotational symmetry group of the icosahedron. Another reason is that it’s a […]

Illustrator Arik Roper hacks the creative process

Friday, December 15, 22:15 UTC @ x.ai

We recently rolled out a new, retro-futuristic look, featuring illustrations by artist Arik Roper. We chatted about his process and productivity hacks. The post Illustrator Arik Roper hacks the creative process appeared first on x.ai.

Ben Saunders’ solo crossing of Antarctica, and more news from TED speakers

Friday, December 15, 20:06 UTC @ TED Blog

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A solo crossing of Antarctica. With chilling detail, Ben Saunders documents his journey across Antarctica as he attempts to complete the first successful solo, unsupported and unassisted crossing. The journey is a way of honoring his friend Henry Worsley, […]

What Ruby Needs

Friday, December 15, 17:20 UTC @ tecosystems

Of all of the questions we receive at RedMonk, one of the most common concerns programming languages. Specifically, what is a given language’s trajectory? Is it going up or down? The answer to which is met, typically, by two follow up questions: first, what are the reasons for that direction, and second, can it be

What Ruby Needs

Friday, December 15, 17:20 UTC @ tecosystems

Of all of the questions we receive at RedMonk, one of the most common concerns programming languages. Specifically, what is a given language’s trajectory? Is it going up or down? The answer to which is met, typically, by two follow up questions: first, what are the reasons for that direction, and second, can it be

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 December 2017

Friday, December 15, 16:54 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Just two weeks left in 2017! Let's review the many things that the Apache Community has been working over the past week: Support Apache –in the final days of the year, please consider making an individual donation or encouraging your employer to participate in our many Corporate Giving options, from ASF Sponsorship to Matching Gifts and more. Not only does Apache benefit from your contribution, you may also benefit with a tax deduction. Every dollar counts.

Friday Q&A 2017-12-08: Type Erasure in Swift

Friday, December 15, 14:09 UTC @ NSBlog

You might have heard the term type erasure. You might have even used type-erased types in the standard library, such as AnySequence. But what exactly is type erasure and how do you do it yourself? In this article, I'll explore type erasure, why you'd want it, and how to make it happen, a topic suggested by Lorenzo Boaro. (Read More)

A view construction syntax

Friday, December 15, 12:35 UTC @ Cocoa with Love on Cocoa with Love

In this article, I’m going to look at constructing Cocoa views in code. On its own, that’s not a particularly daring idea but I’m going to use a unique syntax to aid the process: UITextField( .text -- model.

Task automation in Swift with Sake

Friday, December 15, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

In the past are those days when you automated your tasks using Make, Rake or Fastlane. These tools provided an interface and tools to automate certain tasks in our projects. Each of them had their strenghs and weaknesses. If we take Make, for instance, it requires some bash knowledge, but on the other side, it is more robust than the other solution (it doesn’t depend on anything that is not in your system). Rake or Fastlane made the definition of our tasks easier using a more readable language

Exploring the boundaries of legacy at TED@Westpac

Thursday, December 14, 17:10 UTC @ TED Blog

Legacy is a delightfully complex concept, and it's one that the TED@Westpac curators took on with gusto for the daylong event held in Sydney, Australia, on Monday December 11th. Themed around the idea of "The Future Legacy," the day was packed with speakers who took on topics ranging from education to work-health balance to designer babies.

Intellectual onramps

Thursday, December 14, 15:09 UTC @ John D. Cook

Tyler Cowen’s latest blog post gives advice for learning about modern China. He says that “books about sequences of dynasties are mind-numbing and not readily absorbed” and recommends finding other entry points before reading about dynasties. Find an “entry point” into China of independent intrinsic interest to you, be it basketball, artificial intelligence, Chinese opera, […]

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0 General Availability

Thursday, December 14, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Ubiquitous Open Source enterprise framework maintains decade-long leading role in $100B annual Big Data market Forest Hill, MD —14 December 2017— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, today announced Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0, the latest version of the Open Source software framework for reliable, scal

The Impact of Blockchain Technology Part 1: What Is It?

Thursday, December 14, 10:15 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

An Introduction to Blockchain Technology In 2017, you would have to be living on a remote tropical island (Isla del Coco) without internet access or periodicals to not have heard about bitcoin.  Even at 9 years old, it’s still nascent,  yet it has spurred a frenzy (bubble some would say) the likes of which the […] The post The Impact of Blockchain Technology Part 1: What Is It? appeared first on

iTunes Connect Holiday Schedule

Thursday, December 14, 01:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

As a reminder, new apps and app updates will not be accepted December 23 to 27 (Pacific Time), so any releases should be submitted, approved, and scheduled in advance. Other iTunes Connect and developer account features will remain available.Learn more about preparing apps for the App Store.

What’s new for December 2017

Wednesday, December 13, 23:34 UTC @ x.ai

We’re constantly pushing updates to Amy + Andrew to help them better understand you, improve their accuracy, & deliver new features. Here are the key updates we’ve made over the past month. The post What’s new for December 2017 appeared first on x.ai.

Our AI future: The Good and the Ugly

Wednesday, December 13, 18:46 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I don’t directly work in machine learning but one cannot deny the progress it has made and the effect it has on society. Who would have thought even a few years ago that ML would have basically solved face and voice recognition and translate nearly as well as humans. The Neural Information Process Systems conference held last week in Long Beach, California, sold out its 7500 registration slots in 12 days. NIPS, not long ago just another academic conference, has

Approximate quantum computing: from advantage to applications

Wednesday, December 13, 14:33 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Photo by IBM Fellow Charles Bennett Last week at our third Think Q conference at the Thomas J Watson Research Center, industry and academic leaders in quantum computing met to tackle questions about how to bridge the divide between the theory of quantum algorithms and practical applications that can run on today’s approximate (non-fault tolerant) […] The post Approximat

The RedMonk re:Invent 2017 Recap

Wednesday, December 13, 14:23 UTC @ tecosystems

Following up on the recent Amazon Web Services conference, re:Invent, held at the Palazzo and Venetian in Las Vegas, the three monks who attended got together to chat about what we saw and the conference and what it means for AWS, developers and the rest of the industry. The conversation is lightly edited for content

The RedMonk re:Invent 2017 Recap

Wednesday, December 13, 14:23 UTC @ tecosystems

Following up on the recent Amazon Web Services conference, re:Invent, held at the Palazzo and Venetian in Las Vegas, the three monks who attended got together to chat about what we saw and the conference and what it means for AWS, developers and the rest of the industry. The conversation is lightly edited for content

Get All The Talks From BoS Europe 2017 Immediately

Wednesday, December 13, 11:58 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Get all 18 brilliant talks from Business of Software Europe 2017 immediately. We’ll be releasing these online one-by-one over the course of the year, but you can get them sent straight to you inbox right now. You can download the videos so you can watch wherever you are – on a train, plane, that coffee […] The post Get All The Talks From BoS Europe 2017 Immediately appeared

Cluster Scheduling for Data Centers

Wednesday, December 13, 11:09 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

This installment of Research for Practice features a curated selection from Malte Schwarzkopf, who takes us on a tour of distributed cluster scheduling, from research to practice, and back again. With the rise of elastic compute resources, cluster management has become an increasingly hot topic in systems R&D, and a number of competing cluster managers including Kubernetes, Mesos, and Docker are currently jockeying for the crown in this space.

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Mnemonic™ as a Top-Level Project

Wednesday, December 13, 11:03 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Open Source storage-class memory oriented durable object platform for Java application developers in use across an array of industries that include eCommerce, Financial Services, and Semiconductors, among others. Forest Hill, MD —13 December 2017— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today that Apache®

Research perversions are spreading. You will not like the proposed solution.

Tuesday, December 12, 15:15 UTC @ Backreaction

The ivory tower from The Neverending Story Science has a problem. The present organization of academia discourages research that has tangible outcomes, and this wastes a lot of money. Of course scientific research is not exclusively pursued in academia, but much of basic research is. And if basic research doesn’t move forward, science by large risks getting stuck. At the root of the problem

Research perversions are spreading. You will not like the proposed solution.

Tuesday, December 12, 15:15 UTC @ Backreaction

The ivory tower from The Neverending Story Science has a problem. The present organization of academia discourages research that has tangible outcomes, and this wastes a lot of money. Of course scientific research is not exclusively pursued in academia, but much of basic research is. And if basic research doesn’t move forward, science by large risks getting stuck. At the root of the problem

Interesting Probability on a VERY OLD TV show

Tuesday, December 12, 14:33 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I have posted about things I see in TV or Movies that are math or CS related: Do TV shows overestimate how much a genius can help solve crimes or make really good crystal meth which seems to be blue. YES, see here Do TV shows get math wrong. YES, see here and about 90% of the episodes of Numb3rs

Pruning AI networks without performance loss

Tuesday, December 12, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In a spotlight paper from the 2017 NIPS Conference, my team and I presented an AI optimization framework we call Net-Trim, which is a layer-wise convex scheme to prune a pre-trained deep neural network. Deep learning has become a method of choice for many AI applications, ranging from image recognition to language translation. Thanks to […] The post Pruning AI networks without performance loss appear

Efficiency is not associative for matrix multiplication

Tuesday, December 12, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Here’s a fact that has been rediscovered many times in many different contexts: The way you parenthesize matrix products can greatly change the time it takes to compute the product. This is important, for example, for the back propagation algorithm in deep learning. Let A, B, and C be matrices that are compatible for multiplication. Then (AB)C = A(BC). […]

Success at Apache: What a Long Strange (and Great) Trip It's Been

Tuesday, December 12, 12:10 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

By Jim Jagielski It is normally during this time of year that people get awful retrospective. We look over the last 12 months and come to terms with what kind of year it has been. We congratulate ourselves on the good and (hopefully) learn from the bad. We basically assess the ending year and start planning, even a little bit, on the one to come. In general, we reminisce. I am thinking not about 2017, however, but instead of 1995 and the origins of The Apach

ARKit Developer Tutorial: How To Build a Measuring App with Apple’s Augmented Reality SDK

Tuesday, December 12, 09:30 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

In this post, we are going to discuss the basic settings, commands and tools for Apple’s new augmented reality SDK, “ARKit,” available for iOS 11. In order to explain all the steps to build a basic app and use its functionality in ARKit, we will be creating a “shoe measuring app” that will measure the […] The post ARKit Developer Tutorial: How To Build a Measuring

Make Your Apps Available for Pre-Order

Tuesday, December 12, 00:20 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

You can now make your new apps available for pre-order on the App Store on all Apple platforms. Customers can see your product page and order your app before it’s released for download. Once your app is released, customers will be notified and it will automatically download to their device. Let your customers know your app is coming by using the pre-order badges in your marketing materials.Learn more about offering your apps for pre-order.

Offer Introductory Pricing for Your Subscriptions

Tuesday, December 12, 00:20 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

You can now offer new customers a discounted introductory price for your auto-renewable subscriptions on the App Store. Visit your in-app purchase page in iTunes Connect to configure introductory pricing and use new API additions in iOS 11.2 to localize and display introductory pricing details to your users.Learn more about offering introductory pricing.

Are companies highjacking our brains?

Tuesday, December 12, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

What Internet is doing to our brains is something I keep thinking about. Technology is thought to improve our lives. Among other, it connects us with people around the world or automates work that had to be done manually in the past. It is everywhere, not only on our computers or mobile devices but in our watch, in our TV, in the cars that we drive… Internet was a tremendous revolution, and a lot of companies are running their businesses on it. They offer all kind of services of which we are users:

A Quick Tip For String Performance

Tuesday, December 12, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In this new post series we’ll show highlights of Swift Talk, our subscription video series. Today, we’ll show a very nice trick by Ole Begemann to increase String processing performance. In Swift Talk 79, we try to improve CSV string parsing performance by measuring time and comparing the performance of various techniques. To write a performance test

Higher order Taylor series in several variables

Monday, December 11, 22:33 UTC @ John D. Cook

Most sources that present Taylor’s theorem for functions of several variables stop at second order terms. One reason is that one or two terms are good enough for many applications. But the bigger reason is that things get more complicated when you include higher order terms. The kth order term in Taylor’s theorem is a rank k […]

Various and Sundry

Monday, December 11, 20:35 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

A few things that may be of interest: Survey articles prepared for the 2018 ICM proceedings are starting to appear on the arXiv, and Peter Scholze (who will be getting a Fields Medal in Rio) has put his on his … Continue reading →

This Week’s Hype/Fake Physics

Monday, December 11, 18:44 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

On the Fake Physics front, Jerry Coyne at Why Evolution is True has a post claiming New evidence for the multiverse-and its implications. You would think that recent history should have made clear the danger of using Youtube videos as … Continue reading →

Distributing Control of Deep Learning Training Delivers 10x Performance Improvement

Monday, December 11, 18:12 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

My IBM Research AI team and I recently completed the first formal theoretical study of the convergence rate and communications complexity associated with a decentralized distributed approach in a deep learning training setting. The empirical evidence proves that in specific configurations, a decentralized approach can result in a 10x performance boost over a centralized approach […] The post

The Curious Case of the Duplicate Tracks

Monday, December 11, 16:00 UTC @ joe cieplinski

Over the years, the majority of my complaints about Apple have centered around music. That’s because I love music, and Apple clearly doesn’t always think enough about people outside of its contrived all-in-on-Apple-Music listener when it comes to the iTunes experience. Today’s complaint actually begins with a

Table View Separator Inset

Monday, December 11, 10:04 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

The table view separator is that thin line drawn by default between table view cells. You control how far it extends to the leading and trailing edges with the seperatorInset property. Since iOS 7 this has been an inset based on the table cell margins. In iOS 11 Apple changed that to inset from the cell edges by default. That makes it easier to extend to the full table width but if you have been using an inset you may want to check how it now looks on iOS 11.

From the Icosahedron to E8

Sunday, December 10, 18:27 UTC @ Azimuth

Here’s a draft of a little thing I’m writing for the Newsletter of the London Mathematical Society. The regular icosahedron is connected to many ‘exceptional objects’ in mathematics, and here I describe two ways of using it to construct One uses a subring of the quaternions called the ‘icosians’, while the other uses Patrick du […]

Excitonium

Sunday, December 10, 02:30 UTC @ Azimuth

In certain crystals you can knock an electron out of its favorite place and leave a hole: a place with a missing electron. Sometimes these holes can move around like particles. And naturally these holes attract electrons, since they are places an electron would want to be. Since an electron and a hole attract each […]

Evergreen Diary #2: Random Notes

Saturday, December 09, 20:57 UTC @ inessential.com

I’ve been working on Evergreen for about three years, and so I considered writing about playing such a long game — but then Daniel released MarsEdit 4.0 after seven years. I tip my fedora to the master. * * * But there is at least one difference: it’s taking so many years just to get to one-point-oh. I’ve never been on any kind of project that t

Why not? Pushing and prodding the possible, at TED@IBM

Saturday, December 09, 15:41 UTC @ TED Blog

We know that our world — our data, our lives, our countries — are becoming more and more connected. But what should we do with that? In two sessions of TED@IBM, the answer shaped up to be: Dream as big as you can. Speakers took the stage to pitch their ideas for using connected data […]

How can a statistician help a lawyer?

Saturday, December 09, 14:58 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ll be presenting at a webinar on Wednesday, December 13 at 1:00 PM Eastern. The title of the presentation is “Seven questions a statistician and answer for an attorney.” I will discuss, among other things, when common sense applies and when correct analysis can be counter-intuitive. There will be ample time at the end of […]

FreeBSD-SA-17:12.openssl

Saturday, December 09, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD Security Advisories

Get ready for TED Talks India: Nayi Soch, premiering Dec. 10 on Star Plus

Friday, December 08, 22:47 UTC @ TED Blog

TED is a global organization with a broad global audience. With our TED Translators program working in more than 100 languages, TEDx events happening every day around the world and so much more, we work hard to present the latest ideas for everyone, regardless of language, location or platform. Now we’ve embarked on a journey […]

Sudden Deaf

Friday, December 08, 22:17 UTC @ bit-player

My erstwhile employer, mentor, and dearest friend was Dennis Flanagan, who edited Scientific American for 37 years. He is the larger of the two aquatic specimens in the photograph below. One of the quirks of life with Dennis was that … Continue reading →

P=NP: Perhaps I Change My Mind

Friday, December 08, 19:55 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

An old result put a new way (in a now-fixed-up post) Albert Meyer knows circuit lower bounds. He co-authored a paper with the late Larry Stockmeyer that proves that small instances of the decision problem of a certain weak second-order logical theory require Boolean circuits with more gates than there are atoms in the observable […]

What’s Scary About Amazon Web Services

Friday, December 08, 18:34 UTC @ tecosystems

As has become routine at re:Invent, Amazon Web Services used the opportunity of its annual conference to shine a light on the fruits of a year’s worth of its labor. The product of which would represent years plural if not decades of almost any other company’s work, it must be said. Hundreds of new features,

What’s Scary About Amazon Web Services

Friday, December 08, 18:34 UTC @ tecosystems

As has become routine at re:Invent, Amazon Web Services used the opportunity of its annual conference to shine a light on the fruits of a year’s worth of its labor. The product of which would represent years plural if not decades of almost any other company’s work, it must be said. Hundreds of new features,

Recap: How to Use AI to Sell More

Friday, December 08, 16:37 UTC @ x.ai

x.ai hosted a webinar with CEO Dennis Mortensen and Troops CEO and Founder, Dan Reich, for a lively discussion on how AI can used to help you sell more. The post Recap: How to Use AI to Sell More appeared first on x.ai.

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 8 December 2017

Friday, December 08, 15:48 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Hello, Friday! This week the Apache Community has been working on: Support Apache –Corporate Giving programs often have end-of-year philanthropic goals: if your employer has a Matching Gifts program, please consider adding The Apache Software Foundation to your list of beneficiary organizations to increase your donations and their tax deduction. Every dollar counts. http://...

New AI algorithm recommends right products at the right time

Friday, December 08, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Consumers everywhere are exposed to AI algorithms that recommend products to them based on their past purchases and those of others. Of course, they don’t always hit the mark. My IBM Research AI colleagues, our academic collaborators and I recently developed a new algorithm able to provide more accurate, timely product recommendations. In a much-discussed, […] The post New AI algorithm rec

Default ColorSpaces

Friday, December 08, 04:25 UTC @ Miguel de Icaza

Recently a user filed a bug where the same RGB color when converted into a UIColor, and later into CGColor is different that going from the RGB value to a CGColor directly on recent versions of iOS. You can see the difference here: What is happening here is tha

The Omni Show episode #4 with Andrea McVittie, Omni Slack Group

Thursday, December 07, 21:21 UTC @ inessential.com

Yesterday we published an episode with Andrea McVittie, User Experience Designer at The Omni Group. Andrea will brook nae interference with the puppies. Be nice! She also talks a bit about how design works at Omni and about design and ethics. After we posted the episode, she followed up with a tweet where she codifies her ethica

Making interaction with AI systems more natural with textual grounding

Thursday, December 07, 17:33 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In an upcoming oral presentation at the 2017 Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) Conference, our teams from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and IBM Research AI have proposed a new supervised learning algorithm to solve a well-known problem in AI called textual grounding. Imagine you wanted to ask someone to hand you an object. […] The post Making interaction with AI systems more

Wigner Crystals

Thursday, December 07, 16:41 UTC @ Azimuth

I’d like to explain a conjecture about Wigner crystals, which we came up with in a discussion on Google+. It’s a purely mathematical conjecture that’s pretty simple to state, motivated by the picture above. But let me start at the beginning. Electrons repel each other, so they don’t usually form crystals. But if you trap […]

Razor's Edge

Thursday, December 07, 15:21 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Informally the sensitivity conjecture asks whether every hard Boolean function has a razor's edge input, where flipping a random bit has a reasonable chance of flipping the output. Let's be more precise. We consider functions f mapping {0,1}n to {0,1}. For every input x, the decision tree complexity at x is the least number of bits of x you would need to query to decide whether the function outputs 0 or 1. The decision tree complexity of a function is the maximum d

TJBot goes digital, and more playground adventures

Thursday, December 07, 13:39 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Last November we introduced TJBot – an open source, programmable cardboard robot powered by Watson services – to help demonstrate what’s possible with artificial intelligence. Outfitted with a camera, microphone, speaker, servo and LED, TJBot has charmed makers, developers, students and creators of all ages.  The global community of TJBot enthusiasts continues to grow, as […] The post TJBot goes di

App Store Best of 2017

Thursday, December 07, 12:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

Congratulations to the developers featured in the App Store Best of 2017. This showcase honors our favorite apps and games on the App Store, and celebrates the amazing experiences that developers have created for macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.See all the featured apps and games.

Evolution of a SaaS Marketing Team + AMA | Andrus Purde, Outfunnel | BoS Europe 2017

Thursday, December 07, 10:37 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Andrus Purde, Founder, Outfunnel People talk a lot about scaling SaaS, or scaling your hiring or culture. But what about marketing? How does your Marketing need to develop in line with the rest of the business? Andrus talks about the four distinct marketing stages your company will go through as it grows; and how, ironically, […] The post Evolution of

Computational Complexity as a Law of Nature

Thursday, December 07, 06:28 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

I have to admit I know nothing about this topic, however, it is, as far as I can say, one of the weirdest and most interesting recent developments in physics. It is also closely linked to computer science. Yet, I don't see it discussed in programming community at all. The idea is that, somehow, nature may be fundamentally limited in its computational capacity. That, in other words, it's not possible to compute NP-complete problems in polynomial time and that the hurdle is

FAQ for Product-Mode Thinking

Wednesday, December 06, 20:25 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Sriram has added a FAQ to address the common questions he runs into from people learning about using products rather than projects to organize software development efforts. more…

The Last Refuge of Cowards

Wednesday, December 06, 19:04 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

The talks and panel discussions from the 2018 Breakthrough Prize symposium are available via Facebook video. They ended with the following, from prize winner David Spergel: Well, alright, I’m going to say something that I probably shouldn’t say in Palo … Continue reading →

The future of hardware is AI

Wednesday, December 06, 19:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

AI workloads are different from the calculations most of our current computers are built to perform. AI implies prediction, inference, intuition. But the most creative machine learning algorithms are hamstrung by machines that can’t harness their power. Hence, if we’re to make great strides in AI, our hardware must change, too. Starting with GPUs, and […] The post The future of hardware is AI appe

String Theory Fails Another Test

Wednesday, December 06, 16:33 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Back in 2004, the KITP put out a press release (which I wrote about in an early blog post here) announcing that “Newly Devised Test May Confirm Strings as Fundamental Constituent of Matter, Energy”. The press release announced that Polchinski … Continue reading →

Reducing discrimination in AI with new methodology

Wednesday, December 06, 16:28 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

I finally had a chance to watch Hidden Figures on my long journey to Sydney, where I co-organized the second annual ICML Workshop on Human Interpretability (WHI).  The film poignantly illustrates how discriminating by race and gender to limit access to employment and education is suboptimal for a society that wants to achieve greatness.  Some […] The post Reducing discrimination in AI with new m

Future-Proof Dependency Injection for Storyboard-Based View Controllers

Wednesday, December 06, 15:05 UTC @ Arek Holko

One of the issues introduced by storyboards is that they make it impossible to pass dependencies to view controllers in initializers. I proposed an API modification in past that would allow for exactly that, but alas, it doesn’t seem to be high on the priority list for UIKit. I recently came up with a new approach leveraging code generation which I’m excite

The cosmological constant is not the worst prediction ever. It’s not even a prediction.

Wednesday, December 06, 12:58 UTC @ Backreaction

Think fake news and echo chambers are a problem only in political discourse? Think again. You find many examples of myths and falsehoods on popular science pages. Most of them surround the hype of the day, but some of them have been repeated so often they now appear in papers, seminar slides, and textbooks. And many scientists, I have noticed with alarm, actually believe them. I can’t say

The cosmological constant is not the worst prediction ever. It’s not even a prediction.

Wednesday, December 06, 12:58 UTC @ Backreaction

Think fake news and echo chambers are a problem only in political discourse? Think again. You find many examples of myths and falsehoods on popular science pages. Most of them surround the hype of the day, but some of them have been repeated so often they now appear in papers, seminar slides, and textbooks. And many scientists, I have noticed with alarm, actually believe them. I can’t say

Introducing Search Ads Basic

Tuesday, December 05, 23:30 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

Search Ads Basic is a new cost-per-install offering, ideal if you have limited time or expertise to promote your app. Put your app at the top of relevant search results on the App Store in the United States, with global expansion coming in fall 2018. Your first installs are free with a 100 USD credit.Learn more about Search Ads Basic.

Why Dictionary sometimes encodes itself as an array

Tuesday, December 05, 20:31 UTC @ Ole Begemann

This is a writeup of a Twitter conversation. You may have noticed that some dictionaries encode themselves as arrays in Swift’s Codable system — or more precisely, as

How dictionaries act as strong foundations for training AI systems

Tuesday, December 05, 15:46 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Similar to the way people consult dictionaries to define the meaning and context of words, artificial intelligence (AI) systems rely on good quality entity dictionaries or, more importantly, being able to build up-to-date ones for any given concept. In fact, in many Information Extraction (IE) tasks, a powerful building block for any sophisticated extraction is […] The post How dictionaries

Publishing in The Lancet’s EBioMedicine: New research in AI pushes frontiers in epileptic seizure prediction

Tuesday, December 05, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Today, The Lancet’s EBioMedicine journal will publish a study led by scientists from IBM Research-Australia and the University of Melbourne marking important progress in personalized seizure forecasting with AI. The findings, described in a paper titled ‘Epileptic Seizure Prediction using Big Data and Deep Learning: Toward a Mobile System,’ present new results in epileptic seizure […] The post

Black Friday Marketing & Revenue Report

Tuesday, December 05, 13:47 UTC @ Dan Counsell

If you run a business that sells digital products, you should probably be taking part in Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Consumers are in the right mindset and actively looking for deals. If you’ve never put your products on sale during this period, you’re missing out. Last year we launched Squash 2 around the time … Continue reading Black Friday Marketing &

Moment generating functions and connections to other things

Tuesday, December 05, 12:25 UTC @ John D. Cook

This post relates moment generating functions to the Laplace transform and to exponential generating functions. It also brings in connections to the z-transform and the Fourier transform. Thanks to Brian Borchers who suggested the subject of this post in a comment on a previous post on transforms and convolutions. Moment generating functions The moment generating function (MGF) of […]

Operational Excellence in April Fools' Pranks

Tuesday, December 05, 11:22 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Successful pranks require care and planning. Write a design proposal and a project plan. Involve operations early. If this is a technical change to your website, perform load testing, preferably including a "dark launch" or hidden launch test. Hide the prank behind a feature flag rather than requiring a new software release. Perform a retrospective and publish the results widely. Remember that some of the best pranks require little or no technical changes at all. For example, one could simply summarize the

Shannon wavelet

Tuesday, December 05, 04:45 UTC @ John D. Cook

The Shannon wavelet has an interesting plot: Given the complexity of the plot, the function definition is surprisingly simple: The Fourier transform is even simpler: it’s the indicator function of [-2π, -π] ∪ [π, 2π], i.e. the function that is 1 on the intervals [-2π, -π] and [π, 2π] but zero everywhere else. The Shannon […]

Fireside chat with Simons Inst Director Dick Karp

Tuesday, December 05, 04:00 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Fireside chat with Dick Karp Above link is Samir Khuller interviewing Dick Karp, though its labelled as a fireside chat with Dick Karp. Very interesting to hear how TCS has evolved. More generally its good to know where you've come from to have a better idea of where you're going. bill g.

Seven Deadly Signs That Your Software Project is in Hell

Tuesday, December 05, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

It takes the creative resources of an entire organization to ship a successful software product. Marketing, design, infrastructure and engineers must all come together in a technical ballet of brilliance and coordination. Proper organization of all these people and processes is not a solved formula. There is no development methodology that ensures success 100% of the time. Knowing this, what are some warning signs that things may not be going according to plan? There is no

Introducing Swift Talk Collections

Tuesday, December 05, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Dear all, With the annual Swift migration behind us, we’d like to take a moment to introduce something new: Collections, a beautifully designed way to browse our weekly Swift Talk episodes. Curated around topics, each Collection acts as a series, threading together related episodes. Perhaps you’d like to know more about

Inadequate Equilibria

Monday, December 04, 16:52 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

When I was an adolescent, maybe 18 years old, I was hit over the head with the realization that we have no say in our survival as species. Evolution is going to progress in a way that maximizes multiplication and our beliefs, our cleverness, our science, our will to sacrifice personal wellbeing to the benefit of all is not going to change that a bit. I was never able to communicate the horror of being at the mercy of cold and uncaring, non-sentient in fact, forces of natu

IBM scientists demonstrate 10x faster large-scale machine learning using GPUs

Monday, December 04, 16:24 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Together with EPFL scientists, our IBM Research team has developed a scheme for training big data sets quickly. It can process a 30 Gigabyte training dataset in less than one minute using a single graphics processing unit (GPU) — a 10× speedup over existing methods for limited memory training. The results, which efficiently utilize the […] The post IBM scientists demonstrate 10x faster large-scale ma

Using Neural Networks to Predict Outcomes of Organic Chemistry

Monday, December 04, 16:23 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

For more than 200 years, the synthesis of organic molecules has remained one of the most important tasks in organic chemistry. The work of chemists has scientific and commercial implications that range from the production of Aspirin to that of Nylon. Yet, little has been done to change age-old practices dramatically and allow a new […] The post Using Neural Networks to Predict Outcomes of O

Using Tally

Monday, December 04, 14:01 UTC @ joe cieplinski

I was recently asked on Twitter for practical examples of how I use Tally, made by Greg Pierce of Agile Tortoise. My response is way too long, even for the new 280-character limit, though, so I thought I’d write it up here. Note: This is not a paid endorsement.<

Helping AI master video understanding

Monday, December 04, 04:58 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

I am part of the team at the MIT IBM Watson AI Lab that is carrying out fundamental AI research to push the frontiers of core technologies that will advance the state-of-the-art in AI video comprehension. This is just one example of joint research we’re pursuing together to produce innovations in AI technology that solve […] The post Helping AI master video understanding appeared first on

Transforms and Convolutions

Monday, December 04, 00:55 UTC @ John D. Cook

There are many theorems of the form where f and g are functions, T is an integral transform, and * is a kind of convolution. In words, the transform of a convolution is the product of transforms. When the transformation changes, the notion of convolution changes. Here are three examples. Fourier transform and convolution With the Fourier transform […]

Developer Review: 2017 MacBook 12

Saturday, December 02, 06:51 UTC @ Cocoa Is My Girlfriend

After much consideration and review, I recently purchased a 2017 MacBook. No, not a MacBook Pro 13 or 15. I purchased the 12 inch MacBook. The small laptop that people say over and over again cannot be used for development. This is a living review of that MacBook as used by a macOS/iOS developer. How […]

Suicide by Culture

Saturday, December 02, 06:33 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

At the end of 1950's my great-grandmother was the last inhabitant of the family farm. One day she locked the door and went away never to return. When we visited the place couple of years ago, the easiest way to get there was to drive to the closest village, then proceed by foot. We had to pass through some fields, then through a forest. Finally, we've descended into a swampy gorge overgrown with vegetation. The path was barely passable. Blackberries and nettles were growing ever

64-bit Requirement for Mac Apps

Friday, December 01, 21:30 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

As a reminder, new apps submitted to the Mac App Store must support 64-bit starting January 2018, and Mac app updates and existing apps must support 64-bit starting June 2018. If you distribute your apps outside the Mac App Store, we highly recommend distributing 64-bit binaries to make sure your users can continue to run your apps on future versions of macOS. The last macOS release to support 32-bit apps without compromise is macOS High Sierra.Learn more about distributing Mac apps.

IBM Research showcases AI advances @ NIPS 2017

Friday, December 01, 21:28 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

At the 2017 NIPS conference in Long Beach, CA, IBM will showcase new advances from its AI research team via technical papers as well as results from the company’s ongoing collaboration with academic institutions through the MIT IBM Watson AI Lab and the AI Horizons Network. IBM and MIT scientists will unveil and publish a […] The post IBM Research showcases AI advances @ NIPS 2017 appeared

/u/matthieum on The main selling point of rust is this (and got to code rust at work)

Friday, December 01, 20:43 UTC @ gilded : rust

Note for future readers: if like me you ponder for a while what "tolls" Rust imposes that other languages don't... read it as "tools" and it'll all become much clearer! So... today a coworker and I decided to track down why, in our C++ codebase, for some reason, an IP address was appearing in our logs instead of the business unit that it should have been (an optional property). The first and most obvious issue would h

Brand-new TED Talks from TEDWomen 2017: A note from the curator

Friday, December 01, 20:06 UTC @ TED Blog

This year’s TEDWomen in New Orleans was a truly special conference, at a vital moment, and I’m sure the ripples will be felt for a long time to come. The theme this year was bridges: we build them, we cross them, sometimes we even burn them. Our speakers talked about the physical bridges we need […]

Member of the Band – Alan Wong .NET Developer

Friday, December 01, 17:41 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Alan Wong .NET Developer appeared first on

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 1 December 2017

Friday, December 01, 16:05 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

We're at the final stretch of the year --happy December! Let's review what we've been up to over the past week: Support Apache –Adobe, Bloomberg, and Google are among the organizations who match or exceed the contributions made by their employees. If your employer has a Matching Gifts program, please consider adding The Apache Software Foundation to your list of beneficiary organizations. Every dollar counts. http://...

Three times the Internet Archive helped me this year

Friday, December 01, 05:56 UTC @ composition.al

Recently I remarked on Twitter, “I should donate to archive.org more. They’re how I know that large parts of my own past actually happened.” By “archive.org” I meant the Internet Archive, the organization that runs the Wayback Machine and many other projects. Here are three stories from 2017 about

Breakthroughs: The talks of TED@Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Friday, December 01, 01:12 UTC @ TED Blog

Humanity is defined by its immense body of knowledge. Most times it inches forward, shedding light onto the mysteries of the universe and easing life’s endeavors in small increments. But in some special moments, knowledge and understanding leap forward, when one concentrated mind or one crucial discovery redirects the course of things and changes the […]

The Apache Software Foundation Operations Summary: August - October 2017

Friday, December 01, 00:02 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

FOUNDATION OPERATIONS SUMMARY Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 2018 (August - October 2017) "As a large Cloud Infrastructure company, LeaseWeb relies on a number of Open Source technologies to deliver our services. The activities of The Apache Software Foundation –and in our case, the Apache CloudStack