Uncut Interview with Sam Altman on Masters of Scale

Friday, February 23, 17:45 UTC @ Y Combinator

Reid Hoffman interviews Sam Altman in this uncut interview from the Masters of Scale podcast.

Accessible Frames

Friday, February 23, 17:41 UTC @ Indie Stack

I love the macOS system-wide dictionary lookup feature. If you’re not familiar with this, just hold down the Control, Command, and D keys while hovering with the mouse cursor over a word, and the definition appears. What’s amazing about this feature is it works virtually everwyhere on the system, even in apps where the developers … Continue reading Accessible Frames

How Google Cloud Storage offers strongly consistent object listing thanks to Spanner

Friday, February 23, 17:13 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Zhihong Yao, Software Engineer, Google Cloud Storage Here at Google Cloud, we're proud of the fact that, all of our listing operations are consistent across Google Cloud Storage. They're consistent across all Cloud Storage bucket locations, including regional and multi-regional buckets. They're consistent whether you're listing buckets in a project or listing objects within a bucket. If you cre

How to Survive a Hackathon

Friday, February 23, 16:28 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

What makes a good ICO (Initial Coin Offering)?

Friday, February 23, 16:12 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Design Spin Builds a React Website with Cosmic JS

Friday, February 23, 15:54 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

An Ode to Experimental Design

Friday, February 23, 15:51 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is finally here. How far will it go?

Friday, February 23, 15:48 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In late 2017, IBM successfully launched the next era of high-performance cognitive and AI hardware with the deployment of its POWER9 technology in the Summit and Sierra supercomputers, the most powerful supercomputers in the world to date.  Not to be outdone, IBM also launched the next era of constant-encryption mainframes, with the popular release of […] The post Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography

The Uprooting of Mind: Can AI Save Us?

Friday, February 23, 15:38 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 23 February 2018

Friday, February 23, 15:16 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

We're closing out the month with the following activities from the Apache community: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 21 March. Board calendar and minutes http://... ApacheCon™ –the ASF's official global conference series. - Travel A

Un astrónomo aficionado observa los primeros instantes de una supernova IIb

Friday, February 23, 13:29 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El argentino Víctor Buso, astrónomo aficionado, observó los primeros instantes de la explosión de supernova SN 2016gkg en la galaxia NGC 613. Siendo la serendipia uno de los motores de la astronomía, Buso es coautor del artículo en Nature […] Leer más

Setting up email verification in FeathersJS

Friday, February 23, 11:51 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

The Inner Game of Crypto

Friday, February 23, 11:46 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

La conformación de la P-glicoproteína ligada a ATP determinada con criomicroscopia electrónica

Friday, February 23, 09:41 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Muchos tumores cancerosos se hacen resistentes a la quimioterapia gracias a proteínas transportadoras de la membrana celular, como la p-glicoproteína (Pgp), que actúan como bombas de expulsión. Las Pgp expulsan una sustancia intracelular fuera de la célula maligna cuando […]

Charla en Escépticos en el Pub Madrid

Friday, February 23, 09:37 UTC @ brucknerite

El pasado día 10 de febrero di una charla en el evento Escépticos en el Pub Madrid, organizado por la ARP: Sociedad para el Avance del Pensamiento Crítico. Bajo el título «Por un clavo» repasé algunas de las bases del pensamiento moderno sobre sistemas de transporte, seguridad y análisis de accidentes. El turno de preguntas fue … Continúa leyendo Charla en Esc

Escaping Hell with Monads (2017)

Friday, February 23, 09:27 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 206# Comments: 146

A Double Conference

Friday, February 23, 07:37 UTC @ Azimuth

Here’s a cool way to cut carbon emissions: a double conference. The idea is to have a conference in two faraway locations connected by live video stream, to reduce the amount of long-distance travel! Even better, it’s about a great subject: • Higher algebra and mathematical physics, August 13–17, 2018, Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, Canada, and […]

Aura

Friday, February 23, 03:13 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alastair Houghton on the story behind Aura, a new utility he’s just released that allows any Mac to output 5.1 surround sound. Long story short, he spent a year working on it but was on the cusp of shelving it, unreleased, due to licensing problems. It was saved only through serendipity. I don’t want to say any more — it’s a great story.

The Children Who Mine Cobalt

Friday, February 23, 02:46 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alex Crawford, reporting for Sky News: At one cobalt mine, children toiled in the drenching rain carrying huge sacks of the mineral. Dorsen, eight, had no shoes and told us he hadn’t made enough money to eat for the past two days - despite working for about 12 hours a day. His friend Richard, 11, talked about how his whole body ached every day from the tough physical work. […] The mine tunnels are dug by hand by miners who have no protective equipment. The tu

‘Unsane’ — New Steven Soderbergh Film Shot Entirely on iPhone

Friday, February 23, 02:38 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Reuters: Soderbergh said the overall experience of making a film on an iPhone was good, although there were some drawbacks such as the phone being very sensitive to vibrations. “I have to say the positives for me really were significant and it’s going to be tricky to go back to a more conventional way of shooting,” he said. Not having to make a hole in a wall or secure a camera to the ceiling are big advantages, as is being able to go straight from watching a rehea

Why Facebook Won’t Ever Change

Friday, February 23, 02:34 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Om Malik: Google’s core DNA is search and engineering, though some would say engineering that is driven by the economics of search, which makes it hard for the company to see the world through any other lens. Apple’s lens is that of product, design, and experience. This allows it to make great phones and to put emphasis on privacy, but makes it hard for them to build data-informed services. Facebook’s DNA is that of a social platform addicted to growth and engagement. At

‘Gun Rights, “Positive Good”, and the Evolution of Mutually Assured Massacre’

Friday, February 23, 01:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Must-read column by Josh Marshall on how the false notion that more guns make us safer — which has now come to the absurd point where the president of the United States is endorsing the notion of arming schoolteachers — came to be. ★

Communication Efficient Checking of Big Data Operations. (arXiv:1710.08255v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We propose fast probabilistic algorithms with low (i.e., sublinear in the input size) communication volume to check the correctness of operations in Big Data processing frameworks and distributed databases. Our checkers cover many of the commonly used operations, including sum, average, median, and minimum aggregation, as well as sorting, union, merge, and zip. An experimental evaluation of our implementation in Thrill (Bingmann et al., 2016) confirms the low overhead and high failure detection rate pred

Improved Massively Parallel Computation Algorithms for MIS, Matching, and Vertex Cover. (arXiv:1802.08237v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We present $O(\log\log n)$-round algorithms in the Massively Parallel Computation (MPC) model, with $\tilde{O}(n)$ memory per machine, that compute a maximal independent set, a $1+\epsilon$ approximation of maximum matching, and a $2+\epsilon$ approximation of minimum vertex cover, for any $n$-vertex graph and any constant $\epsilon>0$. These improve the state of the art as follows: -- Our MIS algorithm leads to a simple $O(\log\log \Delta)$-round MIS algorithm in the Congested Clique model of

Communication Complexity of One-Shot Remote State Preparation. (arXiv:1802.07795v1 [quant-ph])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

Quantum teleportation uses prior shared entanglement and classical communication to send an unknown quantum state from one party to another. Remote state preparation (RSP) is a similar distributed task in which the sender knows the entire classical description of the state to be sent. (This may also be viewed as the task of non-oblivious compression of a single sample from an ensemble of quantum states.) We study the communication complexity of approximate remote state preparation, in which the goal is t

Multiplicative Complexity of Vector Valued Boolean Functions. (arXiv:1407.6169v3 [cs.CC] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

We consider the multiplicative complexity of Boolean functions with multiple bits of output, studying how large a multiplicative complexity is necessary and sufficient to provide a desired nonlinearity. For so-called $\Sigma\Pi\Sigma$ circuits, we show that there is a tight connection between error correcting codes and circuits computing functions with high nonlinearity. Combining this with known coding theory results, we show that functions with $n$ inputs and $n$ outputs with the highest possible nonli

The Clever Shopper Problem. (arXiv:1802.07944v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We investigate a variant of the so-called "Internet Shopping Problem" introduced by Blazewicz et al. (2010), where a customer wants to buy a list of products at the lowest possible total cost from shops which offer discounts when purchases exceed a certain threshold. Although the problem is NP-hard, we provide exact algorithms for several cases, e.g. when each shop sells only two items, and an FPT algorithm for the number of items, or for the number of shops when all prices are equal. We complement each

Finding Top-k Optimal Sequenced Routes -- Full Version. (arXiv:1802.08014v1 [cs.DB])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Motivated by many practical applications in logistics and mobility-as-a-service, we study the top-k optimal sequenced routes (KOSR) querying on large, general graphs where the edge weights may not satisfy the triangle inequality, e.g., road network graphs with travel times as edge weights. The KOSR querying strives to find the top-k optimal routes (i.e., with the top-k minimal total costs) from a given source to a given destination, which must visit a number of vertices with specific vertex categories (e

Projection-Free Online Optimization with Stochastic Gradient: From Convexity to Submodularity. (arXiv:1802.08183v1 [stat.ML])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Online optimization has been a successful framework for solving large-scale problems under computational constraints and partial information. Current methods for online convex optimization require either a projection or exact gradient computation at each step, both of which can be prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. At the same time, there is a growing trend of non-convex optimization in machine learning community and a need for online methods. Continuous submodular functions, which exh

Efficient Enumeration of Dominating Sets for Sparse Graphs. (arXiv:1802.07863v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Dominating sets are fundamental graph structures. However, enumeration of dominating sets has not received much attention. This study aims to propose two efficient enumeration algorithms for sparse graphs. The first algorithm enumerates all the dominating sets for $k$-degenerate graphs in $O(k)$ time per solution using $O(n + m)$ space. Since planar graphs have a constant degeneracy, this algorithm can enumerate all such sets for planar graphs in constant time per solution. The other algorithm enumerates

Faster integer multiplication using short lattice vectors. (arXiv:1802.07932v1 [cs.SC])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We prove that $n$-bit integers may be multiplied in $O(n \log n \, 4^{\log^* n})$ bit operations. This complexity bound had been achieved previously by several authors, assuming various unproved number-theoretic hypotheses. Our proof is unconditional, and depends in an essential way on Minkowski's theorem concerning lattice vectors in symmetric convex sets.

Near Isometric Terminal Embeddings for Doubling Metrics. (arXiv:1802.07967v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Given a metric space $(X,d)$, a set of terminals $K\subseteq X$, and a parameter $t\ge 1$, we consider metric structures (e.g., spanners, distance oracles, embedding into normed spaces) that preserve distances for all pairs in $K\times X$ up to a factor of $t$, and have small size (e.g. number of edges for spanners, dimension for embeddings). While such terminal (aka source-wise) metric structures are known to exist in several settings, no terminal spanner or embedding with distortion close to 1, i.e., $

Hard and Easy Instances of L-Tromino Tilings. (arXiv:1710.04640v2 [cs.CC] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this work we study tilings of regions in the square lattice with L-shaped trominoes. Deciding the existence of a tiling with L-trominoes for an arbitrary region in general is NP-complete, nonetheless, we identify restrictions to the problem where it either remains NP-complete or has a polynomial time algorithm. First, we characterize the possibility of when an Aztec rectangle has an L-tromino tiling, and hence also an Aztec diamond; if an Aztec rectangle has an unknown number of defects or holes, howe

Pattern-Based Approach to the Workflow Satisfiability Problem with User-Independent Constraints. (arXiv:1604.05636v2 [cs.AI] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

The fixed parameter tractable (FPT) approach is a powerful tool in tackling computationally hard problems. In this paper, we link FPT results to classic artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to show how they complement each other. Specifically, we consider the workflow satisfiability problem (WSP) which asks whether there exists an assignment of authorised users to the steps in a workflow specification, subject to certain constraints on the assignment. It was shown by Cohen et al. (JAIR 2014) that WSP

Dynamic smooth compressed quadtrees (Fullversion). (arXiv:1712.05591v2 [cs.CG] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

We introduce dynamic smooth (a.k.a. balanced) compressed quadtrees with worst-case constant time updates in constant dimensions. We distinguish two versions of the problem. First, we show that quadtrees as a space-division data structure can be made smooth and dynamic subject to split and merge operations on the quadtree cells. Second, we show that quadtrees used to store a set of points in $\mathbb{R}^d$ can be made smooth and dynamic subject to insertions and deletions of points. The second version use

Lossy Kernels for Connected Dominating Set on Sparse Graphs. (arXiv:1706.09339v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

For $\alpha > 1$, an $\alpha$-approximate (bi-)kernel is a polynomial-time algorithm that takes as input an instance $(I, k)$ of a problem $\mathcal{Q}$ and outputs an instance $(I',k')$ (of a problem $\mathcal{Q}'$) of size bounded by a function of $k$ such that, for every $c\geq 1$, a $c$-approximate solution for the new instance can be turned into a $(c\cdot\alpha)$-approximate solution of the original instance in polynomial time. This framework of lossy kernelization was recently introduced by Lok

Periodicity in Data Streams with Wildcards. (arXiv:1802.07375v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We investigate the problem of detecting periodic trends within a string $S$ of length $n$, arriving in the streaming model, containing at most $k$ wildcard characters, where $k=o(n)$. A wildcard character is a special character that can be assigned any other character. We say $S$ has wildcard-period $p$ if there exists an assignment to each of the wildcard characters so that in the resulting stream the length $n-p$ prefix equals the length $n-p$ suffix. We present a two-pass streaming algorithm that comp

Quantum linear systems algorithms: a primer. (arXiv:1802.08227v1 [quant-ph])

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

The Harrow-Hassidim-Lloyd (HHL) quantum algorithm for sampling from the solution of a linear system provides an exponential speed-up over its classical counterpart. The problem of solving a system of linear equations has a wide scope of applications, and thus HHL constitutes an important algorithmic primitive. In these notes, we present the HHL algorithm and its improved versions in detail, including explanations of the constituent sub- routines. More specifically, we discuss various quantum subroutines

Distributable Consistent Multi-Graph Matching. (arXiv:1611.07191v2 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this paper we propose an optimization-based framework to multiple graph matching. The framework takes as input maps computed between pairs of graphs, and outputs maps that 1) are consistent among all pairs of graphs, and 2) preserve edge connectivity between pairs of graphs. The central idea of our approach is to divide the input graph into overlapping sub-graphs and enforce consistency among sub-graphs. This leads to a distributed formulation, which is scalable to large-scale datasets. We also presen

Scaling-up Split-Merge MCMC with Locality Sensitive Sampling (LSS). (arXiv:1802.07444v1 [cs.LG] CROSS LISTED)

Friday, February 23, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Split-Merge MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) is one of the essential and popular variants of MCMC for problems when an MCMC state consists of an unknown number of components or clusters. It is well known that state-of-the-art methods for split-merge MCMC do not scale well. Strategies for rapid mixing requires smart and informative proposals to reduce the rejection rate. However, all known smart proposals involve cost at least linear in the size of the data $ \ge O(N)$, to suggest informative transitions.

Metasuperficie hiperbólica de nitruro de boro hexagonal para nanofotónica con polaritones

Friday, February 23, 01:17 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Las metasuperficies ópticas son metamateriales muy delgados con una nanoestructura por debajo de la longitud de onda de la luz. En las metasuperficies metálicas se propagan plasmones superficiales de tipo polaritón (SPPs). Se publica en Science una metasuperficie hiperbólica, […]

Midcentury Monuments

Friday, February 23, 00:53 UTC @ bit-player

Three serious books lie open before me. I had a variety of reasons for checking them out of the library, although they’re all related in one way or another to current goings on here at the Simons Institute: Donald O. … Continue reading →

Things’s New Custom URL Scheme for Automation

Friday, February 23, 00:35 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Cultured Code: Things now supports a special kind of link (or URL) that starts with “things:”. These links are just like the ones you use every day on the web, except they allow you to send a variety of commands to Things. Here’s an example: <things:///show?id=today>. Tapping this link will open Things and tell it to show your Today list. Try it now if you already have Things 3.4 installed. This is pretty neat, and they’ve gon

Nix 2.0 Released

Friday, February 23, 00:12 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 259# Comments: 100

Show HN: Hacker News Classics

Friday, February 23, 00:11 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 712# Comments: 70

The AR-15 Is Different

Friday, February 23, 00:01 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Radiologist Heather Sher, writing for The Atlantic: In a typical handgun injury that I diagnose almost daily, a bullet leaves a laceration through an organ like the liver. To a radiologist, it appears as a linear, thin, grey bullet track through the organ. There may be bleeding and some bullet fragments. I was looking at a CT scan of one of the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who had been brought to the trauma center during my call shift. The or

Fibonacci / Binomial coefficient identity

Thursday, February 22, 22:34 UTC @ John D. Cook

Here’s an identity relating Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients. You can think of it as a finite sum or an infinite sum: binomial coefficients are zero when the numerator is an integer and the denominator is a larger integer. See the general definition of binomial coefficients. Source: Sam E. Ganis. Notes on the Fibonacci Sequence. The […]

Founder Stories: Alexander Mistakidis of Gamelynx

Thursday, February 22, 22:15 UTC @ Y Combinator

Alexander Mistakidis is cofounder and CEO of Gamelynx (YC S17). Discussed: Esports; Student Entrepreneurship; Mental Health; Working at Riot Games; Alexander’s Favorite Games.

Who's Missing from America's Colleges? Rural High School Graduates

Thursday, February 22, 22:11 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 232# Comments: 265

Self-owning corporations are legally possible

Thursday, February 22, 21:23 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 303# Comments: 165

China's Xinjiang surveillance is the dystopian future nobody wants

Thursday, February 22, 21:00 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 327# Comments: 246

Picking the Latter

Thursday, February 22, 20:19 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alexandra Petri, in an op-ed for The Washington Post: There are certain sorts of people whom we once thought we should give respect and space to. Gold Star mothers. Gold Star fathers. The victims of unthinkable tragedies, in the few days after those tragedies. But that was when they had the grace to be silent and let us determine, for ourselves, the moral of what they had lived through. That was when they did not demand that we take responsibility. Now, if you don’t want to h

YC’s Series A Diligence Checklist

Thursday, February 22, 19:27 UTC @ Y Combinator

When we launched our Series A program a few months ago, we decided that what we learn along the way shouldn’t just be kept inside of YC. We're going to publish tools and learnings from the program that should help every company create better outcomes. This is the first tool. It’s simple, but effective.

Industry-University Cooperative Research Center Increases Focus on AI

Thursday, February 22, 18:43 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The Center for Advanced Knowledge Enablement (CAKE), started about a decade ago at Florida International University (FIU) and Florida Atlantic University (FAU) under the auspices of the National Science Foundation. Since then, CAKE has added 71 Industry members and completed more than 100 applied industry projects. I serve as the Chairperson of the Industry Advisory […] The post Industry-University C

The Life and Death of Twitter for Mac

Thursday, February 22, 18:33 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Rene Ritchie had me and a few special guests on his show to talk about the late great Twitter for Mac. Forget about the fact that I’m on it — I’m really intrigued by what Rene is doing with this show and the video format. ★

Worst Roommate Ever

Thursday, February 22, 17:58 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 337# Comments: 210

Pros and Cons of Nearshoring Vs Offshoring – An Infographic

Thursday, February 22, 17:55 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

You have options when it comes to outsourcing software development projects. The term “nearshoring” means working with a team in a nearby country rather than the other side of the world. Countries in Latin America such as Mexico and Costa Rica are good examples of places that are typically used for nearshore outsourcing. In contrast, […] The post Pros and Cons of Nearshoring Vs Offshor

My Python Development Environment, 2018 Edition

Thursday, February 22, 17:23 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 480# Comments: 209

How Cells Pack Tangled DNA Into Neat Chromosomes

Thursday, February 22, 17:20 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

For the first time, researchers see how proteins grab loops of DNA and bundle them for cell division. The discovery also hints at how the genome folds to regulate gene expression.

Meltdown fix committed to OpenBSD

Thursday, February 22, 17:11 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 235# Comments: 55

Display More Screenshots on Your Product Page

Thursday, February 22, 17:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

You can now display up to 10 screenshots on your product page on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Apple TV, to show customers more of your app’s experience.Learn how to make the most of your product page.

Managing your Compute Engine instances just got easier

Thursday, February 22, 17:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Sophia Yang, Product Manager If you use Compute Engine, you probably spend a lot of time creating, cloning and managing VM instances. We recently added new management features that will make performing those tasks much easier. More ways to create instances and use instance templates With the recent updates to Compute Engine

Robinhood Opens Cryptocurrency Trading

Thursday, February 22, 16:48 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 221# Comments: 198

A Global Optimization Algorithm Worth Using

Thursday, February 22, 16:17 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 252# Comments: 59

Contract Tests Ensure Faithful Doubles

Thursday, February 22, 15:50 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Our approach to integration testing avoids hitting real services in order to make testing easier and faster. But then a question rears up - how do we know the test doubles for our integration tests are true doubles of the collaborating service? Ham answers this question by

Hacker News's Undocumented Features and Behaviors

Thursday, February 22, 15:04 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 736# Comments: 380

Creating a single pane of glass for your multi-cloud Kubernetes workloads with Cloudflare

Thursday, February 22, 14:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Kamilla Amirova, Solutions Engineer, Special Projects, Cloudflare [Editor’s note: As much as we’d love to host all your workloads on Google Cloud Platform (GCP), sometimes it’s not in the cards. Today we hear from Cloudflare about how to enable a multi-cloud configuration using its load balancer to front Kubernetes-based workloads in both Google Kubernetes Engine and Amazon Web Services (AWS

Taiwan ban single-use plastic straws, plastic bags, disposable utensils by 2030

Thursday, February 22, 13:43 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 629# Comments: 387

NP is Hard

Thursday, February 22, 12:43 UTC @ Computational Complexity

You don't get much press by stating conventional beliefs--there is no "round earth society". Nevertheless there are serious researchers out there trying to say that it is reasonably possible if not likely that P = NP. Don't believe it. Emanuele Viola just outright states I Believe P = NP. He starts with a similar argument that we've seen from

Shut up and simulate. (In which I try to understand how dark matter forms galaxies, and end up very confused.)

Thursday, February 22, 12:41 UTC @ Backreaction

Galactic structures.Illustris Simulation.[Image Source] Most of the mass in the universe isn’t a type of matter we are familiar with. Instead, it’s a mysterious kind of “dark matter” that doesn’t emit or absorb light. It also interacts rarely both with itself and with normal matter, too rarely to have left any trace in our detectors. We know dark matter is out there because we see its

Shut up and simulate. (In which I try to understand how dark matter forms galaxies, and end up very confused.)

Thursday, February 22, 12:41 UTC @ Backreaction

Galactic structures.Illustris Simulation.[Image Source] Most of the mass in the universe isn’t a type of matter we are familiar with. Instead, it’s a mysterious kind of “dark matter” that doesn’t emit or absorb light. It also interacts rarely both with itself and with normal matter, too rarely to have left any trace in our detectors. We know dark matter is out there because we see its

Entrevista en Pensando Críticamente

Thursday, February 22, 12:25 UTC @ brucknerite

He tenido el placer de ser entrevistado en Pensando Críticamente, el podcast de la ARP: Sociedad para el Avance del Pensamiento Crítico. Juan Rodríguez, Emilio Molina (@ej_molina_c) e Inma León (@InmaLeonC) me plantearon preguntas interesantes y complejas sobre la percepción del riesgo y la gestión de las información generada por los grandes accidentes en medios de transporte, … Continúa leyendo

Preparing for Malicious Uses of AI

Thursday, February 22, 11:39 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 317# Comments: 225

Snips Uses Rust to Build an Embedded Voice Assistant

Thursday, February 22, 08:41 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 205# Comments: 55

Computer History Museum 2018 Fellow: Guido van Rossum

Thursday, February 22, 07:47 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 296# Comments: 63

Electron 2.0.0 beta

Thursday, February 22, 06:44 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 252# Comments: 420

I don’t understand Graph Theory

Thursday, February 22, 05:18 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 526# Comments: 135

Bloomberg: ‘Apple in Talks to Buy Cobalt Directly From Miners’

Wednesday, February 21, 21:10 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jack Farchy and Mark Gurman, reporting for Bloomberg: Apple Inc. is in talks to buy long-term supplies of cobalt directly from miners for the first time, according to people familiar with the matter, seeking to ensure it will have enough of the key battery ingredient amid industry fears of a shortage driven by the electric vehicle boom. The iPhone maker is one of the world’s largest end users of cobalt for the batteries in its gadgets, but until now it has left the business o

Remembering pastor Billy Graham, and more news in brief

Wednesday, February 21, 20:10 UTC @ TED Blog

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Remembering Billy Graham. For more than 60 years, pastor Billy Graham inspired countless people around the world with his sermons. On Wednesday, February 21, he passed away at his home in North Carolina after struggling with numerous illnesses over the past few years. He was 99 years old. Raised […]

Inside the Federal Bureau of Way Too Many Guns

Wednesday, February 21, 19:59 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jeanne Marie Laskas, writing for GQ in 2016: “It’s a shoestring budget,” says Charlie, who runs the center. “It’s not 10,000 agents and a big sophisticated place. It’s a bunch of friggin’ boxes. All half-ass records. We have about 50 ATF employees. And all the rest are basically the ladies. The ladies that live in West Virginia — and they got a job. There’s a huge amount of labor being put into looking through microfilm.” I want to as

Why the Second Amendment Does Not Stymie Gun Control

Wednesday, February 21, 19:03 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The Economist: It is impossible to say whether erasing the Second Amendment would bring down gun deaths in America. But this is an academic query: changes to the constitution require the unlikely assent of two-thirds majorities in the House and Senate and three-quarters of the states. The better question is whether repealing the amendment is a must for pursuing gun control. It is not. The Heller majority opinion did not, in the words of its author, the late Justice Antonin Scalia, sec

‘I’ve only had good years.’

Wednesday, February 21, 18:42 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Robert Safian, interviewing Tim Cook for Fast Company after the magazine named Apple the world’s most innovative company: Fast Company: What makes a good year for Apple? Is it the new hit products? The stock price? Tim Cook: Stock price is a result, not an achievement by itself. For me, it’s about products and people. Did we make the best product, and did we enrich people’s lives? If you’re doing both of those things — and obviously those things are incredibly

Apple Maps vs. Google Maps vs. Waze (in the Bay Area)

Wednesday, February 21, 17:43 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Artur Grabowski (no relation, presumably, to Steve): In early 2017, a conversation with yet another Waze fanboy finally nudged me to start a navigation app experiment. I was skeptical that the Alphabet owned company could meaningfully best its parent’s home grown Google Maps. I was also curious whether Apple Maps had discovered competence since its iOS 6 release. I thus set out to answer three questions: W

The thing is . . . Cloud IoT Core is now generally available

Wednesday, February 21, 16:56 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Indranil Chakraborty, Product Manager, Google Cloud Today, we’re excited to announce that Cloud IoT Core, our fully managed service to help securely connect and manage IoT devices at scale, is now generally available. With Cloud IoT Core, you can easily connect and centrally manage millions of globally dispersed connected devices. When used as part of the broader

La saturación turbulenta en plasmas explica los pulsos fríos en tokamaks

Wednesday, February 21, 15:33 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Su llama pulso frío al incremento rápido de la temperatura en el centro de un plasma confinado debido a un enfriamiento en su borde externo. Este fenómeno se ha observado en tokamaks y stellarators desde 1994 para plasmas de […] Leer más

Why Self-Taught Artificial Intelligence Has Trouble With the Real World

Wednesday, February 21, 14:35 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

The latest artificial intelligence systems start from zero knowledge of a game and grow to world-beating in a matter of hours. But researchers are struggling to apply these systems beyond the arcade.

Painless project management

Wednesday, February 21, 03:46 UTC @ John D. Cook

This evening, after I got off a phone call discussing a project with a colleague, I thought “Huh, I guess you could call that project management.” I worked as a project manager earlier in my career, but what I’m doing now feels completely different and much more pleasant. Strip away the bureaucracy and politics, and […]

Switzerland Considers the Lobster

Wednesday, February 21, 03:12 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jason Kottke: Come March 1, it will be illegal to throw a lobster into a pot of boiling water. Chefs and home cooks alike will need to quickly kill the lobster first and then cook it. […] But really, this is just an excuse to revisit a sublime piece of journalism that David Foster Wallace wrote i

The Hill: ‘Newt Gingrich Says Arming Teachers Only Long-Term Solution to School Shootings’

Wednesday, February 21, 03:11 UTC @ Daring Fireball

This is fucking insane: Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) on Tuesday argued that the only long-term solution to school shootings is to train teachers and administrators in the use of guns. Gingrich offered the remarks in an interview on “Fox & Friends.” “I think the only long-term solution, depending on the size of the school, is a minimum of six to eight teachers and administrators who are trained in the use of firearms and have conceal carry permits and ar

Magic!

Wednesday, February 21, 01:18 UTC @ Miguel de Icaza

Mono has a pure C# implementation of the Windows.Forms stack which works on Mac, Linux and Windows. It emulates some of the core of the Win32 API to achieve this. While Mono's Windows.Forms is not an actively developed UI stack, it is required by a number of third party libraries, some data types are consumed by other Mono libraries (part of the original design contract), so we have kept it around.

★ iOS Messages and Smart Punctuation

Tuesday, February 20, 23:09 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Apple, please, give us back our smart punctuation for iMessages.

Why I am excited about Unity in 2018

Tuesday, February 20, 23:08 UTC @ Miguel de Icaza

While I had promised my friend Lucas that I would build a game in Unity for what seems like a decade, I still have not managed to build one. Recently Aras shared his excitement for Unity in 2018. There is a ton on that blog post to unpack.

Microsoft’s Azure Services in China Are Contracted to a Chinese Company, Too

Tuesday, February 20, 19:37 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Microsoft: Microsoft Azure operated by 21Vianet (Azure China 21Vianet) is a physically separated instance of cloud services located in mainland China, independently operated and transacted by Shanghai Blue Cloud Technology Co., Ltd. (“21Vianet”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Beijing 21Vianet Broadband Data Center Co., Ltd. The services are based on the same Azure, Microsoft Office 365, and Microsoft Power BI technologies that make up the Microsoft global cloud servi

[Sponsor] Jamf Now

Tuesday, February 20, 19:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

For many people, IT is a task and not a career. Now you can support your users without help from IT. Jamf Now is a simple, cloud-based solution designed to help anyone set up, manage, and protect Apple devices at work. Easily configure company email and Wi-Fi networks, distribute apps to your team, and protect sensitive data without locking down devices. Daring F

Nikkei Asian Review’s Irresistible Verb

Tuesday, February 20, 19:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Philip Elmer‑DeWitt: But I know a dog whistle when I hear it, and in the Nikkei stories below the verb “to slash” — to cut with a violent sweeping motion — is code for Apple is doomed. Jan. 29: Apple will slash its production target for the iPhone X Feb. 16: OLED panel glut looms as Apple slashes iPhone X production Feb. 20: Samsung to slash OLED panel output as iPhone X slumps Here’s the thing

On Writing Software Well

Tuesday, February 20, 18:11 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

QISKit for quantum computation

Tuesday, February 20, 17:47 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Current quantum computation efforts are the result of a long history of scientific achievements. The initial formulation of quantum mechanics in the 1920s and 30s gave us a fundamentally new understanding of the natural world. By the 70s, it was understood that this paradigm shift can also have implications for the way we compute. This […] The post QISKit for quantum computation appeared first on

Physicists Mourn Joe Polchinski, Developer of Deep Ideas and Paradoxes

Tuesday, February 20, 17:17 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

The theoretical physicist Joe Polchinski, who died Feb. 2, left a tremendous professional and personal legacy, says a friend and collaborator.

Meetings are Toxic

Tuesday, February 20, 16:01 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Integration Tests in the Pyramid

Tuesday, February 20, 14:12 UTC @ Martin Fowler

People find the notion of integration tests confusing, since they are ill-defined even by the standards of testing terminology. So they are a great topic for Ham's example application and expl

Charity Models Supply Chain Performance with IBM

Tuesday, February 20, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

I’ve always sought out challenging applied research problems and am particularly attracted to applications of technology in the social sector. That’s why I was thrilled to work on a supply chain-focused project with the non-profit organization St. John’s Bread & Life (SJBL) within IBM’s Science for Social Good program in 2017. Based in Brooklyn, SJBL […] The post Charity Models Suppl

This Week in Rust 222

Tuesday, February 20, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Swift Tip: Enums vs Classes

Tuesday, February 20, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In Swift Talk 88, Brandon Kase showed us the tradeoffs of designing libraries with enums or classes. When an external library defines its data types as classes, it is easy for us to add a new case: we create a subclass, and override all the necessary methods. An example of this is in UIKit: we can add a new UIView subclass and adjust everything t

A better NSManagedObjectContext​.performAndWait

Monday, February 19, 22:04 UTC @ Ole Begemann

The DispatchQueue.sync method has this nice property that it automatically returns whatever value you return from the dispatched block. This allows you to write something like the following: let v = queue.sync<

Apple’s Upcoming Handover of Chinese iCloud Data to a State-Owned Company

Monday, February 19, 21:22 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Lo Shih-hung, writing for The Hong Kong Free Press: The US-based global tech giant Apple Inc. is set to hand over the operation of its iCloud data center in mainland China to a local corporation called Guizhou-Cloud Big Data (GCBD) by February 28, 2018. When this transition happens, the local company will become responsible for handling the legal and financial relationship between Apple and China’s iCloud users. After the transition takes place, the role of Apple will restricted to

Quién acuñó el término «materia oscura»

Monday, February 19, 20:51 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Mucha gente supone que el término «materia oscura» fue usado por primera vez en los 1970 por Vera Rubin o en los 1930 por Fritz Zwicky. Sin embargo, el término «matière obscure» (en francés) fue acuñado por Henri Poincaré […] Leer más

Nuevo límite de exclusión de SuperCDMS a las WIMP como materia oscura

Monday, February 19, 19:14 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Los límites de exclusión son el único resultado, por ahora, de los experimentos de búsqueda directa de la materia oscura. Para partículas WIMP con masa entre 10 y 250 GeV/c² los límites más estrictos se obtienen con los detectores […] Leer más

Welcome Eric, Holly, Diego, Matt, Nic, Kyle, Adele, Jose, Matt, Ramon, and Gia

Monday, February 19, 17:02 UTC @ Y Combinator

A lot of great people joined the YC and YCC teams in the past six months. You can now see a full list of people at YC here.…

New animation feature for exponential sums

Monday, February 19, 16:57 UTC @ John D. Cook

There’s now an “Animate” link on the exponential sum pages that lets you watch the curves being drawn. Sometimes these are surprising. The plot of the partial sums might bounce all over in the process of filling in a very symmetric plot. Here’s an example of that.  

Quantifying normal approximation accuracy

Monday, February 19, 15:29 UTC @ John D. Cook

Probability is full of theorems that say that probability density approximates another as some parameter becomes large. All the dashed lines in the diagram below indicate a relationship like this.   You can find details of what everything in the diagram means here. How can you quantify these approximations? One way is to use Kullback-Leibler […]

Scientific Reports ya es la mayor megarrevista científica superando a PLoS ONE

Monday, February 19, 14:30 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Se llaman megarrevistas (megajournals) a las que publican más de 5200 artículos al año (más de 100 a la semana). Scientific Reports (Springer Nature) publicó 25 725 artículos en 2017, mientras PLoS ONE (Public Library of Science) solo publicó […]

More Interface Builder Tips And Tricks

Monday, February 19, 09:48 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

My top ten tips, tricks, dos and don’ts to make you feel like an Interface Builder expert. I wrote about the first two of these nearly five years ago. See Xcode Interface Builder Tips if you are nostalgic for pre-iOS 7 design. Here is a more up-to-date list of my favourites, see how many you know: To easily select an object when it is behind a stack of other items hold down the Ctrl (⌃) + Sh

El silencio no existe

Monday, February 19, 09:00 UTC @ brucknerite

El silencio no existe. De ningún modo esta realidad se ve más clara que con la escala logarítmica que usamos para arrojar luz sobre el misterio de la percepción: cero decibelios no es más que un nivel de referencia, un punto en una escala de energías entre la saturación y el ruido de fondo. El … Continúa leyendo El silencio no existe

The web bad/People using it bad.

Monday, February 19, 04:08 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I was going to write a post about how hard it was to find what grades mean at different schools (e.g., at UMCP W (for withdraw) means the student dropped the course, but at UT Austin its Q (for Quit?)) but then I found that my Googling Name of school grade key I could find it. Okay, so grade keys are not that hard to find. WEB BAD: However, course descriptions are. Both questions (what grades mean and course desc) came up when I do admissions for my REU p

Complex Adaptive System Design (Part 7)

Monday, February 19, 01:09 UTC @ Azimuth

In March, I’ll be talking at Spencer Breiner‘s workshop on Applied Category Theory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. I’ll be giving a joint talk with John Foley about our work using operads to design networks. This work is part of the Complex Adaptive System Composition and Design Environment project being done by […]

The Talk Show: ‘The “Press Real Hard” Era’

Sunday, February 18, 23:22 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Special guest Marco Arment returns to the show for a brief discussion. Topics include Apple’s OS development strategy, HomePod and Siri, the sad state of Apple TV apps, where to get a good cheesesteak, and more. Brought to you by these fine sponsors: Tres Pontas: Freshly-roasted coffee from a single farm in Brazil, shipped directly to you. Use code thetalkshow at checkout and save an extra 10 percent on any subscriptio

Análogos electromagnéticos a la valletrónica en cristales fotónicos planos

Sunday, February 18, 21:28 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Un cristal fotónico bidimensional presenta una estructura de bandas para las ondas electromagnéticas análoga a la de un material conductor bidimensional para los electrones (como el grafeno). Se llaman valles (valleys) a ciertas bandas cuyo origen es la propagación […] Leer más

Documentation Driven Design

Sunday, February 18, 20:07 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

After spending full day adding new documentation to libdill and after getting desperate about the repetitivness of the man pages I've got rid of what I had and spent another day writing a program to generate the documentation. Consider the use cases… A lot of functions, for example, have deadlines. For each of those functions the man page should contain the following text: deadline: A point in time when the operation should time out, in mi

Reseña: “Manual de linternas” editado por Marta Magariños

Sunday, February 18, 08:53 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

“El objetivo de este Manual de linternas es promover la divulgación científica a través de los libros. [Las] reseñas [son] especialmente útiles para eliminar la división entre ciencias y letras. [Este] manual no pretende ser en ningún momento una […] Leer más

How to Treat a Customer

Saturday, February 17, 15:23 UTC @ joe cieplinski

I really can’t say enough about how awesome Baratza is as a company. I’ve had my Virtuoso grinder for more than five years. Up until recently, I’ve only ever had to replace the occasional $5 part once or twice. (They have detailed videos and instructions on how

Ordinary Potential Polynomials

Saturday, February 17, 14:33 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ve run into potential polynomials a lot lately. Most sources I’ve seen are either unclear on how they are defined or use a notation that doesn’t sit well in my brain. Also, they’ll either give an implicit or explicit definition but not both. Both formulations are important. The implicit formulation suggests how potential polynomials arise […]

Applied Category Theory at NIST

Saturday, February 17, 05:35 UTC @ Azimuth

I think it’s really cool how applied category theory is catching on. My former student Blake Pollard is working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology on applications of category theory to electrical engineering. He’s working with Spencer Breiner… and now Breiner is running a workshop on this stuff: • Applied Category Theory: Bridging […]

A Coup(e) of Duchamp

Saturday, February 17, 03:55 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

From “readymade” works to surreal hash table wildness in chess programs fooled by him Toutfait.com source Marcel Duchamp was a leading French chess player whose career was sandwiched between two forays into the art world. He played for the French national team in five chess Olympiads from 1924 to 1933. He finished tied for fourth […]

Twitter Abolishes Native Mac Client

Friday, February 16, 23:17 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Twitter: We’re focusing our efforts on a great Twitter experience that’s consistent across platforms. So, starting today the Twitter for Mac app will no longer be available for download, and in 30 days will no longer be supported. For the full Twitter experience on Mac, visit Twitter on web. It’s hard to overstate just how great a native Mac experience Twitter owned whe

DFW: ‘Roger Federer as Religious Experience’

Friday, February 16, 22:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Worth a re-link. David Foster Wallace in 2006 on then-25-year-old Roger Federer: The Moments are more intense if you’ve played enough tennis to understand the impossibility of what you just saw him do. We’ve all got our examples. Here is one. It’s the finals of the 2005 U.S. Open, Federer serving to Andre Agassi early in the fourth set. There’s a medium-long exchange of groundstrokes, one with the distinctive butterfly shape of today’s power-baseline game, Federer and Agassi

Lauren Goode vs. Lauren Goode: iPhone X vs. Pixel 2

Friday, February 16, 21:56 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Such a gimmicky gimmick, yes, but Lauren Goode does this so fucking well. I just love it. Technically it’s pretty darn good, but substantially it’s downright amazing: she makes wonderfully accurate cases for both phones. ★

How the NRA Rewrote the Second Amendment

Friday, February 16, 21:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Michael Waldman, writing for Politico in 2014: From 1888, when law review articles first were indexed, through 1959, every single one on the Second Amendment concluded it did not guarantee an individual right to a gun. The first to argue otherwise, written by a William and Mary law student named Stuart R. Hays, appeared in 1960. He began by citing an article in the NRA’s American Rifleman magazine and argued that the amendment enforced a “right of revolution,” of which the South

‘Paul Ryan: No “Knee Jerk” Reactions on Guns. Ever.’

Friday, February 16, 21:15 UTC @ Daring Fireball

These mass shootings in the U.S. are like a perverse version of Groundhog Day. Republicans say the exact same things in response, every time, as though it’s the first time. Democrats need to stop playing nice and start pounding home over and over that the Republicans are a party that is committed to accepting regular school shootings in the name of gun rights.

7 Companies From the YC Winter 2018 Batch

Friday, February 16, 19:25 UTC @ Y Combinator

Meet the 7 YC Winter 2018 companies that announced they're part of YC this week.

Instructors for Startup Investor School

Friday, February 16, 18:23 UTC @ Y Combinator

Here is the extraordinary group of investors and Y Combinator partners who will come together with Geoff Ralston to teach Startup Investor School.

Exocinturones de Clarke, el tecnomarcador más prometedor

Friday, February 16, 17:45 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Los futuros telescopios gigantes (JWST, GMT, E-ELT y TMT) analizarán las atmósferas de algunos exoplanetas. Buscarán vida mediante biomarcadores y civilizaciones tecnológicas con tecnomarcadores. Los exocinturones de Clarke son el nuevo tecnomarcador propuesto por el astrofísico solar Héctor Socas-Navarro. […]

Member of the Band – Sr. Scrum Master Andres Palavicini

Friday, February 16, 17:17 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Sr. Scrum Master Andres Palavicini

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 16 February 2018

Friday, February 16, 17:13 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Happy Friday --let's review what the collective Apache community has been up to: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - The Apache Software Foundation 2018 Vision Statement https://... - Next Board Meeting: 21 February. Board calendar and minutes http://...

Bell polynomials: partial, ordinary, and exponential

Friday, February 16, 16:07 UTC @ John D. Cook

Bell polynomials come up naturally in a variety of contexts: combinatorics, analysis, statistics, etc. Unfortunately, the variations on Bell polynomials are confusingly named. Analogy with differential equations There are Bell polynomials of one variable and Bell polynomials of several variables. The latter are sometimes called “partial” Bell polynomials. In differential equations, “ordinary” means univariate (ODEs) […]

[Sponsor] Meh.com: Selling Shit You Don’t Want for So Cheap That You Buy It Anyway

Friday, February 16, 15:21 UTC @ Daring Fireball

People ask what kinds of things we sell, and it’s hard to categorize — headphones, knives, pearl necklaces, pliers (just from the last few weeks) — but you know what it’s got in common? It’s dirt cheap. Cheaper than anywhere else, cheaper than it’s ever been, possibly cheaper than it’ll ever be. We hate hype and we hate marketing pitches, but that’s just literally the easiest way to explain what we sell.

Impostor Syndrome | Hangout with Jason Cohen | 22nd February

Friday, February 16, 15:18 UTC @ Business of Software USA

You’re an impostor. You had a good idea one day. Your good idea turned into a great product. Slowly but surely, you gained customers who paid for your product. Then you started employing people. People who looked up to you, trusted you, followed you. You’re successful – both the business and you personally. And yet, […] The post Impostor Syndrome | Hangout with Jason Cohen | 22nd Febru

Un-Jobsifying software development

Friday, February 16, 14:11 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Every Member of Congress Who Took Money From the NRA and Tweeted ‘Thoughts and Prayers’ to Parkland

Friday, February 16, 01:25 UTC @ Daring Fireball

103 Republicans, 1 Democrat. It’s not “Congress” as a whole that refuses to take action. (Also, it’s not a complete list. My own Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) has taken boatloads of money from pro-gun groups and tweeted this in response to yesterday’s massacre, which I think clearly counts as a “thoughts and prayersR

McCLIM: McCLIM 0.9.7 "Imbolc" release

Friday, February 16, 00:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

After 10 years we have decided that it is time to make a new release - the first one since 2008, which was McCLIM 0.9.6, St. George's Day. Imbolc is a Gaelic traditional festival marking the beginning of spring held between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. Due to a long period of time, the number of changes is too big to list in full detail and we will thus note only major changes made during the last eleven iterations (though many important changes were done before t

Build Your Apps for iOS 11 and iPhone X

Thursday, February 15, 20:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

iOS 11 has brought innovative features and the redesigned App Store to hundreds of millions of customers around the world. Your apps can deliver more intelligent, unified, and immersive experiences with Core ML, ARKit, new camera APIs, new SiriKit domains, Apple Music integration, drag and drop for iPad, and more.Starting April 2018, all new iOS apps submitted to the App Store must be built with the iOS 11 SDK, included in Xcode 9 or later. All new apps for iPhone, including universal apps, must support the

Et Tu, Sonos?

Thursday, February 15, 19:59 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Mike Prospero, writing for Tom’s Guide: When I got home, I saw a large white ring, a telltale indication that the HomePod’s silicone base had messed up the finish. But, as I was inspecting the damage, I noticed a series of smaller white marks near where the HomePod was sitting. A closer inspection revealed that the Sonos One speaker, which also has small silicone feet, had made these marks on my cabinet. Looking around the top of the cabinet, I noticed a bunch of li

Strategy Analytics Claims Apple Took Over Half of Worldwide Phone Revenue Last Quarter

Thursday, February 15, 19:47 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Evan Niu, The Motley Fool: Strategy Analytics executive director Neil Mawston points out that “Apple now accounts for more revenue than the rest of the entire global smartphone industry combined.” iPhone ASP is flirting with $800, while the broader industry’s ASP is approximately $300. This latter metric was up 18% year over year, as both Apple and Samsung saw success with their respective premium flagships. Samsung’s Note 8 and Galaxy S8 remain popular, but Sa

We’ve Reached the Point Where People Are Giving Up on Schools

Thursday, February 15, 19:42 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Actual headline in an op-ed from the Miami Herald today: “In the Wake of the Douglas High Massacre, Is Home Schooling a Better Option?” That’s how ridiculous our situation has become. People are starting to question whether the problem is with sending kids to school, not with pervasive access to military weapons.

‘No Way to Prevent This’, Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens

Thursday, February 15, 19:23 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The Onion posts the same headline after every mass shooting in the U.S., and every time they do it, it’s more apt than ever. That’s the shot. Here’s the chaser: “Gorilla Sales Skyrocket After Latest Gorilla Attack”.

‘The Gun Is Our Moloch’

Thursday, February 15, 18:09 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Garry Wills, writing for The New York Review five years ago, after the Sandy Hook grade school massacre: The gun is not a mere tool, a bit of technology, a political issue, a point of debate. It is an object of reverence. Devotion to it precludes interruption with the sacrifices it entails. Like most gods, it does what it will, and cannot be questioned. Its acolytes think it is capable only of good things. It guarantees life and safety and freedom. It even guarantees law. Law grows fr

What does it mean for string theory that the LHC has not seen supersymmetric particles?

Thursday, February 15, 17:18 UTC @ Backreaction

And what will become of supersymmetric string theory if Susy is bumped off ? — Suhail Manzoor (@suhailski) February 13, 2018 What are the consequences of no SUSY? — John Deer (@johnxdeer) February 13, 2018 The LHC data so far have not revealed any evidence for supersymmetric particles, or any other new particles. For all we know at present, the standard model of particle

What does it mean for string theory that the LHC has not seen supersymmetric particles?

Thursday, February 15, 17:18 UTC @ Backreaction

And what will become of supersymmetric string theory if Susy is bumped off ? — Suhail Manzoor (@suhailski) February 13, 2018 What are the consequences of no SUSY? — John Deer (@johnxdeer) February 13, 2018 The LHC data so far have not revealed any evidence for supersymmetric particles, or any other new particles. For all we know at present, the standard model of particle

Unit Tests in the Pyramid

Thursday, February 15, 15:32 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Ham now starts looking at the pyramid in earnest, beginning with the foundation of the pyramid - unit tests. more…

Ways to connect

Thursday, February 15, 14:29 UTC @ John D. Cook

If you visit this blog once in a while, here are a few ways to hear from me more regularly. Subscription You can subscribe to the blog via RSS or email. I often use SVG images because they look great on a variety of devices, but most email clients won’t display that format. If you […]

Scant Evidence of Power Laws Found in Real-World Networks

Thursday, February 15, 14:29 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

A new study challenges one of the most celebrated and controversial ideas in network science.

Corporate Education

Thursday, February 15, 13:09 UTC @ Computational Complexity

First of all read the #metoo testimonial going around the TCS blogosphere. Our field is not immune. Last Sunday Frank Bruni wrote an op-ed column Corporations will Inherit the Earth, an article on how corporations have taken on what governments used to do. Quite a bit is focused on education.

Riding the SwiftKey Rocket Ship from Startup to Acquisition | Jon Reynolds, SwiftKey | BoS Europe 2017

Thursday, February 15, 12:15 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Jon Reynolds, Founder, SwiftKey Jon Reynolds founded SwiftKey, the predictive typing app, in 2008 with university friend Ben Medlock. From launch in 2010 to now, SwiftKey has grown to over 300 million daily users. Jon was CEO of the company from its genesis and guided it from humble beginnings, through to selling the business to Microsoft […] The post

Polymath The Securities Token Platform Using Blockchain

Thursday, February 15, 10:06 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

Facebook Now Spamming Users With Texts if They’ve Enabled Two-Factor Security

Thursday, February 15, 01:46 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Kate Conger, writing for Gizmodo: I’ve been getting these text-spam messages since last summer, when I set up a new Facebook account and turned on two-factor authentication. I created the new profile with somewhat vague intentions of using it for professional purposes — I didn’t like the idea of messaging sources from my primary Facebook account, where they could flip through pictures of my high school prom or my young nephews. But I didn’t end up using the profile often,

OmniOutliner 3 for iOS

Thursday, February 15, 00:14 UTC @ inessential.com

I’d done almost no iOS work since system 7 came out — but, once we were finished with OmniOutliner 5 for Mac (a release I’m super-proud of), it was time to go work on OmniOutliner 3 for iOS, and so they pulled me back in. :) I was just one person on a much bigger team, of course. I helped indent some things and helped with filters. But there’s a whole bunch more besides — it’s a

★ Sponsoring Daring Fireball, Early 2018 Edition

Wednesday, February 14, 23:45 UTC @ Daring Fireball

There’s a part of me that hates posting self-promotional stuff here on Daring Fireball. There’s another part of me that wants to sell ads and keep this thing afloat, and knows that I sell more ads when I, you know, mention that there are ads for sale.

Nick Heer: ‘Reports of Google’s Newfound Design Prowess Have Been Greatly Exaggerated’

Wednesday, February 14, 23:18 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Nick Heer on the new YouTube app for Apple TV: None of these elements behaves as you might expect, primarily because the YouTube app doesn’t interpret swipes and scrolls like any other app. There’s no audible blip whenever you select something, and swiping around manages to be both sluggish and jerky. The frustratingly slow scrolling is especially pronounced on the aforementioned horizontal navigation element because swiping just a little too far to the left will o

LLVM accepted to 2018 Google Summer of Code!

Wednesday, February 14, 21:36 UTC @ Planet Clang

We are excited to announce the LLVM project has been accepted to 2018 Google Summer of Code!What is Google Summer of Code?Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program focused on introducing students to open source software development. Students work on a 3 month programming project with an open source organization during their break from university. There are several benefits to this program for both the students and LLVM:Inspire students to get involved with open source, compilers and LLVMGive student

Facebook Is Pushing Its Data-Tracking Onavo VPN Within Its Main Mobile App

Wednesday, February 14, 20:47 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Sarah Perez, writing for TechCrunch: Onavo Protect, the VPN client from the data-security app maker acquired by Facebook back in 2013, has now popped up in the Facebook iOS app itself, under the banner “Protect” in the navigation menu. Clicking through on “Protect” will redirect Facebook users to the “Onavo Protect — VPN Security” app’s listing on the App Store. This is spyware. If you use Onavo, Facebook can and will track you everywhere you g

The Omni Show #8: Orion, Bug Hunter

Wednesday, February 14, 20:22 UTC @ inessential.com

In the latest episode of The Omni Show I talk to Orion Protonentis, recovering actor and stage fighter, friend of Shakespeare, and Software Test Pilot. The Scottish Play is mentioned, but only as “the Scottish play.” So we’re all good there — if you’re in a theater ri

"Toward Scalable Verification for Safety-Critical Deep Networks" at SysML 2018

Wednesday, February 14, 19:40 UTC @ composition.al

This Friday, I’m headed over to SysML to present “Toward Scalable Verification for Safety-Critical Deep Networks”, co-authored with Guy Katz, Justin Gottschlich, Kyle Julian, Clark Barrett, and

Kottke on the State of Blogging

Wednesday, February 14, 18:20 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jason Kottke, in a fascinating interview with Laura Hazard Owen for the Nieman Journalism Lab: Melancholy, I think, is the exact right word. Personally, I think I felt a lot worse about it maybe three, four years ago. I was like, crap, what am I going to do here? I can see where this is going, I can see that more and more people are going to go to Facebook, and to mobile, and to all of these social apps and stuff like that, and there’s going to be less and less of a space in there f

#metoo (Guest Post)

Wednesday, February 14, 18:04 UTC @ Ernie's 3D Pancakes

The following guest post comes from a colleague in the theoretical computer science community who wishes to remain anonymous. Please read it. You may see this story on more than one theory blog; that's not an accident. Every #MeToo story...

David Pogue Conducts Blind Test of HomePod Against Competitors

Wednesday, February 14, 17:49 UTC @ Daring Fireball

David Pogue: Of course, I knew what the results would be. I’d heard them myself in the Apple demo; I’d read the other reviews; and I’d done the dress rehearsal the night before. Every time, the HomePod won the match easily. At the end of my own listening test, then, I handed out signs that said “A,” “B,” “C,” and “D,” and asked the panelists to hold up their winners’ signs on the count of three. I knew what they would say: “B,” “B,” “B,” “B

HomePod Can Damage Wood Furniture

Wednesday, February 14, 17:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jon Chase, in Wirecutter’s review of HomePod: An unhappy discovery after we placed a HomePod on an oiled butcher-block countertop and later on a wooden side table was that it left a defined white ring in the surface. Other reviewers and owners (such as Pocket-lint, and

96 vCPU Compute Engine instances are now generally available

Wednesday, February 14, 17:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Hanan Youssef, Product Manager, Compute Engine Today we're happy to announce the general availability of Compute Engine machine types with 96 vCPUs and up to 624 GB of memory. Now you can take advantage of the performance improvements and increased core count provided by the new Intel Xeon Scalable Processors (Skylake). For applications that can scale vertica

Smart Swarms Seek New Ways to Cooperate

Wednesday, February 14, 16:30 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

New algorithms show how swarms of very simple robots can be made to work together as a group.

The Decentralized Future Series

Wednesday, February 14, 16:00 UTC @ Y Combinator

A good method for discovering startup ideas is to look into technological breakthroughs and think about what they unlock that wasn't possible before. In this introductory post, we’ll look at Bitcoin and consider potential use cases that we can directly deduce from its properties.

The Practical Test Pyramid

Wednesday, February 14, 15:27 UTC @ Martin Fowler

The Test Pyramid has become a well-used part of software development. But many people still struggle with how to use it in practice. My colleague Ham Vocke has used it in teaching several teams about effective testing and has gathered together his experiences int

Get the most out of Google Kubernetes Engine with Priority and Preemption

Wednesday, February 14, 15:25 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Babak Salamat and David Oppenheimer, Software Engineers, Google Kubernetes Engine Wouldn’t it be nice if you could ensure that your most important workloads always get the resources they need to run in a Kubernetes cluster? Now you can. Kubernetes 1.9 introduces an alpha feature called “

x.ai launches on Slack

Wednesday, February 14, 14:56 UTC @ x.ai

Now you can use “Amy + Andrew” in your Slack channels and DMs We’ve spent the past four years building our AI assistants to remove the pain of scheduling meetings completely. Today, we moved even closer to that reality: you can now summon Amy + Andrew on Slack as well as via email. If you’re… The post x.ai launches on Slack appeared first on x.ai.

How to use Amy + Andrew on Slack

Wednesday, February 14, 14:54 UTC @ x.ai

Now that you know you can schedule meetings on Slack, you may be wondering how to use your AI assistant in this new (for them) channel. So, without further delay, here’s a quick guide to scheduling with Amy + Andrew on Slack. Type /amy or /andrew to wake up your AI scheduling assistants, so they’ll… The post How to use Amy + Andrew on Slack appeared first on x.ai.

Some Technical Tidbits

Wednesday, February 14, 14:39 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Tid-bit: delicacy, dainty, snack, nibble, appetizer, hors d’oeuvre, goody, dipper, finger food Adam Engst is the publisher of the site TidBITS. This is a site dedicated to technical insights about all aspects of Apple machines: from nano to servers. Today I want to talk about mathematical tidbits not Apple devices, but look at the above […]

Good vs. Better at Bad

Wednesday, February 14, 14:19 UTC @ joe cieplinski

There’s a particular point I’ve been trying to articulate about HomePod vs Amazon Echo and all the others that I haven’t quite figured out how to express succinctly in a tweet. So I’m going to resort to charts. If we wanted to compare HomePod and Echo

A #metoo testimonial that hits close to home...

Wednesday, February 14, 14:00 UTC @ The Geomblog

This is a guest post by a colleague in the TCS community, a person I know. If you read other TCS blogs you might come across this there. This is by design. Please do read it. Every #MeToo story over the last several months has made me pause. My heart races and my concentration fails. The fact that the stories have largely focused on the workplace adds to my difficulty. Do I speak out too? I have shared a few stories with colleagues about things that have happe

Happy Valentine’s Day Puppy Love

Wednesday, February 14, 10:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

This Valentine’s Day, we’d like to celebrate our canine companions by helping them step up their dating game! We are proud of our pooches who give us all the love and support we need to be successful, especially at the office!  Get to know our marvelous mutts with their Valentine’s Day interviews. We hope you […] The post Happy Valentine’s Day Puppy Love appeared first on

Computational Biologists Find Inspiration for Machine Learning Cell Cycle Sorting Method in an Unlikely Place

Wednesday, February 14, 09:46 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The lifespan of cells in the human body varies greatly, from as short as a few days, such as those in our stomach lining, to the cells in our bones, which live for 25-30 years. And for each healthy cell, no matter how long it lives, there is a tightly coordinated series of events that […] The post Computational Biol

Recommended Viewing : Microsoft IoT, Azure IoT, Time Series Insights, Remote Monitoring

Wednesday, February 14, 08:23 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

All of our devices are sending mammoth amounts of telemetry (= data) and a lot of that data is useful. With the emergence the “Internet of Things” (as both a concept and a reality) over the past few years Microsoft … Continue reading →

FreeBSD Project to participate in Google Summer of Code 2018

Wednesday, February 14, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

The FreeBSD Project is pleased to announce its participation in Google's 2018 Summer of Code program, which funds summer students to participate in open source projects. This will be the FreeBSD Project's fourteenth year in the program, having mentored over 210 successful students through summer-long coding projects between 2005 and 2017.

You are here for a reason: 4 questions with Halla Tómasdóttir

Tuesday, February 13, 16:07 UTC @ TED Blog

Cartier and TED believe in the power of bold ideas to empower local initiatives to have global impact. To celebrate Cartier’s dedication to launching the ideas of female entrepreneurs into concrete change, TED has curated a special session of talks around the theme “Bold Alchemy” for the Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards, featuring a selection of favorite

Playground Graphs

Tuesday, February 13, 14:12 UTC @ Indie Stack

I was playing around with the Swift standard library’s “map” function, when I noticed a cool feature of Xcode Playgrounds. Suppose you are working with an array of numbers. In the Xcode Playgrounds “results” section, you can either click the Quick Look “eye” icon, or click the little results rectangle to get an inline results … Continue reading Playgro

Simulating Antibiotic Resistance Scientist Gains Fame from Forbes

Tuesday, February 13, 13:42 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

IBM scientist Flaviu Cipcigan has high ambitions. Despite recently being listed on Forbes magazine’s European 30 under 30 list for science and healthcare, he believes there is still much work to do to raise awareness and solve the challenges he is attempting to address with his research. “Antibiotic resistance is a problem that doesn’t inspire […] The post Simulating Antibi

Apple design, squircles, and curvature

Tuesday, February 13, 11:30 UTC @ John D. Cook

A “squircle” is a sort of compromise between a square and circle, but one that differs from a square with rounded corners. It’s a shape you’ll see, for example, in some of Apple’s designs. A straight line has zero curvature, and a circle with radius r has curvature 1/r. So in a rounded square the […]

This Week in Rust 221

Tuesday, February 13, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

There Are No Competitive Smartwatch Chips From Qualcomm

Tuesday, February 13, 02:30 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ron Amadeo, writing for Ars Technica: Ars Technica would like to wish a very special second birthday to the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 SoC. While most flagship SoCs have a life cycle of about one year on the top of the market, over the weekend the Wear 2100 will celebrate two years as the least awful smartwatch SoC you can use in an Android Wear device. It’s positively ancient at this point. Seriously though, Qualcomm has seemingly abandoned the smartwatch market. The

Conflicts are rarely just about the cards on the table

Tuesday, February 13, 00:42 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

New in Basecamp: Improved Schedule Cards

Tuesday, February 13, 00:40 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Swift Tip: String to Data and Back

Tuesday, February 13, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

When converting a string into data, the return type is optional. For example: let cafe: Data? = "Café".data(using: .utf8) // non-nil Is it safe to force-unwrap this value? Can it ever return nil? It depends. When you use a Unicode encoding (such as .utf8 or .utf16), you can safely force-unwrap. Strings in Swift use Unicode internally, so encoding a string using a Unicode encoding will always succeed. When you

Olympiad news

Monday, February 12, 23:21 UTC @ Complex Projective 4-Space

I’d like to open with congratulations to the talented students who made the leaderboard in the second round of the British Mathematical Olympiad. Some highlights worth mentioning: Three of the four team members for the European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad made … Continue reading →

Claim Chowder on Yours Truly Regarding a June Claim Chowder Regarding Whether the HomePod Has a ‘Touchscreen’

Monday, February 12, 22:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Yours truly in June, after first seeing HomePod: HomePod has a touchscreen on top. Clearly, we now know that’s wrong. Paul Kafasis called me out on this during the most recent episode of The Talk Show, and it’s clear that I was wrong. It certainly is a touch panel, and it does light up and animate, but whatever you want call the part that lights up and animates, it’s

Cultivating an Inclusive Culture

Monday, February 12, 20:59 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

★ The Threat to the Mac: The Growing Popularity of Non-Native Apps

Monday, February 12, 19:29 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The real problem facing the Mac are the number of developers creating non-native “Mac” apps and the number of users who don’t have a problem with them.

IBM Research Wins ISSCC Lewis Winner Award for 4th Time in 15 Years

Monday, February 12, 16:36 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

If research in silicon chips were a sport, the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference would be its Olympics, and the Lewis Winner Award for Outstanding Paper the equivalent of the 100 meter gold medal. As announced during the plenary session of ISSCC 2018 today, IBM Research has won this coveted award for the 2017 conference […] The post IBM Research Wins ISSCC Lewis Winner Award for 4th

Cloud TPU machine learning accelerators now available in beta

Monday, February 12, 14:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By John Barrus, Product Manager for Cloud TPUs, Google Cloud and Zak Stone, Product Manager for TensorFlow and Cloud TPUs, Google Brain Team Starting today, Cloud TPUs are available in beta on Google Cloud Platform (GCP) to help machine learning (ML) experts train and run their ML models more quickly.

GPUs in Kubernetes Engine now available in beta

Monday, February 12, 13:59 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Yoshi Tamura, Product Manager, Google Kubernetes Engine Last year we introduced our first GPU offering for Google Kubernetes Engine with the alpha launch of NVIDIA Tesla GPUs and received an amazing customer response

Replacing flatMap With compactMap

Monday, February 12, 11:37 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Swift 4.1 ships with the (still in beta) Xcode 9.3 and brings more changes to the Swift language and the Swift standard library. Apple intends it as a source compatible upgrade to Swift 4.0 but I have hit one source code change that I am guessing will be widespread. Using flatMap on a sequence (like an Array) filtering anything that maps to nil is now deprecated and replaced by compactMap.

The Impact of Blockchain Technology Part 2: Ethereum Blockchain Technology and Smart Contracts

Monday, February 12, 11:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

It’s clear that blockchain applications have a promising future for information technology. Mario Merino introduced blockchain fundamentals in our previous post. In this post, Sr. Developer Pablo Orozco explores the impact of Ethereum blockchain technology and Smart Contracts. First Things First Bitcoin is a distributed, decentralized, peer-to-peer, electronic cash system and the first strong example […] The post

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® CloudStack® v4.11

Monday, February 12, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Mature Open Source Enterprise Cloud platform powers billions of dollars in transactions for the world's largest Cloud providers. Wakefield, MA —12 February 2018— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today Apache® CloudStack® v4.11, the latest version of the turnkey enterprise Cloud orchestration

Book Update: First Review!

Monday, February 12, 08:09 UTC @ Backreaction

The final proofs are done and review copies were sent out. One of the happy receivers, Emmanuel Rayner, read the book within two days and so we have a first review on Goodreads now. That’s not counting the two-star review by someone who I am very sure hasn’t read the book because he “reviewed” it before there were review copies. Tells you all about online ratings you need to know. The German

Book Update: First Review!

Monday, February 12, 08:09 UTC @ Backreaction

The final proofs are done and review copies were sent out. One of the happy receivers, Emmanuel Rayner, read the book within two days and so we have a first review on Goodreads now. That’s not counting the two-star review by someone who I am very sure hasn’t read the book because he “reviewed” it before there were review copies. Tells you all about online ratings you need to know. The German

Meet the IBM Inventor Who Built his First Circuit at 8

Monday, February 12, 07:31 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

National Inventors’ Day is a day to honor inventors and their genius. At the IBM Research Lab in Zurich, the list of inventors is long, but we were able to catch up with one of your newly appointed Master Inventors, Lukas Czornomaz, who talks about his career and some of the patents that were granted along […] The post Meet the IBM Inventor Who Built his First Circuit at 8<

New podcast alert: WorkLife with Adam Grant, a TED original, premieres Feb. 28

Monday, February 12, 03:00 UTC @ TED Blog

Adam Grant to Explore the Psychology of Unconventional Workplaces as Host of Upcoming New TED Original Podcast “WorkLife” Organizational psychologist, professor, bestselling author and TED speaker Adam Grant is set to host a new TED original podcast series titled WorkLife with Adam Grant, which will explore unorthodox work cultures in search of surprising and actionable

Liouville-Green approximation

Sunday, February 11, 22:14 UTC @ John D. Cook

Suppose you have a differential equation of the form If the function f(x) is constant, the differential equation is easy to solve in closed form. But when it is not constant, it is very unlikely that closed form solutions exist. But there may be useful closed form approximate solutions. There is no linear term in […]

Linguistics Using Category Theory

Sunday, February 11, 00:26 UTC @ Azimuth

  Now students in the Applied Category Theory 2018 school are reading about categories applied to linguistics. Read the blog article here for more: • Jade Master and Cory Griffith, Linguistics using category theory, The n-Category Café, 6 February 2018. This was written by my grad student Jade Master along with Cory Griffith, an undergrad […]

Iterating between theory and code

Saturday, February 10, 16:15 UTC @ John D. Cook

Yesterday I said on Twitter “Time to see whether practice agrees with theory, moving from LaTeX to Python. Wish me luck.” I got a lot of responses to that because it describes the experience of a lot of people. Someone asked if I’d blog about this. The content is confidential, but I’ll talk about the […]

photostream 112

Saturday, February 10, 16:15 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Melrose, MA (2017)

A ``new'' ``application'' of Ramsey Theory/A Truly ``bad'' math song

Saturday, February 10, 15:10 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Ian Parberry once told me (though I doubt he originated it- The first link I found says it was Mark Twain) to a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail Indeed. Since I am teaching a grad course Ramsey theory and its ``Applications'' (I got 24 students, which is more than I thought I would- including around 10 ugrads who are taking it because `all the cool kids are taking it' ) I have been taking the hammer of Ramsey Theory and looking for nails t

Web Design Advice

Saturday, February 10, 13:41 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Various and Sundry

Friday, February 09, 16:33 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I recently spent some time looking at old postings on this blog, partly because of writing this blog entry, partly because Gil Kalai got me a copy of his book Gina Says. For a moment I thought this would be … Continue reading →

Guidelines for future hypertext systems

Friday, February 09, 15:09 UTC @ Hacker Noon - Medium

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 9 February 2018

Friday, February 09, 14:24 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

We've had a great week! Here's what happened:: "Success at Apache" –the blog series from the Apache Community that focuses on why the ASF "just works". - A Newbie's Narrative by Kuhu Shukla https://... ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - The Apache Software Foundation 2018 Vision Stateme

Celebrating Abu Sebastian on National Inventors’ Day

Friday, February 09, 07:02 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In recognition of National Inventors’ Day, IBM researcher, Abu Sebastian, writes about his life as an inventor and his research on phase-change memory devices. Inventions come in different forms. Often, they are specific tricks or improvements that help us overcome a roadblock that presents itself when developing a specific product or prototype. But what really […] The post Cele

Meet 12 Companies From the YC Winter 2018 Batch

Thursday, February 08, 18:35 UTC @ Y Combinator

At Y Combinator, founders decide when they want to announce that they’re part of the program. Meet 12 of the companies who have announced that they’re part of the YC Winter 2018 batch so far.

Why Is There Something, Rather Than Nothing?

Thursday, February 08, 17:19 UTC @ Sean Carroll

A good question! Or is it? I’ve talked before about the issue of why the universe exists at all (1, 2), but now I’ve had the opportunity to do a relatively careful job with it, courtesy of Eleanor Knox and … Continue reading →

Applying the Escalation Policy — CRE life lessons

Thursday, February 08, 17:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Will Tipton, Site Reliability Engineer and Alex Bramley, Customer Reliability Engineer In past posts, we’ve discussed the importance of creating an explicit policy document describing how to escalate SLO violations, and given a

Why Toys?

Thursday, February 08, 17:00 UTC @ Y Combinator

Some of the biggest technology companies look like toys in the beginning. From a classical business building perspective, this shouldn't happen. Toys are for fun. Businesses, especially huge ones, are for making money. Toys are small and of limited use. Large companies contain multitudes and perform a huge array of functions.

For the Love of Algorithms

Thursday, February 08, 12:42 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Wired magazine labelled 2017 as The Year We Fell Out of Love with Algorithms. The article goes on to talk about how algorithms give us filter bubbles, affect elections, propagate biases and eliminate privacy. The article at the end argues that we shouldn't blame the algorithm but the people and companies behind them. Every day algorithms decide what music we listen to, what posts we see on Facebook

Code Size Optimization Mode in Swift 4.1

Thursday, February 08, 10:00 UTC @ Swift.org

In Swift 4.1 the compiler now supports a new optimization mode which enables dedicated optimizations to reduce code size. The Swift compiler comes with powerful optimizations. When compiling with -O the compiler tries to transform the code so that it executes with maximum performance. However, this improvement in runtime performance can sometimes come with a tradeoff of increased code size. With the new -Osize optimizati

«The limits of Hyperloop» en Mapping Ignorance

Thursday, February 08, 09:30 UTC @ brucknerite

During 2017 we have been witnessing the first tests of what might be called an integral hyperloop system at the Virgin Hyperloop One installations in Las Vegas, Nevada. Virgin Hyperloop One — named Hyperloop One before Virgin Group’s entry into its shareholder structure — leads, by its own merits, the pack of companies pursuing the … Continúa leyendo «T

Healthy, Wealthy & Wise | Jason Cohen, WPEngine | BoS USA 2017

Thursday, February 08, 09:23 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Jason Cohen,  Founder, WPEngine Jason Cohen is a hugely successful entrepreneur – he is the founder of Smart Bear Software and WPEngine (which recently passed $100m in annual revenue). In this, his 4th talk at Business of Software Conference, he raises the issue of Founder Health. Are you the Hacker News ‘Founder in Pain’? Or […] The post Healthy, Wealthy

GCP is building its second Japanese region in Osaka

Thursday, February 08, 00:04 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Shinichi Abe, Managing Director, Google Cloud Japan Since we launched the Tokyo region in 2016, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) has emerged as a leading destination for Asian-Pacific businesses that want to build applications in the cloud. To fulfill this growth, we’re building a second Japanese

Nicolas Hafner: Shader Pipelines and Effects - Gamedev

Wednesday, February 07, 23:34 UTC @ Planet Lisp

In the last entry I talked about Trial's way of handling shaders and how they are integrated into the object system to allow inheritance and composition. This time we'll take a look at how that system is extended to allow entire pipelines of effects and rendering systems. Back in the olden days you could get away with a single pass to render everything. In fact, the fixed-function pipeline of GL 2.1 works that way, as d

The Post-Moneyball World and Optimizing for Developer Happiness

Wednesday, February 07, 19:23 UTC @ tecosystems

When Moneyball was published in 2003, it was something of a phenomenon. The book, ostensibly about a baseball team’s efforts to compete in spite of more limited financial resources, was in fact a vehicle for evidence based decision making and the opportunities inherent in market inefficiences. There were a few clubs at the time like

The Post-Moneyball World and Optimizing for Developer Happiness

Wednesday, February 07, 19:23 UTC @ tecosystems

When Moneyball was published in 2003, it was something of a phenomenon. The book, ostensibly about a baseball team’s efforts to compete in spite of more limited financial resources, was in fact a vehicle for evidence based decision making and the opportunities inherent in market inefficiences. There were a few clubs at the time like

Announcing Spring Cloud GCP—integrating your favorite Java framework with Google Cloud

Wednesday, February 07, 18:31 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By João André Martins, Software Engineer For many years, the Spring Framework has been an innovative force in the Java ecosystem. Spring and its vast ecosystem are widely adopted, and are among the most popular Java frameworks. To do more for developers in the Spring community and meet our developers where they are, we’re announcing the

Quicklisp news: Quicklisp implementation stats for 2017+

Wednesday, February 07, 14:50 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Here are some raw HTTP request stats for each CL implementation supported by Quicklisp from 2017-01-01 onward. Each request corresponds roughly to downloading a single project. SBCL: 4,518,774 requestsClozure CL: 488,057 CLISP: 34,767LispWorks: 25,700ABCL: 23,913 Allegro: 19,501ECL: 19,027CLASP: 3,335CMUCL: 965MKCL: 79Scieneer: 0I gathered this info to check Scieneer activity levels to

Which problems make good research problems?

Wednesday, February 07, 14:13 UTC @ Backreaction

mini-problem [answer here] Scientists solve problems; that’s their job. But which problems are promising topics of research? This is the question I set out to answer in Lost in Math at least concerning the foundations of physics. A first, rough, classification of research problems can be made using Thomas Kuhn’s cycle of scientific theories. Kuhn’s cycle consists of a phase of “normal science

Which problems make good research problems?

Wednesday, February 07, 14:13 UTC @ Backreaction

mini-problem [answer here] Scientists solve problems; that’s their job. But which problems are promising topics of research? This is the question I set out to answer in Lost in Math at least concerning the foundations of physics. A first, rough, classification of research problems can be made using Thomas Kuhn’s cycle of scientific theories. Kuhn’s cycle consists of a phase of “normal science

Social Support

Wednesday, February 07, 13:11 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Startup Investor School Preview with Geoff Ralston

Wednesday, February 07, 10:15 UTC @ Y Combinator

This episode covers Startup Investor School. Startup Investor School is a free, 4-day course designed to educate early stage investors interested in investing in startups. You can sign up at investor.startupschool.org.

Guest Post – Why Removing Our Pricing Page Made For Good Business | Leon Atherton, IDR Solutions

Wednesday, February 07, 09:59 UTC @ Business of Software USA

BoS Editor: This blog post is written by our friend Leon at IDR Solutions. IDR Solutions are regular attendees at BoS Events – in fact Leon wrote this as a response to our recent Scaling SaaS Marketing Hangout. Join the conversation on Twitter – Leon tweets at @AthertonLeon. On the recent hangout with Andrus Purde, […] The post Guest Post – Why Removing Our Prici

Brenty’s First Pod

Wednesday, February 07, 05:49 UTC @ inessential.com

RSParser is now a CocoaPod! It’s my first. I’m super-proud of myself for taking this the last few tiny steps of the way there — Silver Fox did all the rest of the much-appreciated work. This means that if you’re a CocoaPods user, you can now go forth and parse feeds. Still to do: support Carthage and Swift Package Manager. And, after this repo, there are at least a half-dozen mor

A Categorical Semantics for Causal Structure

Wednesday, February 07, 05:29 UTC @ Azimuth

  The school for Applied Category Theory 2018 is up and running! Students are blogging about papers! The first blog article is about a diagrammatic method for studying causality: • Joseph Moeller and Dmitry Vagner, A categorical semantics for causal structure, The n-Category Café, 22 January 2018. Make sure to read the whole blog conversation, […]

Mitigating Bias in AI Models

Wednesday, February 07, 01:19 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Artificial intelligence (AI) holds significant power to improve the way we live and work, but AI systems are only as effective as the data they’re trained on. Bad training data can lead to higher error rates and biased decision making, even when the underlying model is sound. As the adoption of AI increases, the issue […] The post Mitigating Bias in AI Models appeared first on

★ HomePod

Tuesday, February 06, 23:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

I’ve been testing Apple’s new HomePod for the last week or so, and this is the first product review I’ve written that could be accurately summarized in the length of a tweet, and an old-school 140-character tweet at that: HomePod does exactly what Apple says it does, doesn’t do anything more than what Apple says it does, and costs $349. There.

Doing Mod N Via Mod R

Tuesday, February 06, 22:51 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Variations on Montgomery’s trick Peter Montgomery is a cryptographer at Microsoft. Just recently, Joppe Bos and Arjen Lenstra have edited a book titled Topics in Computational Number Theory Inspired by Peter L. Montgomery. The chapters range to Montgomery’s work on elliptic curves, factoring, evaluating polynomials, computing null-spaces of matrices over finite fields, and FFT extensions […]

The Big Idea: How to find and hire the best employees

Tuesday, February 06, 21:47 UTC @ TED Blog

So, you want to hire the best employee for the job? Or perhaps you’re the employee looking to be hired. Here’s some counterintuitive and hyper-intuitive advice that could get the right foot in the door. Expand your definition of the “right” resume Here’s the hypothetical situation: a position opens up at your company, applications start […]

On Missing the Point

Tuesday, February 06, 21:08 UTC @ inessential.com

(Disclaimer: before I get started, I should take extra care to note that I don’t speak for Omni. This is my personal blog, with my personal opinions.) Every time I make some criticism of the App Store — that, for instance, the 30% cut for Apple is too high, or that free trials would be a good thing — some number of people respond that Apple is a business and they’re allowed to do what they’re doing. They may also remind me that this is capitalism, and that I can vote wi

Interruption is Not Collaboration

Tuesday, February 06, 17:18 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Why we used Elastifile Cloud File System on GCP to power drug discovery

Tuesday, February 06, 17:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Woody Sherman, Chief Science Officer and Vipin Sachdeva, Principal Investigator, Silicon Therapeutics [Editor’s note: Last year, Silicon Therapeutics talked about how they used Google Cloud Platform (GCP) to perform massive drug discovery virtual screening. In this guest post, they discuss the performa

Eloquent mathematical writing

Tuesday, February 06, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Sir Michael Atiyah recommends Hermann Weyl’s book The Classical Groups for its clarity and beautiful prose. From my interview with Atiyah: Hermann Weyl is my great model. He used to write beautiful literature. Reading it was a joy because he put a lot of thought into it. Hermann Weyl wrote a book called The Classical Groups, […]

This Week in Rust 220

Tuesday, February 06, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

"How can you use your research for ugrad projects?'- the wrong question

Tuesday, February 06, 03:30 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I was helping a math PhD who worked in computable ramsey theory prepare his teaching and research statements for his job application. One of the questions various schools wanted to know was How can you use your research as the basis for undergraduate projects? His answer was kind of a cheat- Ramsey Theory was combinatorics which ugrads can work on without too much prior knowledge (true), computability theory could be picked up (not true), and the chance to combine the

Swift Tip: Networking with Codable

Tuesday, February 06, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In the very first Swift Talk we built a tiny networking library, leveraging Swift’s structs and generics for type-safety and testability. This was in June 2016, and we were still working with Swift 2.2. A lot has changed since then — so let’s revisit the code and make use of Swift’s latest tricks! The basic idea was to separate the description of an endpoint from the code executing the network request. The descript

The world needs more modest, linear growth companies. Please make some.

Monday, February 05, 23:46 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Deep Learning Training Times Get Significant Reduction

Monday, February 05, 13:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Our IBM Research AI team has developed a novel compression algorithm that could significantly improve training times for deep learning models in large-scale AI systems. Using this technique, we show for the first time that it is possible to dramatically reduce communication overheads during training by 40-200X over existing methods. These results, which mark a […] The post Deep Learning Training Times

Success at Apache: A Newbie’s Narrative

Monday, February 05, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

by Kuhu Shukla As I sit at my desk on a rather frosty morning with my coffee, looking up new JIRAs from the previous day in the Apache Tez project, I feel rather pleased. The latest community release vote is complete, the bug fixes that we so badly needed are in and the new release that we tested out internally on our many thousand strong cluster is looking good. Today I am looking at a new stack trace from a different Apache project process and it i

Product Rules (+ When To Break Them): A BoS Playlist

Monday, February 05, 10:15 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Product Development is the bread and butter of the SaaS Business. Seeing the seed of your idea grow into something useable and sellable – that’s the stuff of dreams. But the road to a market-ready product is filled with Product Development potholes. What are the rules you need to abide by when building a great product? […] The post Product Rules (+ When To Break Them): A BoS Playlist appeared first

Notification Handling on WatchKit

Monday, February 05, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

According to our own Richard Turton, notifications are one of the key interaction modes on Apple Watch. A well-designed notification quickly presents any pertinent information to the user and may also give them the opportunity to act on said information. In fact, to many users, “a notification from your app is essentially your app”1

Site migration

Sunday, February 04, 20:03 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Update: The migration of LtU to new servers is complete. If you notice any issues with the site, please post in this thread (if you can), or email me at antonvs8 at (gmail domain). Original announcement appears below: This evening (Sunday, US Eastern time), Lambda the Ultimate will be migrated to new servers. The site will be offline for around 30 minutes, while this migration and some database maintenance is in progress. The new platform is

Pondering AI’s future with Azeem Azhar

Sunday, February 04, 19:47 UTC @ x.ai

This post is part of x.ai’s ‘Future of Jobs’ interview series. We’re talking to leaders and mavericks to find out how emerging technologies like AI are changing how they do their jobs. You can find all the posts in the series here. Named a LinkedIn “Top Voice” for the past two years, Azeem Azhar has… The post Pondering AI’s future with Azeem Azhar appeared first on

Pyrofex

Sunday, February 04, 01:53 UTC @ Azimuth

Mike Stay is applying category theory to computation at a new startup called Pyrofex. And this startup has now entered a deal with RChain. But let me explain why I’m interested. I’m interested in applied category theory… but this is special. Mike Stay came to work with me at U.C. Riverside after getting a master’s […]

TurtleWare: cl-charms crash course

Sunday, February 04, 00:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Writing a new CLIM backend This work is meant as a showcase how to write a new McCLIM backend. To make it more interesting to me I'm writing it using cl-charms library which is a Common Lisp library for ncurses - console manipulation library for UNIX systems. During development I'm planning to make notes about necessary steps. If possible I'll also write a test suite for backends which will test the functionality from most basic parts (like creating windows) to more so

Zach Beane: Planet Lisp is back on twitter

Saturday, February 03, 18:32 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Years ago, Hans Hübner created the @planet_lisp twitter account and made some Lisp software to keep it updated with recent posts from Planet Lisp. But it stopped working last summer, and he offered to let someone else run it, so I wrote new software and it should be working again. This post is half announcement, half a test to make sure the

Focus on the most important terms

Saturday, February 03, 17:07 UTC @ John D. Cook

Consider the following Taylor series for sin(θ/7) and the following two functions based on the series, one takes only the first non-zero term def short_series(x): return 0.14285714*x and a second that three non-zero terms. def long_series(x): return 0.1425714*x - 4.85908649e-04*x**3 + 4.9582515e-07*x**5 Which is more accurate? Let’s make a couple plots plot to see. First […]

Tapping Machine Learning to Foster Greater Use of Biomimicry for Innovation

Saturday, February 03, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Knowledge transfer across domains leads to significant breakthroughs in science and technology. For example, through biomimicry, innovators get inspiration from nature/biology to solve complex engineering problems. An exciting example of biomimicry is the recent creation of artificial materials that imitate the surface of cicada’s wings and gecko’s skin, which have antibacterial properties due to their […] The post

Scaling and Monte Carlo integration methods

Friday, February 02, 23:11 UTC @ John D. Cook

Here’s an apparent paradox. You’ll hear that Monte Carlo methods are independent of dimension, and that they scale poorly with dimension. How can both statements be true? The most obvious way to compute multiple integrals is to use product methods, analogous to the way you learn to compute multiple integrals by hand. Unfortunately the amount […]

Toward effective cloud governance: designing policies for GCP customers large and small

Friday, February 02, 17:04 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Grace Mollison, Cloud Solutions Architect, and Marco Cavalli, Product Manager When it comes to security and governance, not all orgs are created equal. A mom-and-pop shop has different needs than a large enterprise, and startups have different requirements than, say, a local government. Google Cloud Platform (GCP) customers come in all shapes and sizes, and so do the identity and access

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 2 February 2018

Friday, February 02, 14:49 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Hello, February. Let's review what the Apache community have been busy with over the past week: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - The Apache Software Foundation 2018 Vision Statement https://... - Next Board Meeting: 21 February. Board calendar and minutes http://

How to use Weaveworks free tier for continuous delivery, monitoring and alerts for Kubernetes Engine

Friday, February 02, 14:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Steve George, COO, Weaveworks Editor’s Note: Today we hear from our partner Weaveworks, which recently integrated its Weave Cloud container and microservices management tools with Google Kubernetes Engine. Read on to learn how Weave Cloud can make it easier to deploy and monitor your applications to Kubernetes Engine. At Weaveworks, our goal is to help developers create and operate Kubernetes-based applications. An

Automating Code Generation for Deep Learning Models from Research Papers

Friday, February 02, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In an upcoming presentation at the 2018 AAAI Conference, our team of deep learning experts at IBM Research India propose a new and exploratory technique that automatically ingests and infers deep learning algorithms in published research papers and recreates them in source code for inclusion in libraries for multiple deep learning frameworks (Tensorflow, Keras, Caffe). With […] The post Automating Code

End-to-End Open-Domain QA via Multi-Passage Reading Comprehension

Friday, February 02, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Recently, impressive progress has been made in neural network question answering (QA) systems which can analyze a passage to answer a question. These systems work by matching a representation of the question to the text to find the relevant answer phrase. But what if the text is potentially all of Wikipedia?  And what if the […] The post End-to-End Open-Domain QA via Multi-Passage Reading Comprehension a

IBM Research AI at the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

Friday, February 02, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

At the 32nd AAAI conference on artificial intelligence, IBM will share significant progress from its AI research team, including technical papers as well as results from the company’s ongoing collaboration with academic institutions through the MIT IBM Watson AI Lab and the AI Horizons Network. Among the featured IBM AI research projects that will be […] The post IBM Research AI at the AAAI Conferen

Member of the Band – Juan Pablo Blanco Scrum Master

Friday, February 02, 11:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Juan Pablo Blanco Scrum Master appeared first

Nicolas Hafner: Integrating Shaders and Objects - Gamedev

Friday, February 02, 10:22 UTC @ Planet Lisp

In this entry I'll describe the way in which shaders are integrated into the object system in Trial. It serves as a predecessor to the next entry, which will be about shader pipelines. In case you're not familiar with modern graphics programming, a shader is a piece of code that runs on the GPU during a particular stage in the

Behind the Architecture of Hyperledger Fabric

Friday, February 02, 08:40 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

A new paper, from the IBM scientists behind many of the thousands of lines of code in Hyperledger Fabric, reveals the rationale and the thought process for the architecture, for the first time. It all started about two years ago with late night calls between Zurich and the US. IBM researchers were bouncing ideas off […] The post Behind the Architecture of Hyperledger Fabric appeared first

Onda Marciana —con @brucknerite como estrella invitada

Friday, February 02, 08:16 UTC @ brucknerite

¿Aún no conocéis Onda Marciana? Es un magnífico podcast con guión y locución de Javier Peláez (@irreductible) y Antonio Martínez Ron (@aberron), y producción, ambientación y música original de Javi Álvarez. Si os suena este elenco catastrófico es porque son las personas que hay detrás de Catástrofe Ultravioleta, una de las mejores cosas que le ha ocurrido … Continúa leyendo

Quicklisp news: Download stats for January, 2018

Friday, February 02, 00:21 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Here are the raw Quicklisp download stats for January 2018. 20452 alexandria 17822 closer-mop 16236 cl-ppcre 15928 split-sequence 15762 babel 15131 iterate 14929

Why Micro.blog is Not Another App.net

Thursday, February 01, 21:01 UTC @ inessential.com

We could be excused for thinking that Micro.blog is like App.net — a Twitter alternative greeted with enthusiasm but that eventually closed. It’s not the same thing, though, and I’ll explain why. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network. That’s the important part: even if Micro.blog doesn’t last (though I believe it will), the idea —

Use Forseti to make sure your Google Kubernetes Engine clusters are updated for “Meltdown" and “Spectre”

Thursday, February 01, 20:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Andrew Hoying, Google Cloud Security Engineer Last month, Project Zero disclosed details about CPU vulnerabilities that have been referred to as “Meltdown” and “Spectre,” and we let you know that Google Cloud has been

Flying Blind

Thursday, February 01, 18:06 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Many computer science conferences have made a number of innovations such as a rebuttal phase, multi-tiered program committees, a hybrid journal/conference model with submission deadlines spread through the year. Not theoretical computer science which hasn't significantly changed their review process in the major conferences since allowing electronic submissions in the early 90's and an ever growing program committee now at 30 for FOCS.

Muon g-2 Anomaly Gone?

Thursday, February 01, 16:43 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I just learned some interesting news from Tommaso Dorigo’s blog. Go there for more details, but the news is the claim in these three papers that, accounting for GR effects on the precision measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment, … Continue reading →

GCP arrives in Canada with launch of Montréal region

Thursday, February 01, 16:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Dave Stiver, Product Manager Click here to view the French version, Merci! Our fifteenth Google Cloud Platform region and first region in Canada is now open for you to build applications and store data, and promises to significantly improve latency for GCP customers and e

White paper: Modernizing your .NET Application for Google Cloud

Thursday, February 01, 14:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Bryan Nairn, Product Marketing Manager Last week, we published a “move-and-improve” white paper about rearchitecting a monolithic .NET application using microservices. Today, we introduced the next installment in our series about migration entitled “Modernizing your .NET Application for Google Cloud." This paper dives into the detail

Loopback and create-react-app Developer Tutorial

Thursday, February 01, 10:25 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Recommended snack and song: Have a lovely bowl of rice pudding while listening to Auto!Automatic!! Loopback is amazing at REST API Service, and create-react-app is a neat little CLI that generates a solid starting point for a SPA (single page application). But putting them together can be… tricky! Nevertheless, we’ll give it a shot. tl;dr: […] The post Loopback and create-react-app De

Does Acquisition = Success? | Hangout with Jason Eckenroth

Thursday, February 01, 09:28 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Jason Eckenroth, Founder, ShipCompliant The 2 years since ShipCompliant’s sale has given its founder Jason Eckenroth plenty of time to think about the process of acquisition. Is it really the big win that it is so often made out to be? What’s more rewarding – the big cash cow, or sticking with the business through […] The post Does Acquisition = Success? | Hangout wit

Nicolas Hafner: Assets, Resources, and Loaders - Gamedev

Thursday, February 01, 00:23 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Welcome to a new article series! I've decided to try to record my thoughts on various matters about game development. This will include observations, discoveries, explanations of existing systems, and proposals for improvements in related projects. Most of this will be directly related to Shirakumo's game engine Trial and the Treehouse g

Celebrating five years of this blog, and a change of pace

Thursday, February 01, 00:17 UTC @ composition.al

I started this blog five years ago, in January 2013. At the time, I lived in Bloomington, Indiana and was in the middle of my fifth year of grad school. I had started working on a new project with a new advisor in my fourth year — not exactly a highly recommended approach to finishing a Ph.D. — and I wanted a place to write about what I was working on. I hadn’t managed to get any papers about my project accepted yet, but t

Integrating polynomials over a sphere or ball

Wednesday, January 31, 23:19 UTC @ John D. Cook

Spheres and balls are examples of common words that take on a technical meaning in math, as I wrote about here. Recall the the unit sphere in n dimensions is the set of points with distance 1 from the origin. The unit ball is the set of points of distance less than or equal to 1 from the […]

Quicklisp news: January 2018 Quicklisp dist update now available

Wednesday, January 31, 22:09 UTC @ Planet Lisp

New projects: bodge-blobs-support — Common utilities for loading/distributing foreign libraries — The Unlicensebodge-chipmunk — Wrapper over chipmunk 2d physics library — MITchipmunk-blob — Chipmunk physics foreign library collection — MIT

Upload App Previews with Transporter

Wednesday, January 31, 20:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

You can now use Transporter, Apple’s command-line delivery tool, to upload app previews to iTunes Connect. Transporter integrates with your content management system to deliver your app metadata in bulk using XML, which is especially useful for adding and managing multiple localizations. For details on using Transporter to upload app previews, see the App Metadata Specification.Learn more about app previews.

The Omni Show #7: Ken Case Talks About the 2018 Roadmap

Wednesday, January 31, 18:49 UTC @ inessential.com

Check out episode #7 (I wish we had called it 007) where Ken Case talks about all the good stuff coming up in 2018. There will be new releases of OmniOutliner, OmniPlan, and OmniGraffle — plus a whole bunch of great stuff for OmniFocus 3.0 for Mac and iOS, including tags, JavaScript scripting, and OmniFocus for the web. You can subscribe to the podcast or just listen to this episode — there’s a

A script to save the last backup date in SuperDuper

Wednesday, January 31, 18:37 UTC @ Ole Begemann

I’m a very happy SuperDuper user. If you’re not aware, SuperDuper is a Mac app that can create bootable clones from SSDs and hard drives — it’s a great complement to other backup strategies like Time Machine and online backup.1 Saving the date of t

Finer-grained security using custom roles for Cloud IAM

Wednesday, January 31, 17:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Rohit Khare, Product Manager and Pradeep Madhavarapu, Engineering Manager IT security aims to ensure the right people have access to the right resources and use them in the right ways. Making sure those are the only things that can happen is the "principle of least privilege," a cornerstone of enterprise security policy. Custom roles for

Vsevolod Dyomkin: Minimal Perfect Hash-Tables in Common Lisp

Wednesday, January 31, 16:49 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Recently, my twitter pal @ifesdjeen wrote a line that resonated with me: "Looks like it's easier for people to read 40 blog posts than a single whitepaper." And although he used it in a negative context, I recognized it as a very precise (and, actually, positive) description of what a research engineer does: read a whitepaper (or a dozen, for what it's worth) and transform it into working code and - as a possible byproduct - into a blo

Physics Facts and Figures

Wednesday, January 31, 12:57 UTC @ Backreaction

Physics is old. Together with astronomy, it’s the oldest scientific discipline. And the age shows. Compared to other scientific areas, physics is a slowly growing field. I learned this from a 2010 paper by Larsen and van Ins. The authors counted the number of publications per scientific areas. In physics, the number of publications grows at an annual rate of 3.8%. This means it currently takes 18

Physics Facts and Figures

Wednesday, January 31, 12:57 UTC @ Backreaction

Physics is old. Together with astronomy, it’s the oldest scientific discipline. And the age shows. Compared to other scientific areas, physics is a slowly growing field. I learned this from a 2010 paper by Larsen and van Ins. The authors counted the number of publications per scientific areas. In physics, the number of publications grows at an annual rate of 3.8%. This means it currently takes 18

I gave up using Medium

Wednesday, January 31, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

A week ago I decided to remove all my publications from Medium. I’ve been using Medium together with my blog to publish articles, and also to find content from other publishers. I like how clean the design of the platform is, and how easy it is to discover new content based on other publications that you liked. However, several reasons made me decide to stop using it, remove my posts and focus on my personal blog instead. These are the reasons: P

Designing adaptive cyber-physical systems – from undersea monitoring to landing on Mars

Tuesday, January 30, 13:23 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Cyber-physical systems, or CPS for short, are sophisticated computer devices that work together to perform functions, control physical elements, and respond to human control. They are already being used in auto-pilot systems for aircraft, advanced robotic systems, smart grids, medical monitoring, and search and rescue. In fact, most Internet of Things (IoT) devices are CPS. […] The post Desi

Google Cloud Platform opens region in the Netherlands

Tuesday, January 30, 13:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Dave Stiver, Product Manager, Google Cloud Platform Click here for the Dutch version, bedankt! Our fourteenth Googl

How to Spot Influencer Fraud

Tuesday, January 30, 12:53 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Influencer Marketing is big business but in a very short amount of time it has become so rife with fraud you cannot trust what you read on social media. On Saturday, the New York Times published a detailed expose of the activities of a Social Media Influencer company called Devumi who sell fake and fraudulent […] The post How to Spot Influencer Fraud appeared first on

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Kibble™ as a Top-Level Project

Tuesday, January 30, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Open Source tools used for collecting, aggregating and visualizing software project activity. Wakefield, MA —30 January 2018— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today Apache® Kibble™ as a Top-Level Project (TLP). Apache Kibble is an activity reporting platform created to colle

This Week in Rust 219

Tuesday, January 30, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

15 Years of Multiverse Mania

Tuesday, January 30, 02:57 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Today is the 15th anniversary of the event that kicked off the Multiverse Mania that continues to this day, recently taking the form of a concerted attack on conventional notions of science. 2018 has seen an acceleration of this attack, … Continue reading →

Bounding the 3rd moment by the 4th moment

Tuesday, January 30, 02:28 UTC @ John D. Cook

For a random variable X, the kth moment of X is the expected value of Xk. For any random variable X with 0 mean, or negative mean, there’s an inequality that bounds the 3rd moment, m3 in terms of the 4th moment, m4: The following example shows that this bound is the best possible. Define u […]

Putting a brace under something in LaTeX

Tuesday, January 30, 01:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Here’s a useful LaTeX command that I learned about recently: \underbrace. It does what it sounds like it does. It puts a brace under its argument. I used this a few days ago in the post on the new prime record when I wanted to show that the record prime is written in hexadecimal as […]

Swift Tip: OpaquePointer vs. UnsafePointer

Tuesday, January 30, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

When you’re working with a C library, some pointers are imported as OpaquePointer, but other pointers are imported as UnsafePointer<struct_type>. The difference is found in the C header file. When a struct person is completely defined in the header file, any pointers to it will be imported by Swift as UnsafePointer<person>. This means we can also dereference the pointers, and look at the contents by calling .pointee on

Using iPad for Long-Form Writing

Monday, January 29, 20:19 UTC @ joe cieplinski

I fought the notion of a mechanical keyboard for my iPad for years. Part of the reason was every keyboard designed for a tablet I’ve tried (including Apple’s own Smart Keyboard) is just not good. Small keys. Crappy feel. I’ve never been able to type a sentence

California’s “State of the State”

Monday, January 29, 19:30 UTC @ Azimuth

On January 25th, Jerry Brown, governor of California, gave his last annual State of the State speech. It’s about looking forward to the future: tackling hard problems now. I wish more politicians were focused on this. You can see the whole speech annotated here. Here is the first part. The last line states the vision: […]

Lee Cronin’s ongoing quest for print-your-own medicine, and more news from TED speakers

Monday, January 29, 18:55 UTC @ TED Blog

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Print your own pharmaceutical factory. As part of an ongoing quest to make pharmaceuticals easier to manufacture, chemist Lee Cronin and his team at the University of Glasgow have designed a way to 3D-print a portable “factory” for the complicated and multi-step chemical reactions needed to create useful drugs. [

Guest Post: Nicole Yunger Halpern on What Makes Extraordinary Science Extraordinary

Monday, January 29, 17:45 UTC @ Sean Carroll

Nicole Yunger Halpern is a theoretical physicist at Caltech’s Institute for Quantum Information and Matter (IQIM).  She blends quantum information theory with thermodynamics and applies the combination across science, including to condensed matter; black-hole physics; and atomic, molecular, and optical … Continue reading →

12 best practices for user account, authorization and password management

Monday, January 29, 14:25 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Ian Maddox, GCP Solutions Architect Account management, authorization and password management can be tricky. For many developers, account management is a dark corner that doesn't get enough attention. For product managers and customers, the resulting experience often falls short of expectations. Fortunately, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) brings several tools to help you make good decisions

Publishing: Why are we doing it right and other sciences aren't?

Monday, January 29, 13:58 UTC @ Computational Complexity

(NOTE- this is NOT a `we hate Elsevier and the others' post- though I suspect the comments will be about that.) Alexandra Elbakyan has created a repository of science papers for scientists to share. She did this because too many papers were behind paywalls. An article about her (and the inspiration for this post) is here. Note that she has had some legal problems. But it got me thinking: I hav

The Apache Software Foundation 2018 Vision Statement

Monday, January 29, 12:01 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

The Apache Software Foundation describes its Vision Statement, the basis for the 5-year strategic plan in development. Our mission is to support communities that create and distribute Open Source software at no charge under the Apache License, per our Bylaws. To this end we provide mentoring, virtual collaboration space, and resou

The Apache® Software Foundation Announces ApacheCon™ and Supporting Global Events

Monday, January 29, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

World's largest Open Source foundation expands conference participation to serve Apache's diverse projects and their growing communities. Wakefield, MA —29 January 2018— The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, today announced ApacheCon™ and supporting events for 2018. <

Pushing liquids to their limits with next-gen materials simulation methods

Monday, January 29, 10:51 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Materials in industrial and engineering applications, such as iron and steel, are often used at extreme pressures and temperatures or in complex environments where their properties may be very different from those found under normal circumstances. Perhaps the most famous example of this in practice are the exterior tiles of the NASA Space Shuttle Columbia, […] The post Pushing liquids to their

Creating Custom Xcode Project Templates

Monday, January 29, 10:18 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

I recently wanted to play with some projects that did not use a main Storyboard. Starting from the single view app template it soon gets tiring to clean things up and add the boilerplate to the app delegate to create the window. This seems like a good time to learn how to create my own custom Xcode project template. Here are my notes for future reference. Where Are The Xcode Templates

Highly Recommended Viewing: A Rapid Overview of Machine Learning, Deep Water meta-Framework and 16 GPU EC2 Instances

Monday, January 29, 03:28 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

The first talk hits the mark on providing a rapid-fire quick history and update on machine learning and also provides an introduction to Amazon’s 16 GPU Amazon EC2 instance to train or act as the hardware foundation for the new … Continue reading →

Time Lords Manual: Inbox Zero

Sunday, January 28, 18:19 UTC @ x.ai

The Time Lords Manual is a series of 1-minute reads on how to become a master of your time. (You can read the Time Lords Manifesto here). There’s a reason the first communication platform Amy + Andrew worked on was email: that’s where the bulk of meetings are set and professional communications exchanged. Even with… The post Time Lords Manual: Inbox Zero appeared first on x.ai.

The hermeticism and rigidity of Xcode and its projects

Sunday, January 28, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

If you work with Xcode you are most likely familiar with its hermeticism. Compared to other programming languages, like Kotlin, where the build system is independent of the IDE (Gradle), in Xcode everything is together and not well documented. Xcode projects have build settings and build phases that are the input to the build system that Xcode uses. Have you ever searched for what each of the build settings means? You’ll most likely end up on StackOverflow or some random website where someone

Quick Links

Saturday, January 27, 20:33 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Various things that may be of interest, ordered from abstract math to concrete physics: Jacob Lurie is teaching a course this semester on Categorical Logic. Way back when I was a student at Harvard this is the kind of thing … Continue reading →

Emacs features that use regular expressions

Saturday, January 27, 17:10 UTC @ John D. Cook

The syntax of regular expressions in Emacs is a little disappointing, but the ways you can use regular expressions in Emacs is impressive. I’ve written before about the syntax of Emacs regular expressions. It’s a pretty conservative subset of the features you may be used to from other environments as summarized in the diagram below. But […]

Recommended: Using Automated Visual Inspection in LCD Production

Saturday, January 27, 11:19 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

Here is an example of what computer vision systems can do. In this example, Radiant Vision Systems® offers a glimpse into a vision system and how it works. In the video, Radiant Vision Systems® imaging photometers and colorimeters are applied at … Continue reading →

Recommended: Keys To Success With Computer Vision-Guided Robotics For Flexible Automation

Saturday, January 27, 11:06 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

If you are interested in computer vision-guided robotics there is a nice talk on the topic. David Dechow, Staff Engineer for Intelligent Robotics/Machine Vision, FANUC America Corporation provides guidance on where vision-guided robotics makes sense in different settings.  It discusses the … Continue reading →

Who is controlling whom

Saturday, January 27, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

Technology is everywhere nowadays. It’s the computer that we use every day, our smartphone, the watch that is connected to the Internet, our new and futurist car that provides you with the last data about the traffic. There used to be more distance between us technology, but it’s so widely adopted that nowadays we don’t know how to live without technology. I feel like a few years ago we were the ones controlling the technology, but more and more, it’s technology the one that is controlling us now

Talks from TEDNYC Idea Search 2018

Friday, January 26, 23:00 UTC @ TED Blog

TED is always looking for new voices with fresh ideas — and earlier this winter, we opened a challenge to the world: make a one-minute audition video that makes the case for your TED Talk. More than 1,200 people applied to be a part of the Idea Search program this year, and on Wednesday night at […]

★ HomePod’s Priorities

Friday, January 26, 21:17 UTC @ Daring Fireball

A lot of the knee-jerk “*Apple has finally lost its goddamn collective mind if they think people are going to spend $350 on a HomePod that costs three times as much as and has far fewer features than an Amazon Echo and they’re only banging the drum about sound quality because Siri has so many problems*” reaction is entirely from the perspective of people who agree with Amazon’s priorities regarding Alexa products.

Serverless is the New PaaS

Friday, January 26, 21:11 UTC @ tecosystems

Even as Amazon Web Services was ascending to a position of market dominance in the exploding category of Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) – a category, notably, that it created – and added new features and services at an improbable rate, there was one area in which the company pointedly did not invest in. While few remember this

Serverless is the New PaaS

Friday, January 26, 21:11 UTC @ tecosystems

Even as Amazon Web Services was ascending to a position of market dominance in the exploding category of Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) – a category, notably, that it created – and added new features and services at an improbable rate, there was one area in which the company pointedly did not invest in. While few remember this

Cloud Shell Tutorials: Learning experiences integrated into the Cloud Console

Friday, January 26, 17:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Marc Cohen, Developer Advocate A few weeks ago we released the Open in Cloud Shell feature, which lets a simple hyperlink open a cloud shell with an automatically cloned Github repo, preselected open files in the Cloud Editor and other features to make creating interactive content as easy as possible. T

Member of the Band – Sergio Monge DevOps Engineer

Friday, January 26, 16:27 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Sergio Monge DevOps Engineer appeared first on

Unified Swift Playgrounds

Friday, January 26, 16:04 UTC @ Indie Stack

The announcement of Swift Playgrounds 2.0 has me thinking again about Xcode Playgrounds: both about what a revelation they are, and about how disappointing they continue to be. When Xcode Playgrounds were first introduced (as “Swift Playgrounds”) in 2014, they were received as a groundbreaking new way for developers to write Swift code interactively. There … Continue reading

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 26 January 2018

Friday, January 26, 14:53 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Here's hoping you had a great week. The Apache community has been working on: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 21 February. Board calendar and minutes http://... ASF Infrastructure –our distributed team on three continents keeps the ASF's

Recommended Reading : The Best Open Source Machine Learning Frameworks

Friday, January 26, 14:28 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

This article is on machine learning and open source frameworks.  It covers open source frameworks. The frameworks cover the gamut of machine learning : supervised learning, unsupervised learning and reinforcement learning. If you are interested in machine learning this is … Continue reading →

From Art to Science

Friday, January 26, 14:18 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Q: Why did the neural net cross the road? A: Who cares along as it got to the other side. Whit Diffie and Martin Hellman in their classic 1976 paper talk about the transition of cryptography: Theoretical developments in information theory and computer science show promise of providing provably secure cryptosystems, changing this ancient art into a science. Indeed we have some very strong t

Recommended Reading: 7 Applications of Machine Learning in Pharma and Medicine

Friday, January 26, 14:12 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

If you are wondering what is happening in the area of machine learning and medicine – the short answer is : quite a bit. Across seven areas we are seeing advances in disease identification/diagnoses, personalized treatment, drug discover/manufacturing, clinical trial … Continue reading →

Notes from JMM 2018

Friday, January 26, 03:18 UTC @ bit-player

The annual Joint Mathematics Meeting always charges my batteries. Here are few items from this year’s gathering in San Diego. A Formal Affair In 1994 a document called the QED Manifesto made the rounds of certain mathematical mailing lists and … Continue reading →

★ Apple Previews iOS 11.3

Friday, January 26, 01:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

It’s almost like Apple held a little mini-WWDC over the last two days via Newsroom posts.

Evergreen Diary #9: On IndieWeb

Thursday, January 25, 21:21 UTC @ inessential.com

When IndieWeb started, some years back, the first thing I noticed was that they appeared to be against the idea of feeds — or, at least, what they called side feeds: RSS and similar. Their idea was that the data a reader might collect should be encoded in the page itself, using microformats. The argument (I think; I hope I’m not misrepresenting anyone) was that microformats are simpler than mantaining a separa

More Multiverse Madness

Thursday, January 25, 16:40 UTC @ Backreaction

The “multiverse” – the idea that our universe is only one of infinitely many – enjoys some credibility, at least in the weirder corners of theoretical physics. But there are good reasons to be skeptical, and I’m here to tell you all of them. Before we get started, let us be clear what we are talking about because there isn’t only one but multiple multiverses. The most commonly discussed ones are

More Multiverse Madness

Thursday, January 25, 16:40 UTC @ Backreaction

The “multiverse” – the idea that our universe is only one of infinitely many – enjoys some credibility, at least in the weirder corners of theoretical physics. But there are good reasons to be skeptical, and I’m here to tell you all of them. Before we get started, let us be clear what we are talking about because there isn’t only one but multiple multiverses. The most commonly discussed ones are

Easter eggs and yellow pigs

Thursday, January 25, 16:11 UTC @ John D. Cook

An Easter egg is a hidden feature, a kind of joke. The term was first used in video games but the idea is broader and older than that. For example, Alfred Hitchcock made a brief appearance in all his movies. And I recently heard that there’s a pineapple or reference to a pineapple in every […]

Big derivatives

Thursday, January 25, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Suppose you have a function of n variables f. The kth derivative of f is a kth order tensor [1] with nk components. Not all those tensor components are unique. Assuming our function f is smooth, the order in which partial derivatives are taken doesn’t matter. It only matters which variables you differentiate with respect […]

Singletonizer API Design Pattern

Thursday, January 25, 06:51 UTC @ APIDesign - Blogs

Recently I have successfully used the singletonizer API design pattern in Graal's Graph I/O API

Evergreen Diary #8: Coding Guidelines

Wednesday, January 24, 21:20 UTC @ inessential.com

I published the first draft of Evergreen’s Coding Guidelines yesterday. I posted this because I’d like to have people help me with the app — but I’m not ready yet. Or, rather, a few people who I know are starting to help, and I want to keep it small for now since I’ve never done this before. If you’re interested in helping, I hope you’ll forgive me as I take it slow and learn ho

New Tools for 64-bit Support in Xcode 9.3 Beta

Wednesday, January 24, 21:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

The last macOS release to support 32-bit apps without compromise is macOS High Sierra. Make sure future releases of your app are 64-bit compatible by using new diagnostic tools in Xcode 9.3 beta and testing on macOS 10.13.4 beta. This version of Xcode also builds 64-bit apps by default.Download Xcode 9.3 beta.

Reminder: 64-bit Requirement for Mac Apps

Wednesday, January 24, 21:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

Starting January 31, new apps submitted to the Mac App Store must support 64-bit, and Mac app updates and existing apps must support 64-bit starting June 2018. If you distribute your apps outside the Mac App Store, we highly recommend distributing 64-bit binaries to make sure your users can continue to run your apps on future versions of macOS. Build and submit your apps using Xcode 9.2.Learn more about distributing Mac apps.

Swift Playgrounds 2.0 Now Available

Wednesday, January 24, 18:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

The latest version of Swift Playgrounds includes new features to make it easier to discover even more content. Now you can subscribe to playgrounds from your favorite third-party creators, then browse and download their content directly within Swift Playgrounds. You’ll automatically see new and updated playgrounds in your subscriptions, a content gallery that shows all playgrounds in a single view, new robots, and much more.Learn more about Swift Playgrounds.

ARKit 1.5 Now Available

Wednesday, January 24, 18:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

iOS 11 is the biggest AR platform in the world, allowing you to create unparalleled augmented reality experiences for hundreds of millions of iOS users. Now you can build even more immersive experiences by taking advantage of the latest features of ARKit, available in iOS 11.3 beta. With improved scene understanding, your app can see and place virtual objects on vertical surfaces, and more accurately map irregularly shaped surfaces. Real world images, such as signs, posters, and artwork can be integrated in

Are coffee and wine good for you or bad for you?

Wednesday, January 24, 17:36 UTC @ John D. Cook

One study will say that coffee is good for you and then another will say it’s bad for you. Ditto with wine and many other things. So which is it: are these things good for you or bad for you? Probably neither. That is, these things that are endlessly studied with contradictory conclusions must not […]

How many degrees are in a Martian Year?

Wednesday, January 24, 14:38 UTC @ Computational Complexity

James Tanton gave a great talk at the JMM (Joint Math Meeting) in San Diego on how many degrees are in a Martian Year? but he didn't quite answer his title question. I found an excerpt of the talk on YouTube but still didn't quite answer the question, though he could have. The talk was How many degrees are in a Martian Year? Here is an excerpt on You Tube: here

Game-theoretic Approach to Tradition

Wednesday, January 24, 14:19 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

Imagine a simple one-shot coordination game between two players who don't know each other and can't communicate with each other. Each can pick one of two cards, either blue one or green one. If both choose the same card they each get $100. If they pick different cards they get nothing. Without being able to make a

Progress on the Frontier

Wednesday, January 24, 02:29 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

An almost exponential improvement in bounds against ACC Source from previous paper Cody Murray is a PhD student of Ryan Williams at MIT. He and Ryan have a new paper that greatly improves Ryan’s separation of nonuniform circuits from uniform nondeterministic time classes. The previous best separation was from , that is, nondeterministic time . […]

Why Use Costa Rica for Nearshore Software Development?

Tuesday, January 23, 20:59 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Since joining Gorilla Logic in 2014, I’ve had the privilege of speaking with a number of IT leaders who want agile, cost-competitive software development expertise to help them achieve their business transformation goals. Many of them ask why Gorilla Logic’s nearshore software development center in Costa Rica has attracted such an impressive clientele. Quite honestly, […] The post

How we built a serverless digital archive with machine learning APIs, Cloud Pub/Sub and Cloud Functions

Tuesday, January 23, 17:06 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Kees van Bemmel, Managing Director, Incentro [Editor’s note: Today we hear from Incentro, a digital service provider and Google partner, which recently built a digital asset management solution on top of GCP. It combines machine learning services like Cloud Vision and Speech APIs to easily find and tag digital assets, plus Cloud Pub/Sub and Cloud Functions for an automated, serverless

On HomePod

Tuesday, January 23, 16:26 UTC @ joe cieplinski

Let’s do a quick thought experiment. You’re Apple. You want to launch a smart speaker product, but you haven’t gotten one into the market yet. Years have passed, and some of the competitors (Amazon and Google) are making some headway, though their products are far from mainstream.

x.ai AI assistants now on your domain for MS Office 365 customers

Tuesday, January 23, 15:00 UTC @ x.ai

When we introduced our AI assistants Amy & Andrew to Microsoft Office 365, we took a step towards eliminating the hassle of scheduling meetings for knowledge workers everywhere. No longer was our technology limited to helping people who live in G-Suite, Microsoft diehards could hire Amy to manage their Outlook calendar and schedule their meetings… The post x.ai AI assistants now

Distribution of matches between two shuffled decks

Tuesday, January 23, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Take two desks of cards and shuffle them. They can be standard 52-card decks, though the number of cards in the decks doesn’t matter as long as they’re the same and the decks are fairly large. Now count the number of times the two desks match, i.e. how many times the same card is in […]

The 3 Laws of TDD: Focus on One Thing at a Time

Tuesday, January 23, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

When I was first learning TDD, I’d try to get to the First Step (a failing test) by writing a fully-formed test. But it often took a lot fiddling to get that test to run and fail. Sometimes this was because the production code took several steps to set up. Sometimes it was because the […]

Swift Tip: Codable Enums

Tuesday, January 23, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

If we have an enum wih associated types, the compiler can’t automatically generate Codable conformance yet. For example, let’s create an enum that can be one of two values: enum Either<A,B> { case left(A) case right(B) } If we use the latest Swift toolchain, we can conditionally make it conform to Codable (see this gist), but even i

Privacy-preserving sentence semantic similarity using InferSent embeddings and secure two-party computation

Monday, January 22, 20:26 UTC @ Terra Incognita

Privacy-preserving Computation Privacy-preserving computation or secure computation is a sub-field of cryptography where two (two-party, or 2PC) or multiple (multi-party, or MPC) parties can evaluate a function together without revealing information about the parties private input data to each other. The problem and the first solution to it were introduced in 1982 by an amazing...

Prediction of psychotic onset with AI: words portend the future

Monday, January 22, 20:19 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Psychiatrists characterize schizophrenia, a mental condition with devastating effects on those who suffer it, by a set of intuitively understandable concepts including “poverty of speech” and “flight of ideas.” These concepts, however, are subjective in the sense that their quantification depends significantly on the particular training and ultimate judgment of individual psychiatrists. The evaluation of […] The post

Double blind review: continuing the discussion

Monday, January 22, 16:00 UTC @ The Geomblog

My first two posts on double blind review triggered good discussion by Michael Mitzenmacher and Boaz Barak (see the comments on these posts for more). I thought I'd try to synthesize what I took away from the posts and how my own thinking has developed. First up, I think it's gratifying to see that the the bas

Masked And Animated Corners

Monday, January 22, 10:35 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Apple loves a rounded rectangle. They even sneaked a couple of improvements into iOS 11. I saw these two tips during WWDC 2017 and then forgot about them. Masked Corners You are most likely familiar with the technique of setting a corner radius using the Core Animation layer of a view. let blueView = UIView() blueView.backgroundColor = .blue blueView.layer.cornerRadius = 25.0 // ...view setup... The cornerRadius

Statebox: A Universal Language of Distributed Systems

Monday, January 22, 03:12 UTC @ Azimuth

guest post by Christian Williams A short time ago, on the Croatian island of Zlarin, there gathered a band of bold individuals—rebels of academia and industry, whose everyday thoughts and actions challenge the separations of the modern world. They journeyed from all over to learn of the grand endeavor of another open mind, an expert […]

Application: How machine learning will transform the way we look at medical images

Sunday, January 21, 21:33 UTC @ Architecting Beyond Twenty Twenty

One of the hottest topics today is around machine learning – you could be excused if you didn’t know that it actually has been around for a long time in a different context and survived the “AI winter”.  One area of … Continue reading →

Magic squares as matrices

Saturday, January 20, 20:26 UTC @ John D. Cook

If you view a 3 × 3 magic square as a matrix and raise it to the third power, the result is also a magic square. More generally, if you multiply an odd number of 3 × 3 magic squares together, the result is a magic square. For example, here are three magic squares that […]

Model-View-Controller without the Controller

Saturday, January 20, 05:21 UTC @ Cocoa with Love on Cocoa with Love

In the previous article, I presented a syntax for constructing views in a self-contained expression. The syntax comes from my upcoming CwlViews library, which I hope to release in a few weeks; but in the meantime, I wanted to take a look at the effect this syntax has on the application design pattern. View construction syntax might seem like a trivial matter of aesthetics but an app built around the syntax I present

This app could not be installed at this time

Saturday, January 20, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

I’ve spent a whole Sunday trying to get an Xcode project running. The project contains an iOS and watchOS app sharing code using frameworks. Moreover, I’ve automated the generation of the Xcode projects using XcodeGen. Everything seemed to be fine; I was able to generate the projects, compile the modules individually, run their tests, but at some point, I got stuck at something that after a few hours, can’t understand. Whenever I tried to run the

Evergreen Diary #7: Syncing and Immediate and Deferrable Actions

Friday, January 19, 21:29 UTC @ inessential.com

There are, as I mentioned previously, two types of syncable actions: immediate and deferrable. An immediate action is something like adding a feed: it requires that the server is reachable right now, so that the feed actually gets added. A deferrable action is something like marking articles as read. The sooner the server knows, the better, sure — but it can wait if necessary. It ca

Member of the Band – Edwin Retana Sr. Web Developer

Friday, January 19, 20:15 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our […] The post Member of the Band – Edwin Retana Sr. Web Developer appeared first on

Swift Forums Now Open!

Friday, January 19, 18:00 UTC @ Swift.org

We are delighted to announce that the Swift project has completed the process of migrating to the Swift Forums as the primary method for discussion and communication! The former mailing lists have been shut down and archived, and all mailing list content has been imported into the new forum system. The following @swift.org email lists will continue to function as before:

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 19 January 2018

Friday, January 19, 15:01 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Happy Friday --we've had quite a week! Let's take a look at what happened: Support Apache –help offset the ASF's day-to-day operating expenses. Every dollar counts. - The Apache Software Foundation Receives Bitcoin Donation from Pineapple Fund Valued at $1M https://... ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Ne

GDPR and the right to be forgotten

Friday, January 19, 14:47 UTC @ John D. Cook

General Data Protection Regulation The European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) was adopted in 2016 and becomes enforceable in May of this year. Article 17 mandates a right to erasure, more commonly called the right to be forgotten. A right to be forgotten is tricky. It’s not immediately clear what this means or to what […]

An example escalation policy — CRE life lessons

Friday, January 19, 14:00 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Alex Bramley, Customer Reliability Engineer; Will Tipton, Site Reliability Engineer In an earlier blog post, we discussed the spectrum of engineering effort between reliability and feature development and the importance of describing when and how an organization should dedicate engineering time towards the reliability of a service

Random thoughts a Friday night in Ottawa

Friday, January 19, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

It’s January 19th, and I’m right now in Canada. It’s been a fascinating beginning of the year, starting with my onboarding at Shopify. I had forgotten how it feels to start a new job, with a lot of tools and processes to learn, and a lot of people to meet. It requires a lot of energy, and I tend to overwhelm, but I’m trying to take it easy this time, step by step. What excites me the most about joining this new company is that I’ll be able to dive deeper into how to make developers productive w

Our New Book: App Architecture (Early Access)

Friday, January 19, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

“Most writing about app architecture tries to sell you on a specific solution. We believe almost any architecture can work well, if applied correctly.” — Chris Eidhof Today, we’re pleased to announce early access to our new book: 📗

Wearable Challenges

Thursday, January 18, 22:50 UTC @ joe cieplinski

Well, it’s finally come to this. After more than a year of walking around New York with my AirPods, I finally gave in and bought these silicon hooks from EarBuddyz to keep the darn things from slipping out of optimal sound position, or worse,

Which Shore is the Right Shore? Onshore, Offshore or Nearshore Outsourcing?

Thursday, January 18, 21:21 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

There are lots of reasons to consider outsourcing software development projects. One is the shortage of talent in the United States. A booming economy, combined with a shortage of highly skilled web developers have created a tight labor market. Outsourced software development has not only become a necessity for keeping projects on track – but […] The post Which Shore is the Right

A Sensitive Game

Thursday, January 18, 17:47 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Last month I posted about the sensitivity conjecture and today I would like to talk about an interesting game developed by Gilmer, Koucký and Saks and independently by Drucker that could yield a proof. Consider the following game on n bits among three players, Alice, Bob and Carol. The game works as follows: Carol pi

New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe, and more news from TED speakers

Thursday, January 18, 16:14 UTC @ TED Blog

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe. KIC 8462852 (often called “Tabby’s star,” after the astronomer Tabetha Boyajian, who led the first study of the star) intermittently dims as much as 22% and then brightens again, […

A Founder’s Thoughts On Selling His Business | Hangout with Jason Eckenroth (Founder, ShipCompliant)

Thursday, January 18, 14:37 UTC @ Business of Software USA

3am in the morning – 5 hours to close. I felt the weight of 17 years of building a business all come down to this moment where I’d lost absolute, complete confidence that I was gonna make the right decision. Walking away from something I’d built for 17 years. It was my life. And I had […] The post A Founder’s Thoughts On Sellin

The Apache® Software Foundation Receives Bitcoin Donation from Pineapple Fund Valued at $1M

Thursday, January 18, 14:30 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Charitable donation helps underwrite the world's largest Open Source foundation, benefiting billions of users who depend on Apache's freely-available Open Source community-driven software. Forest Hill, MD —18 January 2018— The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today that it has received a 88.34 Bitcoin (BTC) donat

White paper: Embark on a journey from monoliths to microservices

Thursday, January 18, 14:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Bryan Nairn, Product Marketing Manager Today we introduced the next in a series of white papers about migration entitled “Taking the Cloud-Native Approach with Microservices.” This paper switches gears from “lift-and-shift,” and introduces the idea of “move-and-improve.” If you missed the first white paper, you can read the

Most useful math class

Thursday, January 18, 13:43 UTC @ John D. Cook

A few years ago someone asked me what was my most useful undergraduate math class. My first thought was topology. I have never directly applied topology for a client. Nobody has ever approached me wanting to know, for example, whether two objects were in the same homotopy class. But I believe topology was one of […]

Human First, Everything Else Comes After | Dana Denis-Smith, Obelisk Support | BoS Europe 2017

Thursday, January 18, 10:21 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Dana Denis-Smith, Founder, Obelisk Support Consciously bootstrapped from day one, Dana focused early effort on building a community and creating a product that meets a market need. Early customers and clients were managed on spreadsheets, then a relatively primitive, off the shelf CRM system. She realised the critical piece in making the business successful was […] The post

Evergreen Diary #6: Proposed Sync Design

Thursday, January 18, 05:02 UTC @ inessential.com

Most of the time, a user will do a thing — mark some articles as read, for instance — and then Evergreen will tell the server (Feedbin, Feedly, etc.) right away. That’s good and easy. The hard part is this: what happens when the server is not reachable for some reason? Continuing the example: Evergreen could, in the case of the unreachable server, refuse to mark those articles as read. It could insist tha

Beyond Falsifiability

Thursday, January 18, 00:24 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Sean Carroll has a new paper out defending the Multiverse and attacking the naive Popperazi, entitled Beyond Falsifiability: Normal Science in a Multiverse. He also has a Beyond Falsifiability blog post here. Much of the problem with the paper and … Continue reading →

The Quantum Spy

Wednesday, January 17, 19:23 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I don’t often read spy thrillers, but just finished one, The Quantum Spy, by David Ignatius. Ignatius is a well-known journalist at the Washington Post, specializing in international affairs and the intelligence community (and known to some as The Mainstream … Continue reading →

The Omni Show #6 with Liz Marley

Wednesday, January 17, 17:05 UTC @ inessential.com

This episode features Liz Marley, OmniGraffle engineer, formerly a tester and PM. She talks about switching from testing to writing code — and about how she came to do technical talks using Swift playgrounds. Playgrounds with ducks, that is, because every good playground has ducks.

Analyzing your BigQuery usage with Ocado Technology’s GCP Census

Wednesday, January 17, 17:01 UTC @ Google Cloud Platform Blog

By Marcin Kołda, Senior Software Engineer at Ocado Technology [Editor’s note: Today we hear from Google Cloud customer Ocado Technology, which created (and open sourced!) a program to give them at-a-glance insights about their data warehouse usage, by reading BigQuery metadata. Read on to learn about how they architected the tool, what kinds of questions it can answer

Beyond Falsifiability

Wednesday, January 17, 16:44 UTC @ Sean Carroll

I have a backlog of fun papers that I haven’t yet talked about on the blog, so I’m going to try to work through them in reverse chronological order. I just came out with a philosophically-oriented paper on the thorny … Continue reading →

Pure Nerd Fun: The Grasshopper Problem

Wednesday, January 17, 13:26 UTC @ Backreaction

illustration of grasshopper.[image: awesomedude.com] It’s a sunny afternoon in July and a grasshopper lands on your lawn. The lawn has an area of a square meter. The grasshopper lands at a random place and then jumps 30 centimeters. Which shape must the lawn have so that the grasshopper is most likely to land on the lawn again after jumping? I know, sounds like one of these contrived but

Pure Nerd Fun: The Grasshopper Problem

Wednesday, January 17, 13:26 UTC @ Backreaction

illustration of grasshopper.[image: awesomedude.com] It’s a sunny afternoon in July and a grasshopper lands on your lawn. The lawn has an area of a square meter. The grasshopper lands at a random place and then jumps 30 centimeters. Which shape must the lawn have so that the grasshopper is most likely to land on the lawn again after jumping? I know, sounds like one of these contrived but

TED debuts “Small Thing Big Idea” original video series on Facebook Watch

Tuesday, January 16, 18:43 UTC @ TED Blog

Today we’re debuting a new original video series on Facebook Watch called Small Thing Big Idea: Designs That Changed the World. Each 3- to 4-minute weekly episode takes a brief but delightful look at the lasting genius of one everyday object – a pencil, for example, or a hoodie – and explains how it is so perfectly […]

Book Review: “The Dialogues” by Clifford Johnson

Tuesday, January 16, 16:56 UTC @ Backreaction

Clifford Johnson is a veteran of the science blogosphere, a long-term survivor, around already when I began blogging and one of the few still at it today. He is professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California (in LA). I had the pleasure of meeting Clifford in 2007. Who’d have thought back then that 10 years later we would both be in the midst of

Book Review: “The Dialogues” by Clifford Johnson

Tuesday, January 16, 16:56 UTC @ Backreaction

Clifford Johnson is a veteran of the science blogosphere, a long-term survivor, around already when I began blogging and one of the few still at it today. He is professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California (in LA). I had the pleasure of meeting Clifford in 2007. Who’d have thought back then that 10 years later we would both be in the midst of

Donald Knuth Turns 80 years and 6 days

Tuesday, January 16, 16:41 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Celebrating Donald Knuth's 80th birthday, or 80 years + 7 days birthday seems odd. Should we use powers of 2? Hmm- too few, just 32 and 64 really. And having a 32-year celebration for someone is unusual. How about numbers that end in 0 in base 8. 64 would be 100, 72 would 110, 80 would be 120 so AH- we would be celebrating! So lets Celebrate! LANCE: One of us should blog about Don Knuth turning 80. BILL: How about both of us, sep posts? Lance had his post

Bliki: IntegrationTest

Tuesday, January 16, 14:38 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Integration tests determine if independently developed units of software work correctly when they are connected to each other. The term has become blurred even by the diffuse standards of the software industry, so I've been wary of using it in my writing. In particular, many people assume integration tests are necessarily broad in scope, while they can be more effectively done with a narrower scope. As often with these things, it's best to start with a bit of history. When I first learned about in

Adding a toggle Extension on Bool

Tuesday, January 16, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

For Bool variables, it is common to want to toggle the state of the variable. In larger (nested) structs, the duplication involved can become especially annoying: myVar.prop1.prop2.enabled = !myVar.prop1.prop2.enabled It’s also easy to make a mistake in the code above if there are multiple Bool vars. You can solve this problem by adding a method toggle on Bool: exten

Evergreen Diary #5: Send to MarsEdit

Monday, January 15, 22:26 UTC @ inessential.com

The latest build of Evergreen, fresh from the lab, now adds MarsEdit to the sharing menu in the toolbar. When you choose the command, it sends the current article to MarsEdit — which opens it in a new window, and then you can edit and add your own commentary before posting to your blog. * * * See

Product review policies

Monday, January 15, 21:50 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ve often reviewed books on this site and may review other products some day. I wanted to let readers and potential vendors know what my policies are regarding product reviews. I don’t get paid for reviews. I review things that I find interesting and think that readers would find interesting. I don’t do reviews with […]

Evergreen Diary #4: Send to Micro.blog

Monday, January 15, 17:35 UTC @ inessential.com

The latest build of Evergreen adds Micro.blog to the Share menu in the toolbar, if you have the Micro.blog Mac app. It sends the title and link of whatever you’re reading over to the Micro.blog Mac app, and you can edit it before actually posting. This is hugely important. RSS readers exist not to just make reading easy but to make the web a conversation. The next releas

Advancing cloud with memory disaggregation

Monday, January 15, 01:53 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Here at IBM Research – Ireland, we are rethinking the very foundations on which the cloud is built. We are developing a concept and prototype for low-power and high-utilization disaggregated cloud data centres that break known boundaries, enabling the dynamic creation of fit-for-purpose computing environments from a pool of disaggregated resources. Today’s cloud data centres […] The post

Adventures in Fine Hall

Sunday, January 14, 22:47 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Every so often I get a copy of Princeton’s alumni publication in the mail, which I mostly ignore. The latest one however had an entertaining article about the Princeton mathematics department during the 1930s, entitled Adventures in Fine Hall. Various … Continue reading →

Retrotransposons

Sunday, January 14, 18:28 UTC @ Azimuth

This article is very interesting: • Ed Yong, Brain cells share information with virus-like capsules, Atlantic, January 12, 2018. Your brain needs a protein called Arc. If you have trouble making this protein, you’ll have trouble forming new memories. The neuroscientist Jason Shepherd noticed something weird: He saw that these Arc proteins assemble into hollow, […]

Fix string.format("%c", 0).

Sunday, January 14, 13:11 UTC @ Recent commits to luajit-2.0

Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professors, students and developers

Sunday, January 14, 05:47 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Submissions for the IBM Q Prizes are now open: IBM Q Awards website. Whether its PCs, smartphones or quantum computers, one fact remains consistent: the recipe for success relies heavily on building an engaged and thriving ecosystem. For example, on 12 August 1981 when IBM introduced the IBM 5150 (eventually called the IBM PC) at […] The post Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professo

Timing Leaks Everything

Saturday, January 13, 04:30 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Facing the awful truth that computers are physical machines As moderator of RSA 2016 panel Paul Kocher is the lead author on the second of two papers detailing a longstanding class of security vulnerability that was recognized only recently. He is an author on the first paper. Both papers credit his CRYPTO 1996 paper as […]

Interactive Line Editing in .NET

Friday, January 12, 20:04 UTC @ Miguel de Icaza

Even these days, I still spend too much time on the command line. My friends still make fun of my MacOS desktop when they see that I run a full screen terminal, and the main program that I am running there is the Midnight Commander: Every once in a while I write an interactive application, and I want to have full bash-like command line

How AI can help enterprise workers automatically triage conversations

Friday, January 12, 19:55 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Knowledge workers spend an average of 28 hours in a typical work week on email and messaging, conversations and collaboration. Much of these communications are centered around getting organized and getting work done — define actions or tasks, make requests and commitments of each other, and exchange updates on the status of the work in progress. However, information overload remains a […] The post

Flipping Wyoming

Friday, January 12, 15:29 UTC @ bit-player

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 12 January 2018

Friday, January 12, 14:24 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Wow: it's Friday already! Let's review what happened over the past week: ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 17 January. Board calendar and minutes http://... ASF Infrastructure –our distributed team on three continents keeps the ASF's in

Scaling SaaS Marketing | Hangout with Andrus Purde

Friday, January 12, 14:15 UTC @ Business of Software USA

The First BoS Hangout of 2018 was with Andrus Purde, founder of Outfunnel and ex-Head of Marketing at Pipedrive. As Head of Marketing, Andrus Purde saw Pipedrive grow from a small startup to over 50,000 customers. Hear his insight in running a marketing team through that transition in this very interesting Q&A. Andrus talks about […] The post Scaling SaaS Marketing | Hangout with A

Mentions: Proof-of-Concept

Thursday, January 11, 21:13 UTC @ inessential.com

Ben Curtis posted feed_searcher to GitHub — it creates custom search feeds, and even has a handy Deploy to Heroku button. Cool. (This is in reference to App Idea: Mentions).

App Idea: Inside Story

Thursday, January 11, 21:09 UTC @ inessential.com

I had this idea around the time Apple came out with Bonjour (née Rendezvous), and all these years later I realize I’m never going to get around to it. Here’s the scoop: The idea is microblog posts (tweet-like) but that live inside a specific network only. You run a Mac app that: Lets you post short messages. Shows short messages from people inside your network. The app runs a small webserver that’s discoverable via Bonjour, that has a

App Store Upload Failures

Thursday, January 11, 13:32 UTC @ Indie Stack

I’ve been running into failures to connect to iTunes Connect through Application Loader. Others corroborate similar problems uploading through Xcode. The nut of the problem comes down to a failure to authenticate a specific Apple ID. The failure string is “Unable to process authenticateWithArguments request at this time due to a general error”: Whatever is … Continue reading

Average fraction round up

Thursday, January 11, 03:23 UTC @ John D. Cook

Pick a large number n. Divide n by each of the positive integers up to n and round the results up to the nearest integer. On average, how far do you round up? Or in terms of probability, what is the expected distance between a fraction n/r, where n is large and fixed and r is chosen randomly […]

Why Oprah’s talk works: Insight from a TED speaker coach

Wednesday, January 10, 19:26 UTC @ TED Blog

By Abigail Tenembaum and Michael Weitz of Virtuozo When Oprah Winfrey spoke at the Golden Globes last Sunday night, her speech lit up social media within minutes. It was powerful, memorable and somehow exactly what the world wanted to hear. It inspired multiple standing O’s — and even a semi-serious Twitter campaign to elect her […]

Donald Knuth Turns Eighty

Wednesday, January 10, 13:26 UTC @ Computational Complexity

We've kept this blog going long enough that we start repeating our celebrations. Ten years ago Bill celebrated Don Knuth's 70th Birthday and today Donald Knuth turns 80. While he celebrates in Piteå, Sweden with its less than 4.5 hours of daylight, we wish him a happy birthday from stateside. Looking back in this blog, in 2015 I wrote abou

Six blog posts on the mathematics of privacy

Wednesday, January 10, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Six blog posts on mathematics and privacy: Randomized response and Bayes’ theorem Big aggregate queries can still violate privacy  Quantifying privacy loss Database anonymization for testing Toxic pairs and re-identification Adding Laplacian or Gaussian noise to a database

Superfluid dark matter gets seriously into business

Wednesday, January 10, 12:54 UTC @ Backreaction

very dark fluid Most matter in the universe isn’t like the stuff we are made of. Instead, it’s a thinly distributed, cold, medium which rarely interacts both with itself and with other kinds of matter. It also doesn’t emit light, which is why physicists refer to it as “dark matter.” A recently proposed idea, according to which dark matter may be superfluid, has now become more concrete,

Superfluid dark matter gets seriously into business

Wednesday, January 10, 12:54 UTC @ Backreaction

very dark fluid Most matter in the universe isn’t like the stuff we are made of. Instead, it’s a thinly distributed, cold, medium which rarely interacts both with itself and with other kinds of matter. It also doesn’t emit light, which is why physicists refer to it as “dark matter.” A recently proposed idea, according to which dark matter may be superfluid, has now become more concrete,

IBM Fellow Awarded Levchin Prize for Contributions to Cryptography

Wednesday, January 10, 11:03 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

We can all thank an elementary school teacher for keeping our electronic data safe and secure. Growing up in Argentina, and studying in Israel, not far from where his career started at IBM’s Haifa Lab, IBM Fellow and cryptographer, Hugo M. Krawczyk cites his third-grade teacher as one of his first influences. “She piqued my […] The post IBM Fellow Awarde

The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Trafodion™ as a Top-Level Project

Wednesday, January 10, 11:00 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Mature Big Data database management system for working in SQL at Apache Hadoop-scale levels in use China Mobile, China Unicom, Dell EMC, Esgyn Corporation, and Millersoft Limited, among others. Forest Hill, MD —10 January 2018— The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today that Apache® Trafodion

App Idea: Mentions

Tuesday, January 09, 21:33 UTC @ inessential.com

“Hold on — I need to check my Mentions.” Ten years ago or more we had several blog-specific search engines and services: Technorati, BlogBridge, and others. One of the great things about these services was not just being able to search for something but being able to set up persistent searches: that is, you’d get a search as an RSS feed, and in your feed reader you’d get results from all over the place on the thing you’re searching for. In the obvious and comm

Various News

Tuesday, January 09, 21:15 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Now back from vacation in a much warmer location than New York. Some things I noticed while away: I see that Paris has a bid to host the 2022 ICM. Everyone should strongly support this, one can’t have too many … Continue reading →

Whither the DBA

Tuesday, January 09, 21:07 UTC @ tecosystems

It should not be controversial to say that the way software is written in 2018 is materially different than in 2008, let alone 1998. Not just in terms of the underlying technologies, which have inevitably evolved and been refined, but the associated processes and methodologies. Whether driven by the introduction of transformative technologies ranging from

Whither the DBA

Tuesday, January 09, 21:07 UTC @ tecosystems

It should not be controversial to say that the way software is written in 2018 is materially different than in 2008, let alone 1998. Not just in terms of the underlying technologies, which have inevitably evolved and been refined, but the associated processes and methodologies. Whether driven by the introduction of transformative technologies ranging from

Meet the 2018 class of TED Fellows and Senior Fellows

Tuesday, January 09, 16:03 UTC @ TED Blog

The TED Fellows program is excited to announce the new group of TED2018 Fellows and Senior Fellows. Representing a wide range of disciplines and countries — including, for the first time in the program, Syria, Thailand and Ukraine — this year’s TED Fellows are rising stars in their fields, each with a bold, original approach […]

My Crazy Plans for the New Year (Book Teaser)

Tuesday, January 09, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

Happy new year! It seems like good time for a Quality Coding retrospective. I also want to share some goals for 2018. …Did someone say, “Are you writing a book?” Subscribers In 2017, Quality Coding crossed over 2,000 subscribers! (Are you one of them? All subscribers get my test-focused code snippets.) …Crossing the 2,000 threshold […]

Double blind review at theory conferences: More thoughts.

Tuesday, January 09, 07:41 UTC @ The Geomblog

I've had a number of discussions with people both before and after the report that Rasmus and I wrote on the double-blind experiment at ALENEX. And I think it's helpful to lay out some of my thoughts on both the purpose of double blind review as I understand it, and the logistical challenges of implementing it. What is the purpose of double blind review? The goal is to mitigate the effects of the unconscious, implicit biases that we all possess and that influence our dec

Me, elsewhere

Tuesday, January 09, 07:14 UTC @ Backreaction

Beginning 2018, I will no longer write for Ethan Siegel’s Forbes collection “Starts With a Bang.” Instead, I will write a semi-regular column for Quanta Magazine, the first of which -- about asymptotically safe gravity -- appeared yesterday. In contrast to Forbes, Quanta Magazine keeps the copyright, which means that the articles I write for them will not be mirrored on this blog. You

Me, elsewhere

Tuesday, January 09, 07:14 UTC @ Backreaction

Beginning 2018, I will no longer write for Ethan Siegel’s Forbes collection “Starts With a Bang.” Instead, I will write a semi-regular column for Quanta Magazine, the first of which -- about asymptotically safe gravity -- appeared yesterday. In contrast to Forbes, Quanta Magazine keeps the copyright, which means that the articles I write for them will not be mirrored on this blog. You

Ten years of blogging

Tuesday, January 09, 03:47 UTC @ John D. Cook

Ten years ago I started writing this blog. Since then I’ve written about 2700 posts. Thank you all for reading, commenting, and sharing. Update: For highlights of my posts over the years, see Tim Hopper’s post John Cook’s Ten Year Blogging Endeavour.

A Functional Interface for Imperative Code

Tuesday, January 09, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

In last week’s Swift Talk episode, Refactoring Imperative Layout Code, we refactored an imperative flow layout algorithm into an algorithm with a functional interface. In this article, we’ll implement a justified version of this flow layout. Thanks to the functional interface, we can plug it in by changing a single line of code. With no implicit state, the interface makes it easy to swap out implementations,

Intrinsic String Encoding

Monday, January 08, 19:50 UTC @ Indie Stack

I was baffled today while investigating a bug in MarsEdit, which a customer reported as only seeming to affect the app when writing in Japanese. I pasted some Japanese text into the app and was able to reproduce the bug easily. What really confused me, though was that the bug persisted even after I replaced … Continue reading Intrinsic String Encoding U

Improving Link Time on Windows with clang-cl and lld

Monday, January 08, 18:06 UTC @ Planet Clang

One of our goals in bringing clang and lld to Windows has always been to improve developer experience, and what is it that developers want the most?  Faster build times!  Recently, our focus has been on improving link time because it's the step that's the hardest to parallelize so we can't fall back on the time honored tradition of throwing more cores at it.Of the various steps involved in linking, generating the debug info (which, on Windows, is a PDB file) is by far the slowest since it involves merging

Monitoring in a DevOps World

Monday, January 08, 16:05 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Monitoring can seem quite overwhelming. The most important thing to remember is that perfect should never be the enemy of better. DevOps enables highly iterative improvement within organizations. If you have no monitoring, get something; get anything. Something is better than nothing, and if you've embraced DevOps, you've already signed up for making it better over time.

Swift Non-Nil Values In An Array Of Optionals

Monday, January 08, 13:30 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

I find it hard to remember the different ways you can use case with Swift beyond the familiar switch. Here is one useful example for when you need to do something with the non-nil values in an array of optionals. Here is the situation. I have an array of String items some of which can be nil. let names = ["Tom", nil, "Fred"] The type of names is [String?] - an array of o

Conditional Conformance in the Standard Library

Monday, January 08, 12:00 UTC @ Swift.org

The Swift 4.1 compiler brings the next phase of improvements from the roadmap for generics: conditional conformances. This post will look at how this much-anticipated feature has been adopted in Swift’s standard library, and how it affects you and your code. Equatable Cont

A new largest prime found!

Monday, January 08, 02:21 UTC @ Computational Complexity

A new largest KNOWN prime has been discovered and its 23 million digits long. Nate Silver's website had an article about it (written by Oliver Roeder) here An article about why people do this is here Lance posted about finding large primes in 2006

How to prepare to work successfully with a software developer

Monday, January 08, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

When I have a first conversation with a new client, they are always eager to get underway. Naturally, you want the shortest development timeline possible. When you sign a contract for software development, you want to get your idea first to market or you have internal company deadlines to meet; both of which are very real business pressures. How should you prepare to get your development team off to a fast start and not stalled in the starting blocks? Project Purpose <

The Kepler Problem (Part 1)

Sunday, January 07, 23:00 UTC @ Azimuth

Johannes Kepler loved geometry, so of course he was fascinated by Platonic solids. His early work Mysterium Cosmographicum, written in 1596, includes pictures showing how the 5 Platonic solids correspond to the 5 elements: Five elements? Yes, besides earth, air, water and fire, he includes a fifth element that doesn’t feel the Earth’s gravitational pull: […]

Report on double blind reviewing in ALENEX 2018

Sunday, January 07, 20:54 UTC @ The Geomblog

+Rasmus Pagh and I chaired ALENEX 2018, and we decided to experiment with double blind review for the conference. What follows is a report that we wrote on our experiences doing this. There are some useful notes about logistics, especially in the context of a theoretically-organized conference on experimental algorithms.

Evergreen Diary #3: On Punting

Saturday, January 06, 21:10 UTC @ inessential.com

I have a vision for 1.0, and then, as time goes on, I have to cut it back beyond where it hurts. I have to keep punting. I hate this part of shipping software. But I also love it because it reminds me that I have the stomach for it. Shipping software is an emotional skill. After shipping — no matter what — there will be people who absolutely cannot believe that feature X wasn’t included. In fact, it’s the one thing they totally need. And they’re right. Not wrong. And I

Published in Science: IBM and Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers solve cancer immunotherapy mystery

Friday, January 05, 19:58 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Cancer immunotherapies, treatment approaches which harness a person’s own immune system to target and kill cancer cells, are currently a major driver in the development of new cancer treatments.  With the advent of next-generation gene editing technologies like CRISPR-Cas9, one could imagine a future in which cancer treatments are tailor-made not only for particular cancer […] The post

Do you have to manually unregister block-based NotificationCenter observers?

Friday, January 05, 18:10 UTC @ Ole Begemann

tl;dr: yes. (Tested on iOS 11.2.) A few weeks ago, I asked this question on Twitter: In iOS 11, is it still necessary to unregister block-based notification center observers? Apple docs are ambiguous: docs for addObserver(forName:object:queue:using:) say yes

What a difference a JVM makes?

Friday, January 05, 17:27 UTC @ Psychosomatic, Lobotomy, Saw

Which of these Math acronyms are well known?

Friday, January 05, 16:20 UTC @ Computational Complexity

The last time I taught Grad Ramsey Theory there were very good math grads and ugrads in it. They used some acronyms - some I knew, some I didn't know (but know now). I am sure some are well known and some are now. I don't know which is which. Here is the list and comments WLOG- Without Loss of Generality. This one I know and it seems well know-- When Googled the first page is all this definition. (Maybe I shouldn't use the term ``Googled''- I've heard that brand names don't l

The Apache News Round-up: week ending 5 January 2018

Friday, January 05, 15:46 UTC @ The Apache Software Foundation Blog

Welcome, 2018! We hope that you have had a festive holiday season and are excited to kick off the new year. Here's what happened over the past week: Apache in 2017 - By The Digits https://... ASF Board –management and oversight of the business affairs of the corporation in accordance with the Foundation's bylaws. - Next Board Meeting: 17 January. Board calendar and minutes

New prime on the block

Thursday, January 04, 16:55 UTC @ Terra Incognita

The GIMPS (Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search) has confirmed yesterday the new largest known prime number: 277,232,917-1. This new largest known prime has 23,249,425 digits and is, of course, a Mersenne prime, prime numbers expressed in the form of 2n – 1, where the primality can be efficiently calculated using Lucas-Lehmer primality test. One of...

New prime number record: 50th Mersenne prime

Thursday, January 04, 15:21 UTC @ John D. Cook

A new record for the largest known prime was announced yesterday: This number has 23,249,425 digits when written in base 10. In base 2, 2p – 1 is a sequence of p ones. For example, 31 = 25 -1  which is 11111 in binary. So in binary, the new record prime is a string of 77,232,917 […]

About the Meltdown and Spectre attacks

Thursday, January 04, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

About the Meltdown and Spectre attacks: FreeBSD was made aware of the problems in late December 2017. We're working with CPU vendors and the published papers on these attacks to mitigate them on FreeBSD. Due to the fundamental nature of the attacks, no estimate is yet available for the publication date of patches.

Vectometry is now part of Vecto

Wednesday, January 03, 23:22 UTC @ Zach Beane Common Lisp

I wrote vecto to be able to draw stuff to PNGs. It’s based on the PostScript/PDF drawing model, all the way down to the level of function arguments. To move to a point, you use (move-to x y). Curves are done with (curve-to x1 y1 x2 y2 x3 y3). Color calls are done with (set-rgb-fill r g b), etc. Each function argument that has multiple components is passed with the components separated. This is all right, I gue

Apple Developer Program Membership Fee Waivers Now Available

Wednesday, January 03, 18:00 UTC @ News - Apple Developer

We’re pleased to announce that Apple Developer Program membership is now available at no cost for eligible organizations. Nonprofit organizations, accredited educational institutions, and government entities based in the United States that will distribute only free apps on the App Store can request to have their annual membership fee waived.Learn more about membership fee waivers.

The Omni Show #5 with Mark Boszko

Wednesday, January 03, 16:40 UTC @ inessential.com

In this episode I finally get around to talking to Mark Boszko, the show’s intrepid producer and The Omni Group’s Video Producer. I’ve known Mark for more than ten years — we met at a SXSW conference many years ago, long before either of us came to Omni. Mark didn’t even live in Seattle in those days. Now he does, and now we have the pleasure of working together on a podcast. PS If you li

2018: Some Hope

Wednesday, January 03, 14:29 UTC @ inessential.com

Mike Monteiro writes of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: Jack let it happen. He watched as a once-entertaining, once-illuminating, once-vital network to global communication became a garbage fire of hate. He did nothing to stop it. Or curb it. He didn’t see a problem. Our current crises of democracy and good faith did not just blow in with the wind and transform the air wi

Sometimes I believe in string theory. Then I wake up.

Wednesday, January 03, 14:11 UTC @ Backreaction

They talk about me. Grumpy Rainbow Unicorn.[Image Source.] And I can’t blame them. Because nothing else is happening on this planet. There’s just me and my attempt to convince physicists that beauty isn’t truth. Yes, I know it’s not much of an insight that pretty ideas aren’t always correct. That’s why I objected when my editor suggested I title my book “Why Beauty isn’t Truth.” Because,

Sometimes I believe in string theory. Then I wake up.

Wednesday, January 03, 14:11 UTC @ Backreaction

They talk about me. Grumpy Rainbow Unicorn.[Image Source.] And I can’t blame them. Because nothing else is happening on this planet. There’s just me and my attempt to convince physicists that beauty isn’t truth. Yes, I know it’s not much of an insight that pretty ideas aren’t always correct. That’s why I objected when my editor suggested I title my book “Why Beauty isn’t Truth.” Because,

Predictions We Didn’t Make

Wednesday, January 03, 04:59 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

With wishes for a memorable New Year 2018 Muhammad Afzal Upal is Chair of the Computing and Information Science Department at Mercyhurst University. He works in machine learning and cognitive science, most specifically making inferences from textual data. In joint papers he has refined a quantitative approach to the idea of postdiction originally suggested by […]

The Engineer’s Nyquist frequency and the sampling theorem

Wednesday, January 03, 02:15 UTC @ John D. Cook

The Nyquist sampling theorem says that a band-limited signal can be recovered from evenly-spaced samples. If the highest frequency component of the signal is fc then the function needs to be sampled at a frequency of at least the Nyquist frequency 2fc. Or to put it another way, the spacing between samples needs to be […]

Compiling a Subset of APL Into a Typed Intermediate Language

Wednesday, January 03, 00:13 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Compiling a Subset of APL Into a Typed Intermediate Language by Martin Elsman, Martin Dybdal Traditionally, APL is an interpreted language ... In this paper, we present a compiler that compiles a subset of APL into a typed intermediate representation, which should serve as a practical and well-defined intermediate format for targeting parallel-architectures through a large number of existing tools and frameworks. The intermediate l

Looking Back, Looking Forward

Tuesday, January 02, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Happy New Year! Looking back, 2017 was a great year for Swift. With Swift 4, we got key paths, Codable, multiline string literals, and much more. The community has been awesome too: we saw a number of promising new libraries, a rich variety of conference talks, and perhaps best of all, new voices joining the Swift community from all kinds of backgrounds. It was also a productive year

Clear and Verifiable

Monday, January 01, 21:57 UTC @ joe cieplinski

The way in which Aaron Sorkin describes Intention and Obstacle in the early bits of his Masterclass is so simple, so easy to comprehend, and most importantly, so easy to test [1]. In just a few minutes, he offers a simple way to detect whether there is an appropriate level

The call for papers formerly known as ICFP

Monday, January 01, 01:45 UTC @ composition.al

2018 will be my third and final year serving as the publicity chair for ICFP, the International Conference on Functional Programming. So, not too long ago, I sent out the call for papers for PACMPL issue ICFP 2018. Wait, what? Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, or PACMPL, is the ACM’s new open-acc