Alpaca – Functional programming inspired by ML for the Erlang VM

Saturday, March 25, 06:16 UTC @ Lobsters

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The Night Watch (James Mickens on systems programming)

Saturday, March 25, 04:13 UTC @ Lobsters

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Apache CarbonData: An Indexed Columnar Format for HDFS

Saturday, March 25, 02:35 UTC @ Lobsters

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Black Screen on a Red iPhone 7

Saturday, March 25, 00:54 UTC @ Daring Fireball

I’m 100 percent convinced this looks better than the white bezel. ★

‘Hello, Bob’

Saturday, March 25, 00:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Washington Post reporter Robert Costa: President Trump called me on my cellphone Friday afternoon at 3:31 p.m. At first I thought it was a reader with a complaint since it was a blocked number. Instead, it was the president calling from the Oval Office. His voice was even, his tone muted. He did not bury the lead. “Hello, Bob,” Trump began. “So, we just pulled it.” At a meta level, it’s fascinating to me that Trump made these phone call

How and why to learn about data structures

Saturday, March 25, 00:28 UTC @ Lobsters

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‘Repeal and Replace’ Claim Chowder

Saturday, March 25, 00:22 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Philip Bump, reporting for The Washington Post: “I never said I was going to repeal and replace in the first 61 days,” he said to Costa with a laugh — undercounting his time in office by a bit. When he offered a public statement a bit later, he’d figured out the proper number. […] Trump is correct: At no point in time did he pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare in 61 or 64 days. Instead, he pledged to demand a repeal on Day One — even if it took a spec

Cross-platform GUI Toolkit Trainwreck, 2016 Edition (2016)

Saturday, March 25, 00:15 UTC @ Lobsters

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Probabilistic Programming Summer School 2017

Friday, March 24, 23:26 UTC @ Lobsters

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How Paul Ryan Played Donald Trump

Friday, March 24, 22:55 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ezra Klein, writing for Vox: Donald Trump promised to be a different kind of president. He was a populist fighting on behalf of the “forgotten man,” taking on the GOP establishment, draining the Washington swamp, protecting Medicaid from cuts, vowing to cover everyone with health care and make the government pay for it. He was a pragmatic businessman who was going to make Washington work for you, the little guy, not the ideologues and special interests. Instead, Trump has b

The Saddest Moment (James Mickens)

Friday, March 24, 22:53 UTC @ Lobsters

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‘Pass the Heinz’

Friday, March 24, 22:37 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Brilliant. Heinz is actually running ads from Don Draper’s rejected ketchup campaign from Mad Men: Fifty years ago, in the fictional world of Mad Men, Don Draper pitched a daring ad campaign to Heinz execs, for the brand’s ketchup, that proposed not showing the product at all. Instead, the ads would show close-ups of foods that go great with ketchup — french fries, a cheeseburger, a slice of steak — but without any ketchup in sight. Don’s proposed

A Derivation of Conway's Degree-71 "Look-and-Say" Polynomial

Friday, March 24, 22:26 UTC @ Lobsters

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FedEx Offers Customers $5 for the Inconvenience of Requiring Adobe Flash

Friday, March 24, 22:01 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ina Fried, writing for Axios: Adobe Flash has been on the ropes since Steve Jobs went on his famous tirade 7 years ago, but that doesn’t mean some sites don’t still require it. For its part, FedEx is apologizing to customers and offering $5 discount for the fact that printing labels online still requires the browser plug-in. F

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin Has a Shitty Radar

Friday, March 24, 21:52 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Kim Hart, Axios: Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin riled the tech community this morning when he told Axios’s Mike Allen that displacement of jobs by artificial intelligence and automation is “not even on my radar screen” because the technology is “50-100 more years” away. Mnuchin also said he is “not worried at all” about robots di

A new civic gathering, awarding disobedience, and the case for resettlement

Friday, March 24, 21:46 UTC @ TED Blog

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A new civic gathering. To cope with political anxiety after the 2016 elections, Eric Liu has started a gathering called Civic Saturday. He explained the event in The Atlantic as “a civic analogue to church: a gathering of friends […]

Podcast CB S&R 103: Materia oscura vs gravedad modificada

Friday, March 24, 19:34 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

He participado en el episodio 103 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Materia Oscura vs Alternativas: La Polémica; Ibuprofeno e Infartos; LHC; IA para salvar la Humanidad,” 23 Mar 2017. “La tertulia semanal ha repasado […] Leer más

Compile like it's 1992 (2014)

Friday, March 24, 19:27 UTC @ Lobsters

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The Zero Terminal (Portable Pi Zero W)

Friday, March 24, 18:02 UTC @ Lobsters

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HelenOS: Portable microkernel-based multiserver OS designed and implemented from scratch

Friday, March 24, 17:56 UTC @ Lobsters

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Judge Tells FAA Rep: "You're Just Making Stuff Up."

Friday, March 24, 16:43 UTC @ Lobsters

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Free, Open Source PGAdmin replacement Postage has a huge release today!

Friday, March 24, 14:17 UTC @ Lobsters

Two releases in one day! We finally put out a huge release, 3.2.0, the release notes were extensive, only to realize almost immediately that Electron had a caching issue. And this after testing on like eight different OSes! Unfortunately, they were all virtual machines with clean installs and the caching issue wouldn’t have shown itself on those. Long story short, 3.2.1 is out! Please give it a try and report any issues. Special thanks to stevenwinfield who reported about a dozen bugs which w

How big was the Universe at the moment of its creation? (Synopsis)

Friday, March 24, 14:06 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.” -Carl Jung 13.8 billion years ago, the Universe as we know it came into existence. Today, the part we can observe is 46 billion light years…

Non-caching proxy for removing ads and other obnoxious Internet junk

Friday, March 24, 13:30 UTC @ Lobsters

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Man Puts Computer Through Hell By Installing Every Major Windows Upgrade

Friday, March 24, 12:33 UTC @ Lobsters

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Mobile Computing Research Is a Hornet’s Nest of Deception and Chicanery (James Mickens)

Friday, March 24, 12:22 UTC @ Lobsters

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/u/tomaka17 on /r/cpp discusses Rust

Friday, March 24, 12:02 UTC @ gilded : rust

From the top of my head: The biggest is probably the fact that it's impossible to safely put a borrowee and a borrower in the same struct. This has very deep consequences on API design. I'm glad this problem has been encountered in the RFC about generators, because now language designers are realizing that it is a real problem. (EDIT: I know you can use that trick with RefCell, no it's not a good solution and nobody has probably ever considered u

Hackers Stole My Website…And I Pulled Off A $30,000 Sting Operation To Get It Back

Friday, March 24, 12:00 UTC @ Lobsters

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Google takes Symantec to the woodshed for mis-issuing 30,000 HTTPS certs

Friday, March 24, 11:56 UTC @ Lobsters

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The code behind the story: Dissecting Trump's Most Rabid Online Following

Friday, March 24, 09:52 UTC @ Lobsters

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3.5 Years, 500k Lines of Go (Part 1)

Friday, March 24, 08:46 UTC @ Lobsters

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GCC licence change

Friday, March 24, 05:17 UTC @ Lobsters

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Tamil Bell

Friday, March 24, 05:00 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 323# Comments: 87

Minimum Cuts and Shortest Cycles in Directed Planar Graphs via Noncrossing Shortest Paths. (arXiv:1703.07964v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Let $G$ be an $n$-node simple directed planar graph with nonnegative edge weights. We study the fundamental problems of computing (1) a global cut of $G$ with minimum weight and (2) a~cycle of $G$ with minimum weight. The best previously known algorithm for the former problem, running in $O(n\log^3 n)$ time, can be obtained from the algorithm of \Lacki, Nussbaum, Sankowski, and Wulff-Nilsen for single-source all-sinks maximum flows. The best previously known result for the latter problem is the $O(n\log^

Distance-sensitive hashing. (arXiv:1703.07867v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We initiate the study of distance-sensitive hashing, a generalization of locality-sensitive hashing that seeks a family of hash functions such that the probability of two points having the same hash value is a given function of the distance between them. More precisely, given a distance space $(X, \text{dist})$ and a "collision probability function" (CPF) $f\colon \mathbb{R}\rightarrow [0,1]$ we seek a distribution over pairs of functions $(h,g)$ such that for every pair of points $x, y \in X$ the collis

Information complexity of the AND function in the two-Party, and multiparty settings. (arXiv:1703.07833v1 [cs.CC])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

In a recent breakthrough paper [M. Braverman, A. Garg, D. Pankratov, and O. Weinstein, From information to exact communication, STOC'13] Braverman et al. developed a local characterization for the zero-error information complexity in the two party model, and used it to compute the exact internal and external information complexity of the 2-bit AND function, which was then applied to determine the exact asymptotic of randomized communication complexity of the set disjointness problem. In this arti

A New Matching Algorithm for Multidimensional Persistence. (arXiv:1511.05427v3 [cs.CG] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

An algorithm is presented that constructs an acyclic partial matching on the cells of a given simplicial complex from a vector-valued function defined on the vertices and extended to each simplex by taking the least common upper bound of the values on its vertices. The resulting acyclic partial matching may be used to construct a reduced filtered complex with the same multidimensional persistent homology as the original simplicial complex filtered by the sublevel sets of the function. Numerical tests sho

Resolving the Complexity of Some Fundamental Problems in Computational Social Choice. (arXiv:1703.08041v1 [cs.DS])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

This thesis is in the area called computational social choice which is an intersection area of algorithms and social choice theory.

Quantum Communication-Query Tradeoffs. (arXiv:1703.07768v2 [cs.CC] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

For any function $f: X \times Y \to Z$, we prove that $Q^{*\text{cc}}(f) \cdot Q^{\text{OIP}}(f) \cdot (\log Q^{\text{OIP}}(f) + \log |Z|) \geq \Omega(\log |X|)$. Here, $Q^{*\text{cc}}(f)$ denotes the bounded-error communication complexity of $f$ using an entanglement-assisted two-way qubit channel, and $Q^{\text{OIP}}(f)$ denotes the number of quantum queries needed to determine $x$ with high probability given oracle access to the function $f_x(y) \stackrel{\text{def}}{=} f(x, y)$. We show that this tra

Graph sketching-based Massive Data Clustering. (arXiv:1703.02375v2 [cs.LG] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this paper, we address the problem of recovering arbitrary-shaped data clusters from massive datasets. We present DBMSTClu a new density-based non-parametric method working on a limited number of linear measurements i.e. a sketched version of the similarity graph $G$ between the $N$ objects to cluster. Unlike $k$-means, $k$-medians or $k$-medoids algorithms, it does not fail at distinguishing clusters with particular structures. No input parameter is needed contrarily to DBSCAN or the Spectral Cluster

Optimal lower bounds for universal relation, samplers, and finding duplicates. (arXiv:1703.08139v1 [cs.CC])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In the communication problem $\mathbf{UR}$ (universal relation) [KRW95], Alice and Bob respectively receive $x$ and $y$ in $\{0,1\}^n$ with the promise that $x\neq y$. The last player to receive a message must output an index $i$ such that $x_i\neq y_i$. We prove that the randomized one-way communication complexity of this problem in the public coin model is exactly $\Theta(\min\{n, \log(1/\delta)\log^2(\frac{n}{\log(1/\delta)})\})$ bits for failure probability $\delta$. Our lower bound holds even if pro

Classifying unavoidable Tverberg partitions. (arXiv:1611.01078v3 [cs.CG] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

Let $T(d,r) = (r-1)(d+1)+1$ be the parameter in Tverberg's theorem, and call a partition $\mathcal I$ of $\{1,2,\ldots,T(d,r)\}$ into $r$ parts a "Tverberg type". We say that $\mathcal I$ "occurs" in an ordered point sequence $P$ if $P$ contains a subsequence $P'$ of $T(d,r)$ points such that the partition of $P'$ that is order-isomorphic to $\mathcal I$ is a Tverberg partition. We say that $\mathcal I$ is "unavoidable" if it occurs in every sufficiently long point sequence. In this paper we stud

Width Hierarchies for Quantum and Classical Ordered Binary Decision Diagrams with Repeated Test. (arXiv:1703.07891v1 [cs.CC])

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

We consider quantum, nondterministic and probabilistic versions of known computational model Ordered Read-$k$-times Branching Programs or Ordered Binary Decision Diagrams with repeated test ($k$-QOBDD, $k$-NOBDD and $k$-POBDD). We show width hierarchy for complexity classes of Boolean function computed by these models and discuss relation between different variants of $k$-OBDD.

A roadmap for the computation of persistent homology. (arXiv:1506.08903v6 [math.AT] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

Persistent homology (PH) is a method used in topological data analysis (TDA) to study qualitative features of data that persist across multiple scales. It is robust to perturbations of input data, independent of dimensions and coordinates, and provides a compact representation of the qualitative features of the input. There has been recent progress, but the computation of PH remains an open area with numerous important and fascinating challenges. The field of PH computation is evolving rapidly, and new a

Generating realistic scaled complex networks. (arXiv:1609.02121v2 [cs.SI] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Research on generative models is a central project in the emerging field of network science, and it studies how statistical patterns found in real networks could be generated by formal rules. Output from these generative models is then the basis for designing and evaluating computational methods on networks, and for verification and simulation studies. During the last two decades, a variety of models has been proposed with an ultimate goal of achieving comprehensive realism for the generated networks. In

Collapsibility to a subcomplex of a given dimension is NP-complete. (arXiv:1703.06983v2 [cs.CG] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

In this paper we extend the works of Tancer and of Malgouyres and Franc\'es, showing that $(d,k)$-collapsibility is NP-complete for $d\geq k+2$ except $(2,0)$. By $(d,k)$-collapsibility we mean the following problem: determine whether a given $d$-dimensional simplicial complex can be collapsed to some $k$-dimensional subcomplex. The question of establishing the complexity status of $(d,k)$-collapsibility was asked by Tancer, who proved NP-completeness of $(d,0)$ and $(d,1)$-collapsibility (for $d\geq 3$)

Locally-orthogonal staggered unstructured grid-generation for general circulation modelling on the sphere. (arXiv:1611.08996v3 [physics.ao-ph] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

An algorithm for the generation of non-uniform, locally-orthogonal staggered unstructured spheroidal grids is described. This technique is designed to generate very high-quality staggered Voronoi/Delaunay meshes appropriate for general circulation modelling on the sphere, including applications to atmospheric simulation, ocean-modelling and numerical weather prediction. Using a recently developed Frontal-Delaunay refinement technique, a method for the construction of high-quality unstructured spheroidal

Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Requires Irrationality. (arXiv:1605.06848v2 [cs.CC] UPDATED)

Friday, March 24, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is the problem of decomposing a given nonnegative $n \times m$ matrix $M$ into a product of a nonnegative $n \times d$ matrix $W$ and a nonnegative $d \times m$ matrix $H$. A longstanding open question, posed by Cohen and Rothblum in 1993, is whether a rational matrix $M$ always has an NMF of minimal inner dimension $d$ whose factors $W$ and $H$ are also rational. We answer this question negatively, by exhibiting a matrix for which $W$ and $H$ require irrational ent

4-Year-Old Boy in U.K. Saved His Mother’s Life Using Siri

Friday, March 24, 01:12 UTC @ Daring Fireball

From the 999 transcript: Operator: Hello, this is the police. What is your emergency? Roman: Hello, I’m Roman. O: Where’s your mummy? R: She’s at home. O: Where are you? R: At home as well. O: Can you do me a favour? Can you go and get mummy? R: We can’t, she’s dead. O: You said mummy was there – what do you mean she’s dead? R: It means that she’s closing her eyes and she̵

Angular 4.0.0 Now Available

Friday, March 24, 00:55 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 265# Comments: 286

Dissecting Trump’s Most Rabid Online Following

Thursday, March 23, 23:50 UTC @ Lobsters

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Sea Ice Extent Sinks to Record Lows at Both Poles

Thursday, March 23, 23:50 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 208# Comments: 120

Swift Playgrounds 1.2 Now Available

Thursday, March 23, 22:30 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Swift Playgrounds, the revolutionary app for iPad that helps students learn to code, is now localized in Simplified Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Latin American Spanish, making it even easier for more students around the world to learn and experiment with code. Read the full press release.

Going native

Thursday, March 23, 22:01 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://...

Drug 'reverses' ageing in animal tests

Thursday, March 23, 20:37 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 213# Comments: 99

The Do’s and Don’ts of Developer Demos

Thursday, March 23, 20:25 UTC @ tecosystems

Long one of the staples of outbound marketing in the technology industry, it’s nevertheless striking how little thought often goes into a product demo. It’s understood that you need to have a demo, but who – precisely – it’s for and what you’re specifically trying to accomplish are afterthoughts, if they’re thought of at all.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Developer Demos

Thursday, March 23, 20:25 UTC @ tecosystems

Long one of the staples of outbound marketing in the technology industry, it’s nevertheless striking how little thought often goes into a product demo. It’s understood that you need to have a demo, but who – precisely – it’s for and what you’re specifically trying to accomplish are afterthoughts, if they’re thought of at all.

Show the User Journeys

Thursday, March 23, 19:55 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Next activity for Paulo's Lean Inception is to explore the journeys that users follow to reach their goals. The team plots out the steps of each journey on a large chart ready for the next activity.

Freudian hypothesis testing

Thursday, March 23, 19:54 UTC @ John D. Cook

In his paper Mindless statistics, Gerd Gigerenzer uses a Freudian analogy to describe the mental conflict researchers experience over statistical hypothesis testing. He says that the “statistical ritual” of NHST (null hypothesis significance testing) “is a form of conflict resolution, like compulsive hand washing.” In Gigerenzer’s analogy, the id represents Bayesian analysis. Deep down, a […]

Francis en LFDLC: Popurrí de noticias (programa 269)

Thursday, March 23, 18:16 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Ya puedes escuchar el podcast iVoox del Programa 269 de La Fábrica de la Ciencia, “Descripción de Recortes en NASA, el viaje espacial de Stephen Hawking y otras noticias NAUKAS con F. Villatoro”, en el que Jorge Onsulve Orellana, […] Leer más

US Senate votes to undo FCC internet privacy rules

Thursday, March 23, 18:04 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 947# Comments: 427

Senate votes to allow ISPs to collect personal data without permission

Thursday, March 23, 17:40 UTC @ Lobsters

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Thousands of underground gas bubbles poised to 'explode' in Arctic

Thursday, March 23, 17:29 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 561# Comments: 339

LastPass: Security done wrong

Thursday, March 23, 16:46 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 242# Comments: 200

A New Blast May Have Forged Cosmic Gold

Thursday, March 23, 16:30 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

For decades, researchers believed that violent supernovas forged gold and other heavy elements. But many now argue for a different cosmic quarry.

Intent to Deprecate and Remove: Trust in Existing Symantec-Issued Certificates

Thursday, March 23, 16:05 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 696# Comments: 295

VS Code uses 13% CPU when idle due to blinking cursor rendering

Thursday, March 23, 15:48 UTC @ Lobsters

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AWS IAM Policies in a Nutshell

Thursday, March 23, 15:43 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 206# Comments: 34

Modern JavaScript for Ancient Web Developers

Thursday, March 23, 15:12 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 581# Comments: 277

Cutting Science Funding Today Costs Us More Overall (Synopsis)

Thursday, March 23, 14:40 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.” -Carl Sagan The President of the United States just released his proposed budget for the next fiscal year, and there are some big losers in the scientific world. The EPA, the NIH,…

“Dig once” bill could bring fiber Internet to much of the US

Thursday, March 23, 14:22 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 455# Comments: 99

Loopy: a tool for thinking in systems

Thursday, March 23, 13:46 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 471# Comments: 82

Cognitive and Contextual Analytics for IT Services

Thursday, March 23, 12:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

 New Issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development Our ability to monitor and collect data about IT (information technology) services, ranging from cloud and hosted-IT delivery models to maintenance services, has grown to unprecedented levels over the past few years. Our latest issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development emphasizes new […] The post Cognitive and Contextual Ana

The Mathematics Autodidact’s Aid (2005) [pdf]

Thursday, March 23, 11:36 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 207# Comments: 45

The 64,000 Developer Questionnaire

Thursday, March 23, 10:48 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Stack Overflow’s annual developer survey is probably the most comprehensive overview of the development community. This year over 64,000 developers responded. If you want to understand, amongst other things, what developers are thinking, what motivates them, what they are looking for in a job and how they learn, this is a must read. Some things […] The post The 64,000 Developer Questionnaire

Japanese company develops a solar cell with record-breaking efficiency

Thursday, March 23, 09:59 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 442# Comments: 102

The Dagstuhl Family

Thursday, March 23, 09:16 UTC @ Computational Complexity

This week I'm at the Dagstuhl workshop on Computational Complexity of Discrete Problems. As you long time readers know Dagstuhl is a Germa

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working To Excess

Thursday, March 23, 07:23 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 316# Comments: 427

Pull Request Based Development Sucks

Thursday, March 23, 06:27 UTC @ Lobsters

Comments

Apple Acquires Workflow

Thursday, March 23, 03:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Whoa, huge news for iOS nerds. Matthew Panzarino has the scoop: Workflow has been around for a couple of years and we’ve covered it and its updates. It shares some similarity with the service IFTTT, in that it allows people to group together a bunch of actions that can allow them to perform complicated tasks with one tap. It had built up a sizeable number of users and downloads over the past few years. Workflow the app is being acquired, along with the team of Weinstein, Conr

Gizmodo: ‘Samsung’s New iPad Pro Is Just Fantastic’

Thursday, March 23, 01:07 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alex Cranz, Gizmodo: Coming a year after the launch of Apple’s first 9.7-inch iPad Pro, the new iteration from Samsung feels daring. While it has the same sleek lines, is just as light, and possesses the magnetic connection on one side for easy keyboard cover attachment, Samsung’s iPad Pro for 2017 is, inexplicably called the Galaxy Tab S3, and unlike previous iPads this one runs on Android. Samsung is so stupid with their insistence on printing their ugly log

The Talk Show: ‘Hubbo Is in Decline’

Thursday, March 23, 00:57 UTC @ Daring Fireball

New episode. Special guest Merlin Mann. Enjoy. Brought to you by: Eero: Finally, Wi-Fi, that works. Away: High quality luggage with built-in USB chargers. Save $20 with promo code talkshow. Fracture: Now through the end of March, save 20% on Fracture prints with promo code CLEAN. Order now for Mothers Day.

Secret colours of the Commodore 64

Wednesday, March 22, 22:26 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 385# Comments: 94

A static business is a healthy business

Wednesday, March 22, 21:58 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Academia is fucked-up. So why isn’t anyone doing something about it?

Wednesday, March 22, 17:58 UTC @ Backreaction

A week or so ago, a list of perverse incentives in academia made rounds. It offers examples like “rewarding an increased number of citations” that – instead of encouraging work of high quality and impact – results in inflated citation lists, an academic tit-for-tat which has become standard practice. Likewise, rewarding a high number of publications doesn’t produce more good science, but merely

Academia is fucked-up. So why isn’t anyone doing something about it?

Wednesday, March 22, 17:58 UTC @ Backreaction

A week or so ago, a list of perverse incentives in academia made rounds. It offers examples like “rewarding an increased number of citations” that – instead of encouraging work of high quality and impact – results in inflated citation lists, an academic tit-for-tat which has become standard practice. Likewise, rewarding a high number of publications doesn’t produce more good science, but merely

Healthcare research: IBM uncovers new way to stimulate the body to fight disease

Wednesday, March 22, 17:26 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Using nanomaterials to carry drug molecules to specific cells in the body is a relatively new field in healthcare research. But it’s an important one. For example, in order to target therapies to tumors, scientists have developed techniques to attach drug molecules (or vaccines) to nanomaterials like graphene sheets, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon that […] The post

There’s such a thing as “too helpful”

Wednesday, March 22, 16:42 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

The importance of sucking

Wednesday, March 22, 16:15 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Jobs to be done — Getting started

Wednesday, March 22, 16:10 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Can’t crack that programming problem? Go to sleep (or take a walk)

Wednesday, March 22, 14:26 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Golden powers are nearly integers

Wednesday, March 22, 14:04 UTC @ John D. Cook

This morning I was reading Terry Tao’s overview of the work of Yves Meyer and ran across this line: The powers φ, φ2, φ3, … of the golden ratio lie unexpectedly close to integers: for instance, φ11 = 199.005… is unusually close to 199. I’d never heard that before, so I wrote a little code […]

What will happen when Betelgeuse explodes? (Synopsis)

Wednesday, March 22, 14:03 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Without these supernova explosions, there are no mist-covered swamps, computer chips, trilobites, Mozart or the tears of a little girl. Without exploding stars, perhaps there could be a heaven, but there is certainly no Earth.” -Clifford A. Pickover One of the most sobering cosmic truths is that every star in the Universe will someday run…

[Sponsor] HealthFace for Apple Watch

Wednesday, March 22, 13:48 UTC @ Daring Fireball

This is the app that should have shipped with the Apple Watch. You can display any of your HealthKit data as a complication on any watch face, with hundreds of icons and many other options available. HealthFace is a once-off $1.99 purchase — and it’ll be your most-used Apple Watch app.

The Debugging Mindset

Wednesday, March 22, 13:04 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Software developers spend 35-50 percent of their time validating and debugging software. The cost of debugging, testing, and verification is estimated to account for 50-75 percent of the total budget of software development projects, amounting to more than $100 billion annually. While tools, languages, and environments have reduced the time spent on individual debugging tasks, they have not significantly reduced the total time spent debugging, nor the cost of doing so. Therefore, a hyperfocus on elimination

Technical and Business Review

Wednesday, March 22, 11:56 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Up early on Wednesday, so ready for the Technical and Business Review activity of Paulo's Lean Inception. During the morning the team reviews

Xcode 8.3 beta 5 (8E161) Now Available

Tuesday, March 21, 23:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Xcode 8.3 beta 5 (8E161) Now Available

Screenshot? Ugh, you’re doing it wrong!

Tuesday, March 21, 20:47 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Quick Thoughts on Today’s New Apple Stuff

Tuesday, March 21, 19:56 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Product Red Special Edition iPhone 7 and 7 Plus: Looks cool. But I think I’d rather see it with a black face. New 9.7-inch just-plain “iPad”: Looks like the supply chain rumor mill was almost entirely wr

Discover the Features

Tuesday, March 21, 19:38 UTC @ Martin Fowler

It's Tuesday afternoon, and for once the day of publication matches the day of the week in the Paulo's Lean Inception timetable. For this afternoon, the activity is Discover the Features. The team uses a prioritized grid of personas and goals t

Disability in the Age of Trump

Tuesday, March 21, 19:18 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Beautiful, moving comic by Amanda Scurti. ★

Should Have Posted this Yesterday

Tuesday, March 21, 14:33 UTC @ Joe's Blog

If I had posted this last night, when I initially thought of it, I’d seem like a genius now. But I generally don’t engage in speculation about new Apple announcements, so I decided to pass. Oh, well. The thing is, given the rumors of an edge-to-edge screen on the iPad coming later this year, a read more »

Does Dark Matter Exist, Or Is Gravity Wrong? The Answer Lies Billions Of Years In The Past (Synopsis)

Tuesday, March 21, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Dark matter or invisible element? You decide.” -Toba Beta The dark matter wars rage on and on, with both sides — those in favor of modifying gravity and those in favor of adding an additional mass component to the Universe — claiming victories for their own side and defeat for the other. But one piece…

/u/kibwen on Rust backlog.

Tuesday, March 21, 04:07 UTC @ gilded : rust

3,000 open issues does indeed feel like a lot, but it's still manageable, and on the lower-end of what you'll find in open-source bug trackers: GCC has tens of thousands of open bugs, Firefox has had millions of bugs filed, etc. The most important thing to keep in mind is to note and track high-priority bugs as they come in, which we do with the P-high etc. tags. That said, we love having help with triage: there's a triage meeting e

This Week in Rust 174

Tuesday, March 21, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder From Google

Tuesday, March 21, 03:44 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Robert Obryk and Jyrki Alakuijala, of Google Research Europe: At Google, we care about giving users the best possible online experience, both through our own services and products and by contributing new tools and industry standards for use by the online community. That’s why we’re excited to announce Guetzli, a new open source algorithm that creates high quality JPEG images with file si

Charlie Warzel Profiles Techmeme’s Gabe Rivera

Tuesday, March 21, 01:38 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Charlie Warzel, writing for BuzzFeed: Techmeme, then, wields tremendous power over a tremendously powerful group of people. And as its founder, Rivera has been quietly defining Silicon Valley’s narrative for the industry’s power brokers for more than a decade. But Rivera is uncomfortable — or unwilling — to reckon with how his influence has affected one of the most important and powerful industries in the world. The result is that Rivera can cast himself both as a giml

Pixure 2.2 and PanelKit

Tuesday, March 21, 00:54 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Pixure is Louis D’hauwe’s excellent pixel art app for iPad and iPhone. It’s a terrific app. You might want to check out the latest version even if you aren’t interested in creating pixel art, though — it’s the first version using D’hauwe’s own open source PanelKit framework. PanelKit allows apps to turn popovers into draggable panels, and allows for them to be pinned into place as stay-open sidebars. It

Anthony Bourdain Does Not Want to Owe Anybody Even a Single Dollar

Monday, March 20, 22:57 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Anthony Bourdain, on his approach to personal finance after having not filed taxes for 10 years and running up credit card debt that he ignored until he was 44: That was really the first time I started thinking about saving money. About not finding myself in that terrifying space, that uncertainty that goes back to childhood. Will the car get fixed? Will we be able to pay for tuition? In very short order, I contacted the IRS and I paid what I owed. I paid American Express. Since that

‘There’s a Smell of Treason in the Air’

Monday, March 20, 22:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Philip Rucker and Ashley Parker, reporting for The Washington Post: But in Monday’s remarkable, marathon hearing of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Comey said there was no such evidence. Trump’s claim, first made in a series of tweets on March 4 at a moment when associates said he was feeling under siege and stewing over the struggles of his young presidency, remains unfounded. Comey did not stop there. He confirmed publicly that the FBI was investigat

Leaked Images of Samsung Galaxy S8 From Evan Blass

Monday, March 20, 22:06 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Looks like Samsung is beating Apple to the “hardly any chin or forehead” punch. The top and bottom have bezels, but they’re so small Samsung couldn’t print their ugly logo on the front, finally moving past one of the worst aspects of every other Samsung phone to date. Are they really going to call the bigger model the “Plus”? They’re really going to rip off Apple’s naming?

★ About That Purported 10.5-Inch iPad

Monday, March 20, 19:52 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Applying Occam’s razor to these rumors, I think the most likely explanation is that Apple is working on a new edge-to-edge design iPad with a 10.5-inch display, but that it’s a 2018 thing, not a 2017 thing.

Swift Releases Have Themes

Monday, March 20, 19:25 UTC @ Ole Begemann

About a week ago, Swift Core Team member Ben Cohen wrote a thoughtful message on swift-evolution, answering a question about the chances of purely additive proposals to be accepted for

How we fool ourselves into thinking we use our time wisely

Monday, March 20, 19:20 UTC @ x.ai

We tend to see the Internet in general, and email in particular, as a massive productivity boon for knowledge workers. However, a set of interesting studies shows that email leads … View Article The post How we fool ourselves into thinking we use our time wisely appeared first on

macOS Sierra 10.12.4 beta 8 (16E192b) Now Available

Monday, March 20, 18:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

macOS Sierra 10.12.4 beta 8 (16E192b) Now Available

watchOS 3.2 beta 7 (14V5249a) Now Available

Monday, March 20, 18:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

watchOS 3.2 beta 7 (14V5249a) Now Available

Google to Revamp Ad Policies After Big Brands Boycott

Monday, March 20, 17:06 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Joe Mayes and Jeremy Kahn, reporting for Bloomberg: The U.S. company said in a blog post Friday it would give clients more control over where their ads appear on both YouTube, the video-sharing service it owns, and the Google Display Network, which posts advertising to third-party websites. The announcement came after the U.K. government and the Guardian newspaper pulled ads from the vid

Ten Incredible Pictures That Showcase Astronomy’s Future (Synopsis)

Monday, March 20, 14:02 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“With the Hubble telescope and all the other things that are out there, I believe something would have come through. Today, I really believe we are unique.” -Mark Goddard Want to identify where stars are forming (or about to form) in the Universe? We’ve got no problem using visible light, which reveals unambiguous signatures associated…

Describe the Personas

Monday, March 20, 13:58 UTC @ Martin Fowler

To build a product, we need to understand who our users are and what they want to achieve. So on the Tuesday morning of a Lean Inception, Paulo gives us an activity to

Follow Up with New Connections

Monday, March 20, 13:30 UTC @ Joe's Blog

Confession: I suck at follow-up. There have been many times in my recent past where I’ve failed miserably at following-up or following through with people, so I’m trying to make a good-faith effort to improve in this area. There are several aspects of follow up I want to explore, so I’m going to split them read more »

El duro camino de D-Wave hacia la supremacía

Monday, March 20, 13:04 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Imagina que gastas millones de dólares en construir un ordenador para resolver un problema concreto. ¿Esperarías que tras diez años de desarrollo fuera más rápido que un ordenador personal para resolver dicho problema? D-Wave QPU, que usa 2000 cubits […] Leer más

Variable Height Table View Header

Monday, March 20, 10:36 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Making a table view header that automatically adjusts its height to allow its contents to fit should not be so hard. Unfortunately it is a problem that has been with us for a number of years which means much of the advice on how to do it is out of date. This is what works for me for both iOS 9 and iOS 10. The Problem I want to show a text message as a header to a table view. The size of the table view header needs to be dynamic to avoid chopping the text label

Deceptio, -onis

Monday, March 20, 09:00 UTC @ brucknerite

En los lejanos tiempos en los que nuestros familiares mediados de mes eran formales y vagamente amenazadores idus, la decepción no era más que un engaño. Gentes prácticas aquellos latinos, que de una trampa en el suelo donde animales salvajes caían (de-) para ser capturados (capio), y alteración vocálica mediante, crearon un decipio para cualquier acción … Continúa leyendo Deceptio

LHCb descubre cinco nuevas resonancias bariónicas encantadas

Monday, March 20, 08:47 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Habrás leído que LHCb ha descubierto cinco nuevas partículas. El detector LHCb ha observado cinco estados excitados del barión encantado Ω0c (correspondientes a diferentes movimientos orbitales de sus tres quarks de valencia, ssc): Ωc(3000)0, Ωc(3050)0, Ωc(3066)0, Ωc(3090)0, y Ωc(3119)0. […]

If you want to help your bad students DO NOT give an easy exam

Monday, March 20, 03:54 UTC @ Computational Complexity

1) When I was a grad student TAing Formal Lang Theory we had a final ready to give out but noticed that one problem was too hard. So we changed it. But we made it too easy. Whoops. My thought at the time was this will help the bad students. I was wrong. Roughly speaking the students who got 70-80 on the midterm now got 90-100 on the final whereas the students who got 30-40 on the midterm got 35-45 on the final. So the bad students improved, but the better students improved more. 2

Antidepressants for van Gogh

Monday, March 20, 01:45 UTC @ John D. Cook

In a recent interview, Tyler Cowen discusses complacency, (neruo-)diversity, etc. Let me give you a time machine and send you back to Vincent van Gogh, and you have some antidepressants to make him better. What actually would you do, should you do, could you do? We really don’t know. Maybe he would have had a […]

Daring Fireball Sponsorship Openings

Monday, March 20, 01:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Down to just four open spots between now and the end of May — but that includes this week and next. We’ve had some great first-time sponsors recently. If you’ve got a cool product or service to promote, get in touch. ★

Uber President Jeff Jones Is Quitting, Citing Differences Over ‘Beliefs and Approach to Leadership’

Monday, March 20, 01:22 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Kara Swisher and Johana Bhuiyan, reporting for Recode: Jeff Jones, the president of Uber, is quitting the car-hailing company after less than a year. The move by the No. 2 exec, said sources, is directly related to the multiple controversies there, including explosive charges of sexism and sexual harassment. So was Uber’s toxic culture a surprise to Jones? Or was it even worse than what he was braced for?

Chuck Berry Dies at 90

Monday, March 20, 01:07 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Great clip from 1987’s Hail! Hail! Rock ’n’ Roll, with Chuck Berry teaching Keith Richards how to properly play the opening licks of “Carol”. Perfect. See also: This letter from Carl Sagan and NASA creative director Ann Druyan to Berry in 1986. ★

The Geometry of Stars

Monday, March 20, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

A star is a widely understood symbol used for ratings. If you’re building a UI for rating in an app, chances are you’ll be using a star in there somewhere. There are many different ways to get a star on the screen in your app, but the best way is to draw it from scratch in code. Not only does this give you total flexibility in terms of size and screen resolution and the ability to create awesome effects using core animation, it also allows you to totally nerd out on geometry. You can

Comments of the Week #153: from the expanding Universe to the CMB’s location

Sunday, March 19, 23:06 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Science and religion are both the same thing. They’re there; they’re life. If it’s not science, it’s not a fact.” -Chuck Berry We always take pride in what we put out into the world here at Starts With A Bang, and I like to think that all of you take that same pride in everything…

/u/matthieum on Can anyone help me identify what I did wrong in this piece of unsafe code?

Sunday, March 19, 19:17 UTC @ gilded : rust

I suddenly wonder about this ffi::SQLLEN type. It seems to me that whatever gets hold of the &mut indicator as *mut ffi::SQLLEN is writing 4 bytes past the end of the indicator. Are you sure it's meant to be i32, and not i64? That would explain the 4 bytes of 0s.

Quip Electric Toothbrush

Saturday, March 18, 22:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

My thanks to Quip for sponsoring this week’s DF RSS feed. Quip is a vibrating electric toothbrush with a two-minute timer, and automatic delivery of fresh brush-heads every three months. Everything your teeth need, nothing they don’t. Quip was named one of the 25 best inventions of 2016 by Time magazine. Just look at it, it’s adorable. Special offer for DF readers: get your first brush-head and toothpaste refill for free.

Recreating Asteroids With Lasers

Saturday, March 18, 21:42 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Seb Lee-Delisle recreated the vintage Asteroids coin-op game using lasers, and the result is glorious. Great video from Matt Parker. ★

Why YouTube Switched From 5-Star Ratings to Thumbs Up/Down in 2009

Saturday, March 18, 21:06 UTC @ Daring Fireball

I got a lot of pushback from readers regarding my post yesterday supporting Netflix’s switch from a 5-star rating system to a simple thumbs up/down system. The gist of the complaints is that some people do carefully consider their star ratings, and do value the granularity of being able to say that you like/dislike something a little or a lot. But of course some people take that care. The problem is that m

The uniqueness constraint

Saturday, March 18, 20:44 UTC @ bit-player

For the past few weeks the Sunday New York Times has been publishing a puzzle called Capsules, devised by Wei-Hwa Huang. Here are the instructions: Place numbers in the grid so that each outlined region contains the numbers 1 to … Continue reading →

The Case Against Uber

Saturday, March 18, 20:31 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Daniel Compton lays out the case that Uber coordinated with Anthony Levandowski to steal Google subsidiary Waymo’s self-driving car technology: From Waymo’s filings, it seems that they have Levandowski dead to rights on stealing their LiDAR designs. That alone should be enough to bring Uber’s self-driving car program to a halt and cause some big problems for Levandowski. California’s Trade Secrets law is

Web 3.0

Saturday, March 18, 19:54 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Nuevo duro varapalo a MOND gracias a VLT de ESO

Saturday, March 18, 19:21 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Las simulaciones por ordenador de la formación de galaxias sugieren que la idea MOND de Milgrom falla con las galaxias más distantes. Se publica en Nature una confirmación observacional firme de esta predicción. Las galaxias espirales hace unos diez […] Leer más

Ask Ethan: How Bright Is The Earth As Seen From The Moon? (Synopsis)

Saturday, March 18, 14:37 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.” -Neil Armstrong The full Moon is undoubtedly bright. As viewed from the Earth’s surface, it’s the second brightest object of all, after the Sun, and is more…

Leprechauns are Multiplying

Saturday, March 18, 04:00 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Littlewood’s Law and Big Data “Leprechaun-proofing” data source Neil L. is a leprechaun. He has visited Dick on St. Patrick’s Day or the evening before many times. Up until this night I had never seen him. Today, Neil’s message is more important than ever. With over a foot of snow in Buffalo this week and […]

photostream 106

Saturday, March 18, 01:34 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Roy's Peak, Wanaka, New Zealand

Netflix Is Ditching Five-Star Ratings in Favor of a Thumbs-Up

Saturday, March 18, 00:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Lauren Goode, reporting for The Verge: Netflix will soon be changing its ratings system for the first time in several years, switching from a traditional five-star rating to a thumbs-up / thumbs-down system, Netflix vice president of product Todd Yellin said in a press briefing today. “Five stars feels very yesterday now,” Yellin said. “We’re spending many billions of dollars on the titles we’re producing and licensing, and with these big catalogs, that just adds a ch

/u/paholg on Announcing the tokio-io Crate

Saturday, March 18, 00:21 UTC @ gilded : rust

Referring to rules by number but not numbering the rules means accesses are O(n). Why are they not numbered?

The Curious State of Apple Product Pricing

Friday, March 17, 21:19 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Another good column from Neil Cybart at Above Avalon: It is very difficult to find a pair of wireless headphones priced lower than AirPods. In the run-up to Apple unveiling AirPods this past September, the wireless headphone market consisted of the following players: Kanoa: $300 Bragi Dash: $299 Erato Apollo 7: $289 Skybuds: $279 Earin: $249 Motorola VerveOnes+: $249 Samsung Gear IconX: $199 Bragi Headphone: $

How a roadside rest stop inspired an entirely different approach to FAQs

Friday, March 17, 21:17 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Clickbait Headline of the Day: Wired

Friday, March 17, 21:05 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Provocative headline on Brian Barrett’s piece for Wired on Alexa coming to the Amazon iOS app: “Siri’s Not Even the Best iPhone Assistant Anymore”: What makes Alexa on iOS so intriguing isn’t just that it’s there, but where. There was already an Alexa app, a rudimentary utility that let users fiddle with the settings on their Amazon Echoes. And there have been a handful of third-party paid apps that brought some Alexa voice functionality to the iPhone. Now, tho

Podcast CB S&R 102: Varios temas de astrofísica

Friday, March 17, 19:10 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

He participado en el episodio 102 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Fast Radio Bursts; ¿Aliens?; Papas Marcianas; NASA 2017; Encélado y Europa; Materia Oscura; TRAPPIST-1,” 16 Mar 2017. “La tertulia semanal ha repasado las […] Leer más

Member of the Band – Gorilla Greivin Lopez

Friday, March 17, 18:59 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Greivin Lopez

Alexandra Petri: ‘Trump’s Budget Makes Perfect Sense and Will Fix America, and I Will Tell You Why’

Friday, March 17, 18:05 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Alexandra Petri, writing for The Washington Post on Trump’s proposed budget cuts: Environmental Protection Agency: We absolutely do not need this. Clean rivers and breathable air are making us SOFT and letting the Chinese and the Russians get the jump on us. We must go back to the America that was great, when the air was full of coal and danger and the way you could tell if the air was breathable was by carrying a canary around with you at all times, perched on your leathery, co

/u/christophe_biocca on Confusing lifetimes

Friday, March 17, 17:59 UTC @ gilded : rust

That's not necessarily a non-starter, but my recommendation is instead of making the execute take no arguments and require internal state referencing the parts of the world you care about, make it take the global state (&mut) as an argument so that it can access/mutate what it needs. This maintains the general approach you have while guaranteeing to the rust compiler that the mutable borrow is only used during a short window of time (and hence doesn't ove

System Level Breakpoints in Swift

Friday, March 17, 16:44 UTC @ Indie Stack

Any great software developer must inevitably become a great software debugger. Debugging consists largely of setting breakpoints, then landing on them to examine the state of an app at arbitrary points during its execution. There are roughly two kinds of breakpoints: those you set on your own code, and those you set on other people’s … Continue reading System Level Breakp

The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017

Friday, March 17, 15:30 UTC @ tecosystems

After clearing a series of obstacles – some mundane and irrelevant, others much less so – it’s time to publish our the bi-annual RedMonk Programming Language Rankings. As many are aware, these rankings are a continuation of the original work that Drew Conway and John Myles White first looked at the question late in 2010.

The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: January 2017

Friday, March 17, 15:30 UTC @ tecosystems

After clearing a series of obstacles – some mundane and irrelevant, others much less so – it’s time to publish our the bi-annual RedMonk Programming Language Rankings. As many are aware, these rankings are a continuation of the original work that Drew Conway and John Myles White first looked at the question late in 2010.

Google won’t be able to resist listening in on your conversations

Friday, March 17, 14:50 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Where is the cosmic microwave background?

Friday, March 17, 14:48 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“We are told to let our light shine, and if it does, we won’t need to tell anybody it does. Lighthouses don’t fire cannons to call attention to their shining- they just shine.” -Dwight L. Moody The farther away in space we look, the farther back in time we’re seeing. Light arriving from a star…

New podcast interview

Friday, March 17, 14:30 UTC @ John D. Cook

Radim Řehůřek of Rare Technologies just posted an interview he and I did a few days ago. We mostly talk about consulting: getting started, finding work, good and bad leads, etc.

Imagen 3D no invasiva de microchips hasta la nanoescala

Friday, March 17, 08:00 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Los microchips actuales se fabrican a escala nanométrica. La pticografía-tomografía de rayos-X computerizada (PXCT) permite obtener imágenes 3D del interior del circuito integrado. Se publica en Nature el último avances en PXCT de alta resolución, que alcanza una resolución […]

Swatch Group Developing Its Own Watch OS

Friday, March 17, 02:17 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Corinne Gretler, reporting for Bloomberg: Swatch Group AG said it’s developing an alternative to the iOS and Android operating systems for smartwatches as Switzerland’s largest maker of timepieces vies with Silicon Valley for control of consumers’ wrists. The company’s Tissot brand will introduce a model around the end of 2018 that uses the Swiss-made system, which will also be able to connect small objects and wearables, Swatch Chief Executive Officer Nick Hayek said i

Lack of Oxford Comma Could Cost Maine Company Millions in Overtime Dispute

Friday, March 17, 01:52 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Daniel Victor, reporting for The New York Times: A class-action lawsuit about overtime pay for truck drivers hinged entirely on a debate that has bitterly divided friends, families and foes: The dreaded — or totally necessary — Oxford comma, perhaps the most polarizing of punctuation marks. What ensued in the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and in a 29-page court decision handed down on Monday, was an exercise in high-stakes grammar pedantry th

Google Home Now Testing Audio Ads

Friday, March 17, 01:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Katyanna Quach, writing for The Register: In a car-crash video, uploaded to Twitter by Bryson Meunier, a Google Home is asked: “Okay Google, what’s my day like?” The chatbot answers the question by telling him the time, the weather and what his commute is like. So far, so good. But then, it sneakily adds: “By the way, Disney’s live action Beauty and the Beast opens today.” Soft piano music is

Paper Airplane Icons

Friday, March 17, 00:04 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Daniel Jalkut, on the use of paper airplane icons to represent sent email: I was curious to know if another email app used paper airplanes to represent drafts before Apple Mail did. I went out Googling and found all manner of representations, usually employing the paper envelope, or another snail-mail related symbol. None of them, except Mail, uses a paper airplane. So my modest research suggests that the use of a paper airplane was a pretty novel bit of design. Was it

Bloomberg Feature: ‘Did Uber Steal the Driverless Future From Google?’

Thursday, March 16, 22:10 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Fascinating feature by Max Chafkin and Mark Bergen for Bloomberg Businessweek: As Google’s car project grew, a debate raged inside the company, reflecting a broader dispute about the direction of autonomous vehicles: Should the tech come gradually and be added to cars with drivers (through features like automatic parking and highway autopilot) or all at once (for instance, a fleet of fully autonomous cars operating in a city center)? Urmson, a former Carnegie Mellon professor, prefe

NP in ZPP implies PH in ZPP

Thursday, March 16, 18:54 UTC @ Computational Complexity

If NP is in ZPP is the entire polynomial-time hierarchy in ZPP? I saw this result used in an old TCS Stackexchange post but I couldn't find a proof (comment if you know a reference). The proof that NP in BPP implies PH in BPP is

iOS 10.3 beta 7 (14E5277a) Now Available

Thursday, March 16, 18:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

iOS 10.3 beta 7 (14E5277a) Now Available

Biocombustibles para reducir las estelas blancas de los aviones comerciales

Thursday, March 16, 17:35 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Las estelas de condensación (contrails) asustan a mucha gente (que en su sinrazón les llaman chemtrails). La industria aeronáutica quiere minimizar estos cirros artificiales producidas por los aviones comerciales. Se publica en Nature que una mezcla adecuada de combustibles […]

Datación molecular de la Gran Oxidación

Thursday, March 16, 16:43 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El oxígeno molecular (O2) en la atmósfera de la Tierra tuvo su origen en la fotosíntesis realizada por cianobacterias. Los indicios geoquímicos indican que la Gran Oxidación (GOE) ocurrió hace entre 2,45 y 2,32 millardos de años. Se publica […] Leer más

Duals and double duals of Banach spaces

Thursday, March 16, 15:45 UTC @ John D. Cook

The canonical examples of natural and unnatural transformations come from linear algebra, namely the relation between a vector space and its first and second duals. We will look briefly at the finite dimensional case, then concentrate on the infinite dimensional case. Two finite-dimensional vector spaces over the same field are isomorphic if and only if […]

Natural transformations

Thursday, March 16, 15:14 UTC @ John D. Cook

The ladder of abstractions in category theory starts with categories, then functors, then natural transformations. Unfortunately, natural transformations don’t seem very natural when you first see the definition. This is ironic since the original motivation for developing category theory was to formalize the intuitive notion of a transformation being “natural.” Historically, functors were defined in order […]

Time crystals are real, but that doesn’t mean time is crystallized (Synopsis)

Thursday, March 16, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Every particular in nature, a leaf, a drop, a crystal, a moment of time is related to the whole, and partakes of the perfection of the whole.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson When you think of crystals, you likely think of an interlocked, repeating lattice of atoms or molecules. That’s exactly what a conventional crystal is. But…

A Ticking Evolutionary Clock

Thursday, March 16, 13:59 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

How quickly will a gene’s rate of evolution slow to a crawl?

What the Product is (and isn't)

Thursday, March 16, 13:05 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Paulo continues his Lean Inception discussion by moving onto an activity that explores the key characteristics of the product. Participants explicitly list bo

Linkage for the Ides of March

Thursday, March 16, 04:45 UTC @ 0xDE

Using foldable nanostructure to make materials that can transform from soft to stiff, dense to sparse, etc (G+) Voronoi analysis of soccer plays (G+)

Jon Rubinstein Named Co-CEO of World’s Biggest Hedge Fund, Fired 10 Months Later

Wednesday, March 15, 19:57 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Mary Childs, reporting for The Financial Times 10 months ago: Bridgewater has chosen former Apple executive Jon Rubinstein as the new co-chief executive of the world’s biggest hedge fund, replacing Greg Jensen as part of a 10-year handover from founder Ray Dalio. Mr Rubinstein, who also sits on the boards of Amazon.com and Qualcomm, is expected to join Bridgewater in May and to share the co-CEO role with Eileen Murray.

The RedMonk Google Next Recap

Wednesday, March 15, 19:57 UTC @ tecosystems

sogrady (Stephen O’Grady): So all the monks are back from San Francisco: what were everyone’s general impressions of Google Next? fintanr (Fintan Ryan): Overall positive steps, and the developer message around open source is strong, but still a lot of work to do. sogrady: Which part of the open source messaging resonated with you? fintanr:

The RedMonk Google Next Recap

Wednesday, March 15, 19:57 UTC @ tecosystems

sogrady (Stephen O’Grady): So all the monks are back from San Francisco: what were everyone’s general impressions of Google Next? fintanr (Fintan Ryan): Overall positive steps, and the developer message around open source is strong, but still a lot of work to do. sogrady: Which part of the open source messaging resonated with you? fintanr:

Pi Fest

Wednesday, March 15, 19:20 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Nice collection of science and research apps for the Mac, at a discount of up to 50 percent. Great apps, great deal. ★

The First Climate Model Turns 50, And Predicted Global Warming Almost Perfectly (Synopsis)

Wednesday, March 15, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Greenhouse gases are the second most important factor for climate, after the Sun.” -Syukuro Manabe In 1967, a groundbreaking paper in climate science was published, detailing the inputs and feedbacks for the first accurate climate model. You don’t have to look far to find contentions that climate models are wrong, inaccurate and unreliable: 8 of…

The Lean Inception

Wednesday, March 15, 13:37 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Agile projects don't start with a detailed plan, but let the direction of a project emerge as we learn more. But there is value in doing some upfront work to determine the vision of a new development. At ThoughtWorks, we carry out inception workshops to help do this.

No, we probably don’t live in a computer simulation

Wednesday, March 15, 12:46 UTC @ Backreaction

According to Nick Bostrom of the Future of Humanity Institute, it is likely that we live in a computer simulation. And one of our biggest existential risks is that the superintelligence running our simulation shuts it down. The simulation hypothesis, as it’s called, enjoys a certain popularity among people who like to think of themselves as intellectual, believing it speaks for their mental

No, we probably don’t live in a computer simulation

Wednesday, March 15, 12:46 UTC @ Backreaction

According to Nick Bostrom of the Future of Humanity Institute, it is likely that we live in a computer simulation. And one of our biggest existential risks is that the superintelligence running our simulation shuts it down. The simulation hypothesis, as it’s called, enjoys a certain popularity among people who like to think of themselves as intellectual, believing it speaks for their mental

Visualizar el fútbol con triangulaciones de Delaunay y diagramas de Voronoi

Wednesday, March 15, 10:06 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Más allá del control del balón, los jugadores de fútbol crean y controlan el espacio disponible en el campo. Un ejemplo típico es la apertura de líneas de ataque para los goleadores. Para visualizar este proceso, lo ideal es […] Leer más

Advanced Injection in Jersey

Wednesday, March 15, 05:27 UTC @ APIDesign - Blogs

I've just learned a new trick: proper way to do JerseyInjection. Maybe somebody finds it useful... --JaroslavTulach 05:27, 15 March 2017 (UTC)

Jonathan Zdziarski Joins Apple

Wednesday, March 15, 00:11 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jonathan Zdziarski: I’m pleased to announce that I’ve accepted a position with Apple’s Security Engineering and Architecture team, and am very excited to be working with a group of like minded individuals so passionate about protecting the security and privacy of others. This decision marks the conclusion of what I feel has been a matter of conscience for me over time. Privacy is sacred; our digital lives can reveal so much about us – our interests, our deepest thoughts

A night to talk about design

Tuesday, March 14, 23:00 UTC @ TED Blog

Designers solve problems and bring beauty to the world. At TEDNYC Design Lab, a night of talks at TED HQ in New York City hosted by design curator Chee Pearlman with content producer Cloe Shasha, six speakers pulled back the curtain to reveal the hard work and creative process behind great design. Speakers covered a […]

Meet the Spring 2017 class of TED Residents

Tuesday, March 14, 20:26 UTC @ TED Blog

On March 6, TED welcomed its latest class to the TED Residency program. As an in-house incubator for breakthrough ideas, Residents spend four months in the TED office with other exceptional people from all over the map. Each has a project that promises to make a significant contribution to the world, across several different fields. […]

Thinking Like A Senior Engineer

Tuesday, March 14, 19:08 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

“Always deliver more than expected”  —Larry Page, Google co-founder To begin, I want you to write a brief personal summary of your workday. It’s likely your list looks something like this: Sat at my computer and logged on Read my emails Updated my status Coffee! Began work on pending items

/u/heckerle on ripgrep 0.5.0 released --- includes UTF-16 support

Tuesday, March 14, 19:00 UTC @ gilded : rust

No, I don't think that's possible. First of all deque is a unbounded queue making it a magnitude slower than a bounded one. But what you want for a "proper"/"optimal" work stealing implementation instead is to reduce the contention as much as possible of course, which is generally very easily achieved by splitting your code into a fast and a slow path. And you want to make that fast ("happy") path literally as fast a

tvOS 10.2 beta 6 (14W5264a) Now Available

Tuesday, March 14, 18:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

tvOS 10.2 beta 6 (14W5264a) Now Available

Forced Exception-Handling

Tuesday, March 14, 16:52 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Yes, KV also reads "The Morning Paper," although he has to admit that he does not read everything that arrives in his inbox from that list. Of course, the paper you mention piqued my interest, and one of the things you don't point out is that it's actually a study of distributed systems failures. Now, how can we make programming harder? I know! Let's take a problem on a single system and distribute it. Someday I would like to see a paper that tells us if problems in distributed systems increase along with t

The Richest Man In Town

Tuesday, March 14, 15:03 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Evolution Runs Faster on Short Timescales

Tuesday, March 14, 14:27 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Examine evolution over the course of years or centuries, and you’ll find that it progresses much more quickly than it does over geologic time.

Eight Ramanujan posts

Tuesday, March 14, 12:59 UTC @ John D. Cook

Eight short, accessible blog posts based on the work of the intriguing mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan: Ramanujan series for computing π Ramanujan π approximation Ramanujan’s nested radical Ramanujan approximation for circumference of an ellipse Ramanujan’s most beautiful identity Ramanujan’s factorial approximation Sums of fourth powers Algorithm used for world record pi calculations

/u/DroidLogician on Hey Rustaceans! Got an easy question? Ask here (11/2017)

Tuesday, March 14, 10:23 UTC @ gilded : rust

Serde's derive automatically assumes a Serialize or Deserialize bound for all type parameters when generating their respective impls, so the generated Serialize impl looks like this: impl<N: ::serde::Serialize> ::serde::Serialize for Block<N> { // ... } But the bounds clearly aren't being satisfied, thus your error message. You can override this behavior by annotating your stru

This Week in Rust 173

Tuesday, March 14, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

McCLIM: Progress report #6

Tuesday, March 14, 01:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Dear Community, I owe you apologies for skipping reports in the meantime. Since January I'm not withdrawing money from our fundraiser thanks to other paid work, which means we have budget for more bounties. Keep in mind, that doesn't mean any work has ceased from my side. During this iteration I was preparing a paper^1 for the upcoming European Lisp Symposium

Systems Smart Enough to Know When They’re Not Smart Enough

Tuesday, March 14, 00:13 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Good piece by Josh Clark on the problems with “one true answer” search responses: Speed is a competitive advantage, and time is considered the enemy in most interfaces. That’s reflected in our industry’s fascination with download and rendering speeds, though those metrics are merely offshoots of the underlying user imperative, help me get this job done quickly. “Performance isn’t the speed of the page,” says Gerry McGovern. “It’s the speed of the ans

Quantum Algorithm Classifies 9,500 Handwritten Numbers

Monday, March 13, 18:45 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

While still in their infancy, as quantum computers edge closer to surpassing classical computers, a new discipline is emerging called quantum machine learning. Its goal is to apply quantum information processing to pattern recognition tasks such as classification, regression and clustering. By using quantum bits (qubits) instead of normal binary bits scientists expect to achieve results on highly complex […] The post

These TED2017 speakers’ talks will be broadcast live to cinemas April 24 and 25

Monday, March 13, 16:00 UTC @ TED Blog

The speaker lineup for the TED2017 conference features more than 70 thinkers and doers from around the world — including a dozen or so whose unfiltered TED Talks will be broadcast live to movie theater audiences across the U.S. and Canada. Presented with our partner BY Experience, our TED Cinema Experience event series offers three […]

Other fields of math don't prove barrier results- why do we?

Monday, March 13, 15:49 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Before FLT was solved did some people prove theorems like: FLT cannot be proven using techniques BLAH. This is important since all current proofs use BLAH. I do not believe so. Replace FLT with Goldbach's conjectures or others and I do not believe there were ever such papers. I have sometimes seen a passing reference like `the techniques of this paper cannot get past BLAH but it was not dwelled on. The most striking example of this (and what got me to righ

Towards plane spanners of degree 3

Monday, March 13, 15:48 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

Let $S$ be a finite set of points in the plane. In this paper we consider the problem of computing plane spanners of degree at most three for $S$.If $S$ is in convex position, then we present an algorithm that constructs a plane $\frac{3+4\pi}{3}$-spanner for $S$ whose vertex degree is at most 3. If $S$ is the vertex set of a non-uniform rectangular lattice, then we present an algorithm that constructs a plane $3\sqrt{2}$-spanner for $S$ whose vertex degree is at most 3. I

Extra Space When Embedding Table Views

Monday, March 13, 14:30 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

If you embed a table view (or other type of scroll view) in a container view that has a navigation bar you will most likely hit what seems to be a strange problem. You get some extra unwanted space between the bottom of the bar and the first row of the table. This is nothing new, it came with iOS 7, and the fix is simple but it can drive you crazy if you don’t realise what is happening. Mind The Gap - The Problem Here is the problem. I want t

Restoring the North Cascades Ecosystem

Monday, March 13, 05:01 UTC @ Azimuth

In 49 hours, the National Park Service will stop taking comments on an important issue: whether to reintroduce grizzly bears into the North Cascades near Seattle. If you leave a comment on their website before then, you can help make this happen! Follow the easy directions here: http://... Please go ahead! Then tell your friends […]

Fast K-best optimization for graphs of bounded treewidth

Saturday, March 11, 23:00 UTC @ 0xDE

Denis Kurz, a student of Petra Mutzel at Dortmund, visited Irvine last year. Since Kurz had already done some work on k shortest simple paths with Mutzel, that's what we worked on during his visit. Our paper is now online as a preprint: "K -Best Solutions of MSO Problems on Tree-Decomposable Graphs", arXiv:1703.02784. If you just want the k shortest paths between two vertices in a graph, and you don't care whether a path might ha

Unnatural language processing

Saturday, March 11, 14:38 UTC @ John D. Cook

Larry Wall, creator of the Perl programming language, created a custom degree plan in college, an interdisciplinary course of study in natural and artificial languages, i.e. linguistics and programming languages. Many of the features of Perl were designed as an attempt to apply natural language principles to the design of an artificial language. I’ve been […]

Is Verlinde’s Emergent Gravity compatible with General Relativity?

Saturday, March 11, 08:34 UTC @ Backreaction

Dark matter filaments, Millenium SimulationImage: Volker Springel A few months ago, Erik Verlinde published an update of his 2010 idea that gravity might originate in the entropy of so-far undetected microscopic constituents of space-time. Gravity, then, would not be fundamental but emergent. With the new formalism, he derived an equation for a modified gravitational law that, on galactic

Is Verlinde’s Emergent Gravity compatible with General Relativity?

Saturday, March 11, 08:34 UTC @ Backreaction

Dark matter filaments, Millenium SimulationImage: Volker Springel A few months ago, Erik Verlinde published an update of his 2010 idea that gravity might originate in the entropy of so-far undetected microscopic constituents of space-time. Gravity, then, would not be fundamental but emergent. With the new formalism, he derived an equation for a modified gravitational law that, on galactic

A new map of the Peruvian Amazon, the race to explore the deep ocean, and a rock album reimagined

Friday, March 10, 22:32 UTC @ TED Blog

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A map to guide conservation. After almost eight years of airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy, Greg Asner has finally mapped all 300,000 square miles of the Peruvian Amazon. Highlighting forest types that are reasonably safe and those which are in [

Devirtualization in LLVM and Clang

Friday, March 10, 21:23 UTC @ Planet Clang

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts from students who were funded by the LLVM Foundation to attend the 2016 LLVM Developers' Meeting in San Jose, CA. Please visit the LLVM Foundation's webpage for more information on our Travel Grants program. This post is from Piotr Padlewski on his work that he presented at the meeting:This blogpost will show how C++ devirtualization is performed in current (4.0) clang and LLVM and also ongoing work on -fstrict-vtable-pointers features.Devirtualization don

Prolog vs mini-Kanren

Friday, March 10, 18:37 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

There's an interesting Q&A on Stack Overflow.

Complex analysis image quilt

Friday, March 10, 15:43 UTC @ John D. Cook

A blog post by Evelyn Lamb yesterday introduced Thomas Baruchel’s web site by of images from complex analysis. I wondered what a collage of these images would look like, so I used the ImageQuilts software by Edward Tufte and Adam Schwartz to create the image below. Related: Applied complex analysis

Solution: ‘Taming Quantum Weirdness’

Friday, March 10, 13:17 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

A simple analogue could offer insights into one of the most astonishing results of quantum mechanics.

The Beauty of Computation

Thursday, March 09, 21:47 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Lisa Randall wrote a New York Times book review of Carlo Rovelli's Reality Is Not What It Seems with some

TED en Español: TED2017’s first-ever Spanish-language speaker session

Thursday, March 09, 18:38 UTC @ TED Blog

Haz clic para leer este artículo en español > For the first time ever, the annual TED Conference in Vancouver will feature an entire session of Spanish-language TED Talks, a bit of programming we felt called for celebration: We’ll be making the live session available for free online at live.ted.com on Tuesday, April 25, from 2:15 pm to 4:00 pm PT. […

¡TED lanza TED en Español en la conferencia anual con el primer bloque de charlas en Español!

Thursday, March 09, 18:32 UTC @ TED Blog

Por primera vez, la conferencia de TED en Vancouver presentará un bloque entero de charlas TED en español — una programación que sentimos que merece una celebración! Para celebrarlo, vamos a compartir este bloque por transmisión en vivo de manera abierta y gratuita en live.ted.com el martes, 25 de abril, desde las 2:15 pm y […

Who’s speaking at TED2017? Announcing our speaker lineup

Thursday, March 09, 18:13 UTC @ TED Blog

Meet the co-creator of Siri, the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, a Nobel-winning researcher who helped discover how we age, the head of the World Bank, and one of the greatest athletes of all time. We’re thrilled to announce the speaker lineup for TED2017, with a mix of illustrious names and the up-and-coming […]

How areas of math are connected

Thursday, March 09, 16:41 UTC @ John D. Cook

In my previous post, I discussed how number theory and topology relate to other areas of math. Part of that was to show a couple diagrams from  Jean Dieudonné’s book Panorama of Pure Mathematics, as seen by N. Bourbaki. That book has only small star-shaped diagrams considering one area of math at a time. I’ve created a […]

Bliki: SelfEncapsulation

Thursday, March 09, 13:17 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Data encapsulation is a central tenet in object-oriented style. This says that the fields of an object should not be exposed publicly, instead all access from outside the object should be via accessor methods (getters and setters). There are languages that allow publicly accessible fields, but we usually caution programmers not to do this. Self-encapsulation goes a step further, indicating that all internal access to a data field should also go through accessor methods as well. Only the acc

The Road Not Taken: Computer-generated poetry

Thursday, March 09, 12:31 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Roses are red, the grass is green. Here’s how poems can be written by a creative machine. Every year, millions of Chinese families gather to watch a special celebration known as the Spring Festival Gala. It is the most watched television show in the world. This year’s gala included a special online sideshow, during which China’s Central […] The post The Road Not Taken: Co

Nick Levine: enlivend @ 2017-03-09T08:52:00

Thursday, March 09, 07:52 UTC @ Planet Lisp

My domain lisp-book.org expires in two months (on 2017-05-07). I do not intend to renew it. The material which it serves will remain available via http://... If anyone wishes to inherit the domain from me and put it to better use, they should get in touch.

Mathematical balance of trade

Thursday, March 09, 04:26 UTC @ John D. Cook

Areas of math all draw on and contribute to each other. But there’s a sort of trade imbalance between areas. Some, like analytic number theory, are net importers. Others, like topology, are net exporters. Analytic number theory uses the tools of analysis, especially complex analysis, to prove theorems about integers. The first time you see […]

What’s behind the split in the conservative movement? A conversation onstage at TED HQ

Thursday, March 09, 03:38 UTC @ TED Blog

At TED HQ in New York on Wednesday, TED curator Chris Anderson moderated a lively conversation between Eliot A. Cohen, professor of strategic studies at Johns Hopkins University who served in the State Department during the George W. Bush administration, and Diana Furchtgott-Roth, an economist and Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow who held positions in the [

BALisp - YouTube

Wednesday, March 08, 20:25 UTC @ Zach Beane Common Lisp

BALisp - YouTube: There are a bunch of new videos as of yesterday.

Safeguarding Equatable Implementations

Wednesday, March 08, 18:27 UTC @ Ole Begemann

Say you have a struct: struct Person { var name: String } And you add conformance to Equatable like so: extension

Rethinking Healthcare – 11 women charting the future of health

Wednesday, March 08, 18:01 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

March 8 marks International Women’s Day – a global celebration of the societal, economical, cultural and political achievements of women. Since the early 1900s, this day serves as an opportunity to reflect on the advancements that have been made toward gender equality, and plan for where we need to go. According to a 2015 study […] The post Rethinking

How Can We Use Tech to Hack the Human Consciousness? | Rory Sutherland, Ogilvy | BoS Europe 2016

Wednesday, March 08, 16:00 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Rory Sutherland, Co-founder, OgilvyChange Rory is a world class talker and takes some shutting up. In fact, we know that which is why we scheduled this talk to be flexible. That’s why it went on for 90 minutes and no one left the room… Rory is Vice Chairman at O&M Group UK, an attractively vague […] The post How Can We Use Tech to Hack the

Is Computer Security Possible?

Wednesday, March 08, 15:28 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

The breaks keep on coming… Holly Dragoo, Yacin Nadji, Joel Odom, Chris Roberts, and Stone Tillotson are experts in computer security. They recently were featured in the GIT newsletter Cybersecurity Commentary. Today, Ken and I consider how their comments raise a basic issue about cybersecurity. Simply put: Is it possible? In the column, they discuss […]

See You in Court! New Venue for BoS Europe | Courthouse Hotel

Wednesday, March 08, 15:02 UTC @ Business of Software USA

We want to offer our guests at Business of Software Conference the best possible experience when they attend. We didn’t expect to be taking them to court. For many regular attendees BoS is a place to come to step back and think about what is important in their business. The right location and atmosphere is […] The post See You in Court! New Venue for BoS Europe | Courthouse H

‘Digital Alchemist’ Seeks Rules of Emergence

Wednesday, March 08, 14:00 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Computational physicist Sharon Glotzer is uncovering the rules by which complex collective phenomena emerge from simple building blocks.

It Was Never a Dress

Wednesday, March 08, 11:30 UTC @ Business of Software USA

We’re celebrating International Womens Day by sharing this brilliant Lightning Talk from Tania Katan, It Was Never a Dress. The Lightning Talk format is harsh – 15 slides that advance automatically every 30 seconds. Tania’s background in improvisational comedy and a minimalist approach to slides makes this one of the most memorable talks you will see. […] The post It Was Never a Dress

IBM Researchers Take Home Innovation Prize for Semiconductor Research

Wednesday, March 08, 07:58 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

IBM scientists have been recognized with the 2017 Compound Semiconductor Industry Innovation Award. The recognition is a culmination of five years of research by the Zurich-based IBM team which is focused on using high mobility materials into silicon CMOS technology to scale below 7 nanometers (nm). Consider the technology chain from mobile devices to the Internet […] The post

Joint program puts “cognitive” in chip manufacturing

Wednesday, March 08, 03:55 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Computer chips can fail in countless ways, from countless sources in the manufacturing process. Even with terabytes of sensor data pouring from the manufacturing equipment used to make them, there are still semiconductor lemons, depressing wafer yield, performance and reliability, which drives up manufacturing and speculative maintenance intervention costs. IBM and Tokyo Electron Limited (TELTM) […] The post

Them That’s Got Shall Get

Wednesday, March 08, 02:29 UTC @ inessential.com

I try — earnestly, with good faith — to understand the Republican ideologies. And I think I’ve figured out one of them: they want to make life harder for poor people so that they have more incentive to become rich, and they want to make life better for rich people to reward success, since it should be rewarded, and since doing so provides even more incentive for poor people to become rich. If you look at it just the right way, you can see it’s not entirely wrong. If the g

IBM achieves new record in speech recognition

Tuesday, March 07, 20:09 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Depending on whom you ask, humans miss one to two words out of every 20 they hear. In a five-minute conversation, that could be as many 80 words. But, for most of us speech recognition isn’t a problem. Imagine, though, how difficult it is for a computer? Last year, IBM announced a major milestone in […] The post IBM achieves new record in speech recognition appeared first on

Pi and the Golden Ratio

Tuesday, March 07, 16:47 UTC @ Azimuth

Two of my favorite numbers are pi: and the golden ratio: They’re related: Greg Egan and I came up with this formula last weekend. It’s probably not new, and it certainly wouldn’t surprise experts, but it’s still fun coming up with a formula like this. Let me explain how we did it. History has a […]

Apple Pay Has Expanded to Ireland

Tuesday, March 07, 16:30 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

You can now support Apple Pay for your customers in Ireland, providing an easy and secure way for them to pay within your app and website with a single touch. Learn more about Apple Pay.

So you want to be like Steve Jobs?

Tuesday, March 07, 13:53 UTC @ Business of Software USA

How many entrepreneurs do you know who model themselves, consciously or unconsciously, on Steve Jobs? By all accounts, Steve Jobs combined incredible genius and an ability to get things done with a personality that could politely be described as ‘difficult’. In fact, many people who worked for him describe him as an asshole. Despite everything, […] The post So you want to be like Steve Jobs?

Nathan Froyd: nibbles and ironclad releases

Tuesday, March 07, 12:12 UTC @ Planet Lisp

I have released new versions of nibbles (0.13) and ironclad (0.34). They are available from their respective tags in their github repositories; I have not created tarballs for them. Ironclad, in particular, has many new features; please see the NEWS files for both packages for some of the changes.This is also an appropriate time to announce that I will no longer be maintaining nibbles, ironclad, nor any of my other Common Lisp packages. This has been the de facto state of affairs for several yea

This Week in Rust 172

Tuesday, March 07, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

How did x.ai turn a single user product into an enterprise product? Dennis explains on 20 Minute VC

Monday, March 06, 23:13 UTC @ x.ai

Last week, Dennis returned to The Twenty Minute VC with Harry Stebbings to discuss x.ai’s move into the enterprise with the launch of our Business edition. Listen to the interview here. Here’s … View Article The post How did x.ai turn a single user product into an enterprise product? Dennis explains on 20 Minute VC appeared first on

Some news about apt.llvm.org

Monday, March 06, 20:59 UTC @ Planet Clang

apt.llvm.org provides Debian and Ubuntu repositories for every maintained version of these distributions. LLVM, Clang, clang extra tools, compiler-rt, polly, LLDB and LLD packages are generated for the stable, stabilization and development branches.As it seems that we have more and more users of these packages, I would like to share an update about various recent changes.New featuresLLDFirst, the cool new stuff : lld is now proposed and built for i386/amd64 on all Debian and Ubuntu supported versions. The t

WWDC Scholarship Details Now Available

Monday, March 06, 18:35 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

WWDC Scholarships reward talented students and STEM organization members with the opportunity to attend this year’s conference. Developers selected for a scholarship will receive a WWDC17 ticket and lodging free of charge.Learn more about WWDC Scholarships.

why are regular expressions defined the way they are

Monday, March 06, 18:01 UTC @ Computational Complexity

BILL: The best way to prove closure properties of regular languages is to first prove the equiv of DFA's, NDFA's and Reg Expressions. Then, if you want to prove a closure property, choose the definition of regular that makes it easiest. For example, to prove Reg Langs closed under intersection I would use DFA's, NOT Reg Expressions. STUDENT: I thought reg expressions were a) finite sets b) if alpha and beta are reg exp then so are alpha UNION beta, alpha INTER

Enums, Equatable, and Exhaustiveness

Monday, March 06, 17:57 UTC @ Ole Begemann

Say you have this Swift enum: enum Expression { case number(Double) case string(String) } And you want it to conform to

MongoDB's JavaScript Fuzzer

Monday, March 06, 17:07 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

As MongoDB becomes more feature-rich and complex with time, the need to develop more sophisticated methods for finding bugs grows as well. Three years ago, MongDB added a home-grown JavaScript fuzzer to its toolkit, and it is now our most prolific bug-finding tool, responsible for detecting almost 200 bugs over the course of two release cycles. These bugs span a range of MongoDB components from sharding to the storage engine, with symptoms ranging from deadlocks to data inconsistency. The fuzzer runs as par

Quicklisp news: Quicklisp client update: bundling local-projects

Monday, March 06, 15:45 UTC @ Planet Lisp

The Quicklisp library bundle feature has been around for a while. It creates a "bundle" of libraries from Quicklisp that can be used standalone, without loading or using Quicklisp at all. Today, I published an updated client with a new bundle feature: if :include-local-projects is true, everything in Quicklisp's ql:*local-project-directories* is copied into the bundle and made available when the bundle is loaded. To get

First steps towards programming a quantum computer over the cloud

Monday, March 06, 05:01 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Since last year, scientists, students, and the quantum computing curious have been able to explore the world’s first and only cloud-enabled quantum computing platform, the IBM Quantum Experience. They’re running well-known canonical quantum algorithms, such as two-qubit Grover’s Search, and even trying their own experiments on our IBM Cloud-hosted five-qubit quantum processor. We designed the […] The post

Nutrition for Remote Workers

Monday, March 06, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Introduction At MartianCraft, remote work is a big part of our lives. We’ve written about challenges of working remotely and we’ve explored the benefits of sharing in family life. For many of us, the step from on-site to remote work comes with a lot of changes, and challenges. One of the most noticeable changes I’ve experienced after I sta

New committer: Eugene Grosbein (ports)

Saturday, March 04, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

Member of the Band – Gorilla Oscar Alfaro

Friday, March 03, 18:17 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Oscar Alfaro 

Implicit Swift Dependencies

Friday, March 03, 18:03 UTC @ Indie Stack

If you’re developing in Swift for Mac or iOS, you need to ensure that any standard Swift libraries are also copied into your app bundle. Typically this is handled automatically by Xcode when it detects the presence of any Swift files in your app. If your app is entirely Objective-C, but you link against your … Continue reading Implicit Swift Dependencies

Improving on the Unix shell

Friday, March 03, 12:28 UTC @ John D. Cook

Yesterday I ran across Askar Safin’s blog post The Collapse of the UNIX Philosophy. Two quotes from the post stood out. One was from Rob Pike about the Unix ideal of little tools that each do one job: Those days are dead and gone and the eulogy was delivered by Perl. The other was a […]

Returning committer: Rodney W. Grimes (src)

Friday, March 03, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

/u/edef1c on [WIP] rd: A (very early) command-line interface to Rust documentation

Thursday, March 02, 23:08 UTC @ gilded : rust

(from my IRC ramblings) call it ruman, as in "polluting the 2-character namespace is rude, man"

Lispjobs: Clojure Web Developer, Kira Systems, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Thursday, March 02, 21:01 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Full list: https://... We're looking for a developer to be a part of the core team for our Clojure and ClojureScript web application. Our stack includes reactive single-page web client code and a distributed backend to handle internal computations. You will be responsible for designing, implementing, and testing functionality in our web application

Yes, a violation of energy conservation can explain the cosmological constant

Thursday, March 02, 16:58 UTC @ Backreaction

Chad Orzel recently pointed me towards an article in Physics World according to which “Dark energy emerges when energy conservation is violated.” Quoted in the Physics World article are George Ellis, who enthusiastically notes that the idea is “no more fanciful than many other ideas being explored in theoretical physics at present,” and Lee Smolin, according to whom it’s “speculative, but in the

Yes, a violation of energy conservation can explain the cosmological constant

Thursday, March 02, 16:58 UTC @ Backreaction

Chad Orzel recently pointed me towards an article in Physics World according to which “Dark energy emerges when energy conservation is violated.” Quoted in the Physics World article are George Ellis, who enthusiastically notes that the idea is “no more fanciful than many other ideas being explored in theoretical physics at present,” and Lee Smolin, according to whom it’s “speculative, but in the

Why more expensive doesn’t always mean better features, particularly for scheduling assistants

Thursday, March 02, 15:36 UTC @ x.ai

In many realms, the higher the price tag the more advanced the feature set. The rule of thumb is more $ = better stuff. This near direct relationship between the … View Article The post Why more expensive doesn’t always mean better features, particularly for scheduling assistants appeared first on x.ai.

New Number Systems Seek Their Lost Primes

Thursday, March 02, 14:09 UTC @ mathematics – Quanta Magazine

For centuries, mathematicians tried to solve problems by adding new values to the usual numbers. Now they’re investigating the unintended consequences of that tinkering.

How Big Data is Making Scientists Smarter about Ebola

Thursday, March 02, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak was a tragedy of enormous proportions. It caused the death of over 11,000 people, while more than 28,000 cases have been reported. From a socioeconomic, perspective, it has brought close to collapse the three African countries most directly impacted: Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. During the outbreak and immediately […] The post Ho

International Science

Thursday, March 02, 13:02 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I did some counting and the 35 academic faculty members in the Georgia Tech School of Computer Science come from 14 different countries. My co-authors come from at least 20 different nations. My 10 successful PhD students hail from 7 different countries. I have benefited immensely from global collaborations thanks to relatively open borders and communication during most of my academic career and I am hardly the only academic who has done so. I'm old enough to remember the days of the cold war w

Composable UIs

Thursday, March 02, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

One important aspect that as developers, we should keep in mind, is trying to reuse the code that we write whenever it’s possible. The main reason behind that is saving time. For example, if you write a cell for your app, TrackCell and you need the same (or similar) cell in a different collection view, you should try to reuse the one that you already have. However, sometimes the specifications of that cell change a little bit, and we end up with a bunch o

Can we heal the fractured political conversation? A talk with Gretchen Carlson and David Brooks

Wednesday, March 01, 23:10 UTC @ TED Blog

In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson at TED HQ in New York on Wednesday, New York Times columnist David Brooks and journalist Gretchen Carlson discussed how and why America has become so polarized — and where we can find common ground. Set between lively renditions of “America the Beautiful” and “Go Down Moses” performed

Scaling Agile Series Part 2: A look at Two of Four Popular Agile Scaling Frameworks: SoS and LeSS

Wednesday, March 01, 18:37 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

In my previous post, Can You Scale Agility, I set the stage for why I am exploring whether true agility is possible in a scaled environment.   Starting with Scaling Frameworks   The intent of this post is not to convince you that one scaling framework is better than another.  I do however, intend to look at some of the more prevalent practices and offer my opinion on whether on

The slime-selector

Wednesday, March 01, 15:27 UTC @ Zach Beane Common Lisp

I use and love the slime-selector. It’s a very quick way to jump around between various SLIME buffers. In my .emacs, C-c s is bound to slime-selector with (global-set-key "\C-cs" 'slime-selector) Then, in any buffer, I can use \C-c s to pop up a minibuffer selector that takes a single additional key. Here’s the list of keys and what they do: 4: Select in other window ?: Selector help buf

Numerically integrating periodic functions

Wednesday, March 01, 14:40 UTC @ John D. Cook

The trapezoid rule is the most obvious numerical integration technique. It comes directly from the definition of a definite integral, just a Riemann sum. It’s a very crude technique in general; you can get much more accuracy with the same number of function evaluations by using a more sophisticated method. But for smooth periodic functions, […]

Does Anybody Listen to You?

Wednesday, March 01, 10:03 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

An idea on its own is not worth much. Just because you think you know a better way to do something, even if you're right, no one is required to care. Making great things happen at work is about more than just being smart. Good ideas succeed or fail depending on your ability to communicate them correctly to the people who have the power to make them happen. When you are navigating an organization, it pays to know whom to talk to and how to reach them. Here is a simple guide to sending your ideas up the chain

Linkage

Wednesday, March 01, 05:35 UTC @ 0xDE

Emmanuelle Moureaux's walk-through forest of colored digits reminds me of some earlier digital art (G+) Sariel peels huge grids, with the result appearing to approximate the affi

Call for talk proposals: !!Con 2017

Wednesday, March 01, 00:39 UTC @ composition.al

!!Con (pronounced “bang bang con”) is a conference of ten-minute talks about the joy, excitement, and surprise of computing. I co-founded !!Con with a group of friends from the Recurse Center back in 2014, and it’s been held annually in New York each May since then. Right now, we’re prepa

★ On Today’s Curious Wall Street Journal Report Claiming the Next iPhone Will Replace Lightning Port With USB-C

Wednesday, March 01, 00:15 UTC @ Daring Fireball

If there’s any truth to it, I’d bet that this year’s iPhones will ship with USB-C chargers, that use a USB-C to Lightning cable to connect to the phones. That makes sense, given that Apple has dropped USB-A ports from the newest MacBook models.

Swift for Objective C Programmers

Tuesday, February 28, 19:01 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

In WWDC 2014 when Apple introduced Swift, a multi-paradigm language created by Apple, many developers thought Swift would substitute Objective-C for iOS and Mac development. Swift has seen several changes since then and evolved into what we see today. However, many iOS developers are still

Launching the x.ai Business edition

Tuesday, February 28, 16:05 UTC @ x.ai

Today, we’re excited to announce the launch of our Business edition, which is designed for teams. x.ai makes an AI assistant who schedules meetings for you—Amy or Andrew Ingram. There’s … View Article The post Launching the x.ai Business edition appeared first on x.ai.

Inside the Knotty World of ‘Anyon’ Particles

Tuesday, February 28, 15:11 UTC @ physics – Quanta Magazine

A new class of quantum particle is about to emerge from the tangled considerations of quantum statistics.

Looking at Model-View-Controller in Cocoa

Tuesday, February 28, 08:49 UTC @ Cocoa with Love on Cocoa with Love

According to Apple’s documentation, the standard pattern for Cocoa applications is called Model-View-Controller. Despite the name, this pattern is quite unlike the original definition of Model-View-Controller in Smalltalk-80. Cocoa’s application design pattern actually shares more in common with ideas developed at Taligent (an Apple co-developed project from the 1990s) than with the original Smalltalk origin of the term. In this article, I’ll look at a little theory and history

“When you plan too much you will miss the opportunities that come along”

Tuesday, February 28, 08:38 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

After 37 years, Ton Engbersen has officially retired from IBM Research – Zurich. His career has spanned such diverse areas as image processing, chip design, communications technology, server technology, legacy management and innovation in outsourcing. In January 2017, Ton was appointed honorary professor of Data Science Engineering in the Institute of Artificial Intelligence & Cognitive Engineering (ALICE) of […] The post

This Week in Rust 171

Tuesday, February 28, 05:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Why does a Turing-complete type system make type checking undecidable?

Tuesday, February 28, 02:50 UTC @ composition.al

Last May, I wrote about an article by Radu Grigore claiming that “all Java type checkers have bugs”, and what that claim could mean. Later, Grigore expanded his original short article into a full-length paper that appeared at POPL 2017 a few weeks ago. The appearance of “Java Generics are Turing Complete

Didier Verna: Declt 2.1 "Jonathan Archer" is out

Tuesday, February 28, 00:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

I'm happy to announce the release of Declt 2.1 "Jonathan Archer". New in this release: Handle recent change in SBCL's SB-INT:INFO API. Handle list of contacts (strings) in ASDF systems author and maintainer slots. Some backward-incompatible changes in the keyword arguments to the DECLT function. More hyperlinks between systems and source files. More robust system's packages collection (no more code walking). More

Working Backward

Monday, February 27, 20:44 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

With a little more from Smullyan YouTube source Maurice Ashley is an American chess grandmaster. He played for the US Championship in 2003. He coached two youth teams from Harlem to national championships and played himself in one scene of the movie Brooklyn Castle. He created a TEDYouth video titled, “Working Backward to Solve Problems.” […]

Container View Controllers

Monday, February 27, 19:21 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Massive View Controllers are a common pain with iOS development. A quick search will give you much good advice on how to slim down these monsters. In this post I want to give some attention to the often overlooked use of Container View Controllers. Too Many Responsibilities Take a look at this user interface. The top half is a table view listing countries with a latitude and longitude coordinate. The bottom half is a standard iOS

Are polar coordinates backward?

Monday, February 27, 16:26 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’d never given any thought to the order of polar coordinates until yesterday. They’re written (r, θ). That’s just how it is. But a friend pointed out two reasons why this bothers him. First, r is typically a function of θ, just as y is typically a function of x. But in rectangular coordinates, the […]

IBM at SPIE: Seven Advancements for Beyond 7nm Chips

Monday, February 27, 14:08 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

When we announced the industry’s first functional 7 nanometer node (7nm) test chips in 2015, with our GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung partners, we knew the process for the chips to reach “manufacturing maturity” – perhaps as early as next year, would be rapid. As that effort accelerates in the semiconductor industry, IBM continues to push the […] The post IBM at SPIE: Seven A

Quicklisp news: February 2017 Quicklisp dist update now available

Monday, February 27, 13:57 UTC @ Planet Lisp

New projects: agnostic-lizard — A portable code walker that makes a best effort to be correct in most cases — GPLv3+bit-ops — Optimized bit-vector operations — LLGPLcl-forest — Unofficial Common Lisp bindings to Rigetti Forest. — Apache 2.0

FreeBSD Project to participate in Google Summer of Code 2017

Monday, February 27, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

The FreeBSD Project is pleased to announce its participation in Google's 2017 Summer of Code program, which funds summer students to participate in open source projects. This will be the FreeBSD Project's thirteenth year in the program, having mentored over 200 successful students through summer-long coding projects between 2005 and 2016.

Should we learn from the Masters or the Pupils (Sequel)

Monday, February 27, 03:44 UTC @ Computational Complexity

A while back I had a blog entry Should we learn from the Masters of the Pupils? The Masters may have more insights but he Pupils may have a better view aided by a modern viewpoint. Sometimes the Masters are in a different language or not in the modern style but you still want to know what they did and why. As I blogged about earlier (See

Function on cover of Abramowitz & Stegun

Sunday, February 26, 22:37 UTC @ John D. Cook

Someone mailed me this afternoon asking if I knew what function was graphed on the cover of Abramowitz and Stegun’s famous Handbook of Mathematical Functions. Here’s a close-up of the graph from a photo of my copy of A&S. This was my reply. It looks like a complex function of a complex variable. I assume […]

Bessel series for a constant

Sunday, February 26, 20:20 UTC @ John D. Cook

Fourier series express functions as a sum of sines and cosines of different frequencies. Bessel series are analogous, expressing functions as a sum of Bessel functions of different orders. Fourier series arise naturally when working in rectangular coordinates. Bessel series arise naturally when working in polar coordinates. The Fourier series for a constant is trivial. […]

More quick links

Sunday, February 26, 18:52 UTC @ Geeking with Greg

Some of the tech news I found interesting lately, and you might too: "In addition to making our systems more intelligent, we have to make them more intelligible too ... AI systems to augment human capabilities ... A human-centered approach is more important than ever." ([1]) "Understanding the brain is a fascinating problem but ... separate from the goal of AI which is solving problems ... We don’t need to du

The weirdest subclass I've ever written

Saturday, February 25, 23:47 UTC @ Cocoa with Love on Cocoa with Love

Object-oriented programming is losing popularity and some newer programming languages like Go and Rust don’t offer subclassing at all. In Swift, there’s a push for “protocol-oriented programming” where shared interfaces, default behaviors and substitutability are achieved through protocols rather than subclasses. We should limit our use of subclasses to when we interoperate with Objective-C or we need to inherit both data members and behavior from another class, right?

Digital encoding. Legacy software. Evolution.

Saturday, February 25, 21:28 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

We’ve finally got to the point in the software world where no big changes are possible. Every change breaks something, introduces backward incompatibilities and so on. More are more we are going to live in the world where software mutates gradually, advancing is small steps without much plan and intelligent design. Similarly to how organisms are dragged by natural selection, it is going to be propelled in unknown direction without asking us whether we like it or not. Wh

Member of the Band – Gorilla Waldier Arguedas

Friday, February 24, 19:24 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Waldier Arguedas  

AMA | Art Papas, CEO, Bullhorn | 28 March 2017 at 17.00 GMT

Friday, February 24, 14:30 UTC @ Business of Software USA

In his talk at BoS USA, Art Papas shared his journey as founder and CEO of Bullhorn – a company that has grown extremely rapidly to more than 500 employees and nearly $100 million in revenue. He explains why and how he had to refocus his company’s culture back on customer service after facing a […] The post AMA | Art Papas, CEO, Bullhorn | 28 March 2017 at 17.00 GMT appe

SHA1 is no longer recommended, but hardly a failure

Friday, February 24, 14:16 UTC @ John D. Cook

The web is all abuzz about how SHA1 is “broken”, “a failure,” “obsolete”, etc. It is supposed to be computationally impractical to create two documents that have the same secure hash code, and yet Google has demonstrated that they have done just that for the SHA1 algorithm. I’d like to make two simple observations to […]

AMA | Jeff Gothelf & Josh Seiden | 15 March 2017 at 17.00 GMT

Friday, February 24, 13:51 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Join Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden, co-authors of Sense and Respond to discuss the new rules of work and anything else you want to ask. Software has fundamentally changed the way business works. It’s not simply that software has given us new ways to reach our customers, or new capabilities to achieve our goals. Software […] The post AMA | Jeff Gothelf & Josh Seiden | 15

Step away from the internet, and other ways to fight tyranny: A conversation with Timothy Snyder and Rick Perlstein

Friday, February 24, 00:35 UTC @ TED Blog

Timothy Snyder grew up in America, but as a historian of 20th-century Europe at Yale, he’s spent much of his adult life in, or thinking deeply about, Central and Eastern Europe. And what he sees there — especially in looking at the Europe of the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s — is a pattern that may […]

Don’t Be Scared If You Have to Get an MRI

Thursday, February 23, 21:37 UTC @ inessential.com

“Totally normal,” said my neurologist of the results of the MRI on my head. No worries. I was afraid to get an MRI in the first place. I got a crown last week, and that didn’t worry me — it’s my ninth. Breathe the gas and just chill for a while. No big deal. It’s almost sad when it’s over. But I was afraid to get the MRI, because I’m slightly claustrophobic, and all I knew was that they’d put me in a big tube and then walk away. How It Went I d

Where in the world has Humanae been?

Thursday, February 23, 19:36 UTC @ TED Blog

Photographer Angélica Dass captures some of humanity’s truest colors through her portrait project Humanae, a catalogue of human skin color displayed as a simple, captivating collage of Pantone portraits that reflects the deepest shades of brown and black, to the lighter tones of white, pink and everything in between. For Dass, Humanae is more than […]

Saving Climate Data (Part 6)

Thursday, February 23, 17:22 UTC @ Azimuth

Scott Pruitt, who filed legal challenges against Environmental Protection Agency rules fourteen times, working hand in hand with oil and gas companies, is now head of that agency. What does that mean about the safety of climate data on the EPA’s websites? Here is an inside report: • Dawn Reeves, EPA preserves Obama-Era website but […]

Growth & Arrogance vs. The Power of a Customer Centric Culture | Art Papas, Bullhorn | BoS USA 2015

Thursday, February 23, 16:26 UTC @ Business of Software USA

From growth arrogance to customer-centric culture Art Papas, CEO, Bullhorn In this talk, Art Papas shares his journey as founder and CEO of Bullhorn – a company that has grown extremely rapidly to more than 500 employees and nearly $100 million in revenue. He explains why and how he had to refocus his company’s culture […] The post

Breaking 50: The Kenyan Government & IBM Research Collaborate to Improve the Country’s Ease of Doing Business Ranking

Thursday, February 23, 16:22 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

This past November, the World Bank released its annual Doing Business ranking of the world’s economies. The survey is an important guide for everyone from economists to entrepreneurs to large enterprises who wish to expand into new markets. In fact, research released by the World Bank in 2012 illustrated that a one per cent increase in […] The post

Physicists Uncover Geometric ‘Theory Space’

Thursday, February 23, 14:11 UTC @ physics – Quanta Magazine

A decades-old method called the “bootstrap” is enabling new discoveries about the geometry underlying all quantum theories.

Book Review: “The Particle Zoo” by Gavin Hesketh

Thursday, February 23, 12:46 UTC @ Backreaction

The Particle Zoo: The Search for the Fundamental Nature of Reality By Gavin Hesketh Quercus (1 Sept. 2016) The first word in Gavin Hesketh’s book The Particle Zoo is “Beauty.” I read the word, closed the book, and didn’t reopen it for several months. Having just myself finished writing a book about the role of beauty in theoretical physics, it was the absolutely last thing I wanted to hear about

Book Review: “The Particle Zoo” by Gavin Hesketh

Thursday, February 23, 12:46 UTC @ Backreaction

The Particle Zoo: The Search for the Fundamental Nature of Reality By Gavin Hesketh Quercus (1 Sept. 2016) The first word in Gavin Hesketh’s book The Particle Zoo is “Beauty.” I read the word, closed the book, and didn’t reopen it for several months. Having just myself finished writing a book about the role of beauty in theoretical physics, it was the absolutely last thing I wanted to hear about

Ken Arrow and Oscars Voting

Thursday, February 23, 12:07 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Kenneth Arrow, the Nobel Prize winning economist known for his work on social choice and general equilibrium, passed away Tuesday at the age of 95. I can't cover Arrow's broad influential work in this blog post even if I were an economist but I would like to talk about Ken Arrow's perhaps best known work, his

FreeBSD-SA-17:02.openssl

Thursday, February 23, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD Security Advisories

Watch now: What’s next for democracy? A live Facebook chat

Wednesday, February 22, 21:23 UTC @ TED Blog

Join us now on Facebook Live for another episode of TED Dialogues, our response to current events, adding insight, context and nuance to the conversations we’re having right now. Join us Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 1–2pm on TED’s Facebook page. Our speakers are two historians who will try to help us make sense of […]

Nicolas Hafner: Portacle - Adventures in Cross-Platform Deployment - Confession 72

Wednesday, February 22, 18:58 UTC @ Planet Lisp

As announced in my previous post, I've decided to do a write-up that illustrates my adventures in developing Portacle, a cross-platform, portable, installer-less, self-contained Common Lisp development environment. The reason why I started with portacle in the first place is that, some day, probably in the distant future, I want to write a long series of long articles th

OmniOutliner Essentials

Wednesday, February 22, 18:17 UTC @ inessential.com

Omni introduces OmniOutliner Essentials: We didn’t want to just reach out to our existing audience; we wanted to introduce the joys and benefits of outlining to a much larger audience. We decided that meant two things: we needed to make the app much simpler, and we needed to make it much more affordable. It’s in public preview now.

Making Money Using Math

Wednesday, February 22, 16:17 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

A big difference between human-written code and learned models is that the latter are usually not represented by text and hence are not understandable by human developers or manipulable by existing tools. The consequence is that none of the traditional software engineering techniques for conventional programs (such as code reviews, source control, and debugging) are applicable anymore. Since incomprehensibility is not unique to learned code, these aspects are not of concern here.

Assignment complete, twenty years later

Wednesday, February 22, 12:55 UTC @ John D. Cook

In one section of his book The Great Good Thing, novelist Andrew Klavan describes how he bluffed his way through high school and college, not reading anything he was assigned. He doesn’t say what he majored in, but apparently he got an English degree without reading a book. He only tells of one occasion where […]

2016 LLVM Developers' Meeting - Experience from Johannes Doerfert, Travel Grant Recipient

Wednesday, February 22, 07:26 UTC @ Planet Clang

This blog post is part of a series of blog posts from students who were funded by the LLVM Foundation to attend the 2016 LLVM Developers' Meeting in San Jose, CA. Please visit the LLVM Foundation's webpage for more information on our Travel Grants program.This post is from Johannes Doerfert:2016 was my third time attending the US LLVM developers meeting and for the third year in a row I was impressed by the quality of the talks, the organization and the diversity of attendees. The hands on experiences th

Microresumés

Tuesday, February 21, 22:42 UTC @ John D. Cook

I posted a couple things on Twitter today about micro-resumés. First, here’s how I’d summarize my work in a tweet. What I’ve done: Math prof, programmer, statistician What I do now: Consulting #microresume — John D. Cook (@JohnDCook) February 21, 2017 (The formatting is a little off above. It’s leaving out a couple line breaks […]

How to: Have your AI assistant add notes to a meeting

Tuesday, February 21, 20:19 UTC @ x.ai

It happens, we all forget things. You’re the last one out of the office, and you can’t remember if you locked the door behind you. Or you have a colleague … View Article The post How to: Have your AI assistant add notes to a meeting appeared first on x.ai

In Mathematics, ‘You Cannot Be Lied To’

Tuesday, February 21, 13:37 UTC @ mathematics – Quanta Magazine

For Sylvia Serfaty, mathematics is all about truth and beauty and building scientific and human connections.

Visualizing graph spectra like chemical spectra

Tuesday, February 21, 13:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

You can associate a matrix with a graph and find the eigenvalues of that matrix. This gives you a spectrum associated with the graph. This spectrum tells you something about the graph analogous to the way the spectrum of a star’s light tells you something about the chemical composition of the start. So maybe it […]

Creating Enterprise iOS App Download Pages

Tuesday, February 21, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

TestFlight is a great way to distribute apps to select user bases to test upcoming features, but enterprise organizations have different needs than those TestFlight can provide, especially as it relates to build expiration and user enrollment limits. With an Enterprise Apple developer account you have the ability to distribute apps outside of the App Store and TestFlight using the generated enterprise distribution certificate. This method is mostly used within organizations to distribute producti

Core Data Update

Tuesday, February 21, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Dear all, After our Functional Swift and Advanced Swift books already got the Swift 3 treatment, we finally released the Swift 3 update for our Core Data book as well. This update took much longer than we expected, because we had to work around some hurdles in the publication process. Sorry for the delay! This update brings the book

Watson’s detective work could help stop the “silent thief of sight”

Monday, February 20, 21:30 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. The disease progresses very slowly and destroys vision gradually, starting with the side vision and narrowing over time.  It often remains undetected until irreversible eye sight is lost at later stages. It’s no surprise then, that glaucoma has earned a reputation as the “silent thief of […] The post

★ The World’s Worst Cocktail: The Alexa Martini

Monday, February 20, 20:10 UTC @ Daring Fireball

“I don’t know, go check Wikipedia” is a much better response than a wrong answer.

443-001

Monday, February 20, 19:27 UTC @ brucknerite

En lo más escondido de mi memoria de cobre y grasa hay un taller grande, ruidos de tornos y fresas, olor a soldadura y a virutas de metal. Hay voces, herramientas hidráulicas, algún grito de dolor y manos tiznadas y magulladas. Y hay luz, y después lluvia del cielo, y más luz, y en el … Continúa leyendo 443-001

Mailing list turns 20

Monday, February 20, 10:15 UTC @ Lua: news

The Lua mailing list is now 20 years old.

Swift Integer Quick Guide

Monday, February 20, 09:42 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

If you are new to Swift and have some experience with “C” style languages you probably have not given the Swift integer types much thought. They mostly work as you expect until one day something catches you out. There were a number of operators such as the overflow operators &+, &- and &*, dealing with exact bit patterns and failable numeric intializers that were new to me. So here is my quick guide to Swift integers.

The benefits of Recreational Mathematics

Monday, February 20, 04:25 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Why study Recreational Mathematics? Why do recreational Mathematics? 1) The line between recreational and serious mathematics is thin. Some of the problems in so-called recreational math are harder than they look. 2) Inspiring. Both Lance and I were inspired by books by Martin Gardner, Ray Smullyan, Brian Hayes, and others. 3) Pedagogical: Understanding Godel's Inc. theorem via the Liar's paradox (Ray S has popularized that approach) is a nice way to teac

Triangle-free penny graphs are 2-degenerate

Monday, February 20, 03:28 UTC @ 0xDE

A penny graph (the topic of today's new Wikipedia article) is what you get from pennies by shoving them together on a tabletop, keeping them only one layer thick, and looking at which pairs of pennies are touching each other. In a 2009 paper, Konrad Swanepoel suggested that, when there are no three mutually-touching pennies, the number of adjacencies should be at most 2n − 2√n. I don't know how to prove that, and as far as I k

MIPS: Backport workaround for compact unwind tables.

Monday, February 20, 01:29 UTC @ Recent commits to luajit-2.0

Publishing in Science: Predicting how molecules smell

Monday, February 20, 01:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Although the Roman philosopher Lucretius was right when he wrote that odors were caused by a flow of atoms emitted by objects, smell may still be the least understood of our five senses. While we use it every day, science has not fully understood how molecules produce an odor, or how to determine what they […] The post Publishing in Science: Predicting how molecules smell

Fake news wasn’t hard to predict – But what’s next?

Sunday, February 19, 16:58 UTC @ Backreaction

In 2008, I wrote a blogpost which began with a dark vision – a presidential election led astray by fake news. I’m not much of a prophet, but it wasn’t hard to predict. Journalism, for too long, attempted the impossible: Make people pay for news they don’t want to hear. It worked, because news providers, by and large, shared an ethical code. Journalists aspired to tell the truth; their

Fake news wasn’t hard to predict – But what’s next?

Sunday, February 19, 16:58 UTC @ Backreaction

In 2008, I wrote a blogpost which began with a dark vision – a presidential election led astray by fake news. I’m not much of a prophet, but it wasn’t hard to predict. Journalism, for too long, attempted the impossible: Make people pay for news they don’t want to hear. It worked, because news providers, by and large, shared an ethical code. Journalists aspired to tell the truth; their

Approximating minimum-area rectangular and convex containers for packing convex polygons

Saturday, February 18, 19:30 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

We investigate the problem of finding a minimum-area container for the disjoint packing of a set of convex polygons by translations. In particular, we consider axis-parallel rectangles or arbitrary convex sets as containers. For both optimization problems which are NP-hard we develop efficient constant factor approximation algorithms.

Azimuth Backup Project (Part 4)

Saturday, February 18, 19:27 UTC @ Azimuth

The Azimuth Climate Data Backup Project is going well! Our Kickstarter campaign ended on January 31st and the money has recently reached us. Our original goal was $5000. We got $20,427 of donations, and after Kickstarter took its cut we received $18,590.96. Next time I’ll tell you what our project has actually been doing. This […]

Member of the Band – Gorilla Gleb Oleinik

Friday, February 17, 18:20 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Gleb Oleinik

Black Hole Information - Still Lost

Friday, February 17, 12:37 UTC @ Backreaction

[Illustration of black hole.Image: NASA] According to Google, Stephen Hawking is the most famous physicist alive, and his most famous work is the black hole information paradox. If you know one thing about physics, therefore, that’s what you should know. Before Hawking, black holes weren’t paradoxical. Yes, if you throw a book into a black hole you can’t read it anymore. That’s because what

Black Hole Information - Still Lost

Friday, February 17, 12:37 UTC @ Backreaction

[Illustration of black hole.Image: NASA] According to Google, Stephen Hawking is the most famous physicist alive, and his most famous work is the black hole information paradox. If you know one thing about physics, therefore, that’s what you should know. Before Hawking, black holes weren’t paradoxical. Yes, if you throw a book into a black hole you can’t read it anymore. That’s because what

An unsuccessful attempt to use CairoSVG to generate small vector-graphics PDF files

Friday, February 17, 02:31 UTC @ 0xDE

The following image shows the onion layers of a 6 × 6 grid (see Sariel's post for context). It consists of 42 circles, 36 with a fill and a stroke and 6 with only a stroke. My usual workflow is to draw this sort of thing in Adobe Illustrator, but one drawback of doing things this way

Simulating seashells

Friday, February 17, 02:09 UTC @ John D. Cook

In 1838, Rev. Henry Moseley discovered that a large number of mollusk shells and other shells can be described using three parameters: k, T, and D. First imagine a thin wire running through the coil of the shell. In cylindrical coordinates, this wire follows the parameterization r = ekθ z = Tt If T = 0 this is a […]

A night to talk about redemption: TEDNYC Rebirth

Friday, February 17, 00:53 UTC @ TED Blog

How do we make sense of the tumult around us? How can we grapple with the confusion and alarm so many of us are feeling? In a special session of talks curated and hosted by Jon Ronson at TED HQ on Wednesday night, six speakers looked not at the ruin that follows hardship but the […]

How to Tame Quantum Weirdness

Thursday, February 16, 16:04 UTC @ mathematics – Quanta Magazine

Can balloon animals help blunt uneasy feelings about “spooky action at a distance”?

Announcing WWDC 2017

Thursday, February 16, 14:03 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Apple’s developer community will come together at WWDC 2017 in San Jose, California from June 5 to 9 to learn about the future of Apple platforms and connect with thousands of developers from all around the world. In addition to the activities planned for conference attendees, a variety of other exciting developer events will take place throughout the city. Learn more about WWDC.

★ Apple Moves WWDC Back to San Jose

Thursday, February 16, 13:44 UTC @ Daring Fireball

If a large corporation can be described as a homebody, Apple is it. And San Francisco is not Apple’s home turf.

New IBM research: Making silicon biochips to stretch single DNA for future disease detection

Thursday, February 16, 13:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Just last month, IBM released its “5 in 5” predictions, an exercise to identify five innovations that will have an impact on society in five years. Among the five, it was predicted that, with the help of IBM “lab-on-a-chip” technology, doctors could have a device that isolates tiny bioparticles from bodily fluids to reveal signs […] The post New IBM research: Making silicon biochips to stretc

Liberatus Wins at Poker

Thursday, February 16, 12:51 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Codesnippet Doclet 0.20 Release

Thursday, February 16, 10:40 UTC @ APIDesign - Blogs

Enhance your Javadoc with Codesnippet4Javadoc version 0.20 which now supports special "coloring" for strings and comments. --JaroslavTulach 10:40, 16 February 2017 (UTC)

Swift 4 Release Process

Thursday, February 16, 10:00 UTC @ Swift.org

This post describes the goals, release process, and estimated schedule for Swift 4. Swift 4 is a major release that is intended to be completed in the fall of 2017. It pivots around providing source stability for Swift 3 code while implementing essential feature work needed to achieve binary stability in the language. It will contain significant enhancements to the core language and Standard Library, especially in the generics system and a revamp of the String

Linkage

Thursday, February 16, 06:12 UTC @ 0xDE

Telemetry: Tessellated paper sculptures by Matthew Shlian (G+) Polygonal billiard paths, after the work of Iranian-American Fields medalist Maryam Mirzakhani (

★ Investment Bankers Urge Apple to Spend Money Hiring Investment Bankers, News at 11

Thursday, February 16, 02:07 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Apple’s Beats acquisition suggests the opposite of this article’s central thesis: Apple is better off not working with investment bankers even for a $3 billion deal.

Divide and conquer

Thursday, February 16, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

Divide and rule (or divide and conquer, from Latin dīvide et īmpera) in politics and sociology is gaining and maintaining power by breaking up larger concentrations of power into pieces that individually have less power than the one implementing the strategy. The concept refers to a strategy that breaks up existing power structures, and es

“Humanity can rise to the challenge”: Yuval Harari in conversation at TED Dialogues

Wednesday, February 15, 23:56 UTC @ TED Blog

How to explain the stunning political upheaval of 2016 — Brexit in the UK and Donald Trump’s election to the presidency in the US — as well as the current and ongoing atmosphere of division, discontent and disquiet that fills many people’s lives? One simple answer: “We’ve lost our story,” says Jerusalem University historian Yuval [

TED and Star India greenlight “TED Talks India: Nayi Soch” TV series, hosted by Shah Rukh Khan

Wednesday, February 15, 20:45 UTC @ TED Blog

Today we confirmed some exciting news about TED’s most ambitious television project yet: a major network series in India hosted by megawatt Bollywood film star Shah Rukh Khan. The program will air on Star India, one of India’s largest media conglomerates and our partner in production. TED Talks India: Nayi Soch, which translates to “new thinking,” marks

Developer Insights Series: Managing a Community

Wednesday, February 15, 19:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Super Evil Megacorp, the developer behind the mobile-first multiplayer game Vainglory, shares its approach to community management, and how it evolves the game by listening to player feedback. Learn more.

Watch: Yuval Harari in conversation with TED’s Chris Anderson

Wednesday, February 15, 18:05 UTC @ TED Blog

Watch: Chris Anderson speaks with the historian Yuval Noah Harari on what’s happening now, and what’s to come during this extraordinary moment in time -- when nationalism is pitted against globalism, while the world is facing a job-loss crisis most of us are not even expecting. A rewarding hour of big ideas about humanity's future.

‘Armchair archaeologists’ search 5 million tiles of Peru

Wednesday, February 15, 15:51 UTC @ TED Blog

GlobalXplorer, the citizen science platform for archaeology, launched two weeks ago. It’s the culmination of Sarah Parcak’s TED Prize wish and, already, more than 32,000 curious minds from around the world have started their training, learning to spot signs of ancient sites threatened by looters. Working together, the GlobalXplorer community has just finished searching the [

IBM scientists team with The Weather Company to bring edge computing to life

Wednesday, February 15, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Super Bowl LI was a historic day for the sport of football. It was also a historic day for technology. Picture this: wireless and cellular data consumed by fans at Super Bowl games has doubled every year for the last five years. According to Mobile Sports Report, Super Bowl LI broke the single-day wireless data […] The post IBM scientists team with The Weather Company to bring edge computing

Of Big Brains and Tiny Devices: Here Comes the Internet of the Body

Wednesday, February 15, 10:24 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

How does a gifted student in Switzerland in the 1980s apply his talents? On precision mechanics and watchmaking, of course. Before becoming the multifaceted scientist he is today, Bruno Michel started out as a watchmaking apprentice. But at the time the watch industry was facing a challenging period and its four-century dominance was coming to […] The post O

Complete bipartite polyhedra

Wednesday, February 15, 02:27 UTC @ 0xDE

The tetrahedron and the Császár polyhedron are polyhedra whose edges and vertices form complete graphs; it is unknown whether any others exist. At the tutorial session for Graph Drawing 2015, I asked whether there are any complete bipartite polyhedra. As the definition of non-convex polyhedra can be the subject of heated debate (check out Wikipedia:Talk:Polyhedron

Recreating the Vertigo poster

Wednesday, February 15, 02:22 UTC @ John D. Cook

In his new book The Perfect Shape, Øyvind Hammer shows how to create a graph something like the poster for Alfred Hitchcock’s movie Vertigo. Hammer’s code uses a statistical language called Past that I’d never heard of. Here’s my interpretation of his code using Python. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from numpy import arange, sin, cos, […]

Raymond Smullyan, 1919–2017

Tuesday, February 14, 23:31 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Serious work amid the puzzles and jokes. Amazon source When Raymond Smullyan was born, Emanuel Lasker was still the world chess champion. Indeed, of the 16 universally recognized champions, only the first, Wilhelm Steinitz, lived outside Smullyan’s lifetime. Smullyan passed away a week ago Monday at age 97. Today, Dick and I wish to add […]

photostream 105

Tuesday, February 14, 18:36 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Providence, RI

Java Flame Graphs Introduction: Fire For Everyone!

Tuesday, February 14, 17:14 UTC @ Psychosomatic, Lobotomy, Saw

FlameGraphs are sup

Realizing a barrier-free society

Tuesday, February 14, 17:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Field experiment at a busy shopping district in Tokyo Tokyo’s underground consists of miles of pedestrian walkways, extensive shopping arcades and a subway network. It stretches for hundreds of kilometers between more than 200 subway stations. Even with a map and a good sense of direction, it is not necessarily an easy place to navigate. […] The post Realizing a barrier-free society ap

Exclusive TV Shows on Apple Music

Tuesday, February 14, 15:18 UTC @ Joe's Blog

I have no problem with Apple making television shows. I know a lot of people consider it a distraction. What are they doing? Their software is full of bugs. This is not the core of what Apple is. Why is Eddy Cue running off and making TV shows in the midst of all these serious read more »

Raymond Smullyan: Logician, Recreational math writer, Philosopher, passed away

Monday, February 13, 18:45 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Raymond Smullyan was born on May 25 1919 and passed away recently at the age of 97. He was a logician (PhD from Princeton under Alonzo Church in 1959) who did serious, recreational, and philosophical work. I doubt he invented the truth-teller/liar/normals and knight/knave/Knormal problems, but he popularized them and (I suspect) pushed them further than anyone before him. He was active all of his life: His last book on Logic Puzzles, The Magic Garden of George B and other Log

Bliki: FunctionAsObject

Monday, February 13, 16:20 UTC @ Martin Fowler

In programming, the fundamental notion of an object is the bundling of data and behavior. This provides a common data context when writing a set of related functions. It also provides an interface to manipulating the data that allows the object to control access to that data, making it easy to support derived data and prevent invalid modifications of data. Many languages provide explicit syntax to define classes, which act as definitions for objects. But if you have a language with first-class functions

Interview about the Agile Manifesto

Monday, February 13, 16:18 UTC @ Martin Fowler

The agile uprising podcast has been doing a series of interviews with the authors of the agile manifesto. Here is my interview, where I reveal that I remember little of the event, but can describe a bit about the context of the time that led to it. We also talk a bit about how the agile world has developed since.

IBM & Warwick Image Highly Reactive Triangular Molecule for the First Time

Monday, February 13, 16:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Triangulene gets its first close up thanks to scientists from IBM and the University of Warwick Published today in Nature Nanotechnology, IBM scientists are truly making the invisible visible. A few weeks ago IBM released its annual five predictions for the next five years based on this theme. IBM scientists in Zurich are making a […] The post IBM 

/u/xcthulhu on What can Rust do for astrophysics?

Monday, February 13, 14:46 UTC @ gilded : rust

To me, the big advantage of Rust over C, C++ or Fortran is not its execution time, but its long-term maintainability and enforcement of good software engineering practices - and all that while not losing out on performance. Hey, I'm a software engineer for an exoplanet finding sattelite mission. I think the above is probably the #1 reason to use rust. A lot of the code we use is written in python, which has a lot of code quality

Swift Hashable

Monday, February 13, 11:09 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

I already covered making a custom Swift type Equatable and Comparable which allows us to test if an Array contains an instance of our type or to sort the array amongst other things. What if we want to store our type in a Set or Dictionary? Making Our Custom Type Hashable To use a type in a Set or Dictionary it has to be Hashable which mean

October-December 2016 Status Report

Monday, February 13, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

The October to December 2016 Status Report is now available.

From Prometheus to Sisyphus

Sunday, February 12, 17:23 UTC @ Adam Leventhal's blog

When Apple announced their new file system, APFS, in June, I hustled to be in the front row of the WWDC presentation, questions with the presenters, and then the open Q&A session. I took a week to write up my notes which turned into as 12 page behemoth of a blog post — longer than my college [...]

Away Note

Sunday, February 12, 07:26 UTC @ Backreaction

I'm traveling next week and will be offline for some days. Blogging may be insubstantial, if existent, and comments may be stuck in the queue longer than usual. But I'm sure you'll survive without me ;) And since you haven't seen the girls for a while, here is a recent photo. They'll be starting school this year in the fall and are very excited about it.

Away Note

Sunday, February 12, 07:26 UTC @ Backreaction

I'm traveling next week and will be offline for some days. Blogging may be insubstantial, if existent, and comments may be stuck in the queue longer than usual. But I'm sure you'll survive without me ;) And since you haven't seen the girls for a while, here is a recent photo. They'll be starting school this year in the fall and are very excited about it.

Inverse Fibonacci numbers

Saturday, February 11, 22:25 UTC @ John D. Cook

As with the previous post, this post is a spinoff of a blog post by Brian Hayes. He considers the problem of determining whether a number n is a Fibonacci number and links to a paper by Gessel that gives a very simple solution: A positive integer n is a Fibonacci number if and only if either 5n2 – […]

Approximate inverse of the gamma function

Saturday, February 11, 19:50 UTC @ John D. Cook

The other day I ran across a blog post by Brian Hayes that linked to an article by David Cantrell on how to compute the inverse of the gamma function. Cantrell gives an approximation in terms of the Lambert W function. In this post we’ll write a little Python code to kick the tires on […]

A personal memory of Hans Rosling, from TED’s founding director of video

Saturday, February 11, 04:59 UTC @ TED Blog

I was there when Hans Rosling first shook the room at TED, and transformed tiresome medical statistics into an action-packed, live performance about real people’s lives on the line. He’s since been namechecked by Bill Gates. And he outlasted Fidel Castro – twice. Not merely mortally. In an interview on the TED Blog, Hans recounts […]

/u/dylster3 on Safer microcontrollers almost here (Rust on AVR)

Saturday, February 11, 03:11 UTC @ gilded : rust

Thanks!

Member of the Band – Gorilla John Schuch

Friday, February 10, 16:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! John Schuch

New committer: Mahdi Mokhtari (ports)

Friday, February 10, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

★ On Apple’s Capital Return Program

Friday, February 10, 02:30 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Apple needs to do what it has always done. They need to invent their future, not buy it.

New Data from the Early Universe Does Not Rule Out Holography

Thursday, February 09, 18:10 UTC @ Backreaction

[img src: entdeckungen.net] It’s string theorists’ most celebrated insight: The world is a hologram. Like everything else string theorists have come up with, it’s an untested hypothesis. But now, it’s been put to test with a new analysis that compares a holographic early universe with its non-holographic counterpart. Tl;dr: Results are inconclusive. When string theorists say we live in a

New Data from the Early Universe Does Not Rule Out Holography

Thursday, February 09, 18:10 UTC @ Backreaction

[img src: entdeckungen.net] It’s string theorists’ most celebrated insight: The world is a hologram. Like everything else string theorists have come up with, it’s an untested hypothesis. But now, it’s been put to test with a new analysis that compares a holographic early universe with its non-holographic counterpart. Tl;dr: Results are inconclusive. When string theorists say we live in a

A Fight to Fix Geometry’s Foundations

Thursday, February 09, 16:34 UTC @ mathematics – Quanta Magazine

When two mathematicians raised pointed questions about a classic proof that no one really understood, they ignited a years-long debate about how much could be trusted in a new kind of geometry.

A cognitive in-car companion to help us enjoy the journey

Thursday, February 09, 16:22 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In Dublin, scientists from IBM Research – Ireland and University College Dublin (UCD) are developing and testing a Cognitive In-Car Companion as part of an EU H2020 / ECSEL co-funded project called ENABLE-S3 – an effort to accelerate the validation and application of highly automated systems in several domains, including automotive. The Irish use case […] The post

The Dichotomy Conjecture

Thursday, February 09, 12:11 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Arash Rafiey, Jeff Kinne and Tomás Feder settle the Feder-Vardi dichotomy conjecture in their paper Dichotomy for Digraph Homomorphism Problems. Jeff Kinne is my academic grandchild--how quickly they grow up. Keep in mind the usual caveat that this work has not yet been fully refereed and vetted by the community, though there is no reason to think it won't be (though some skepticism in the

Improving Healthcare in China with Cognitive Analytics

Thursday, February 09, 07:01 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

With the world’s largest population, China generates an unprecedented amount of medical data. It’s an ideal harvest ground for the development and application of cognitive solutions that extract insights from data to improve medical management. The landscape of Chinese healthcare has undergone huge transformation over the past 20 years. The digitization of medical records resulted […] The post

A Sorted Array Implementation in Swift

Wednesday, February 08, 19:40 UTC @ Ole Begemann

In last weekʼs Swift Talk episode, Florian and Chris wrote a SortedArray type: an array that keeps its elements sorted according to a given sort predicate at all times. This is great because it encodes one more invariant in the type system — clients that use this type in place of a regular

“I cried as you told your story”: Comment of the week, Feb. 8, 2017

Wednesday, February 08, 17:50 UTC @ TED Blog

This week’s comment was posted on Sue Klebold’s talk, “My son was a Columbine shooter. This is my story.” Many times, a comment section represents the worst of our collective thoughts, but in this instance, on this platform, there is so much compassion. I was impressed with the level of respect and understanding shown to Sue […]

Introduction to Word Embeddings

Wednesday, February 08, 16:12 UTC @ Terra Incognita

Just publised a deck of slides for an Introduction to Word Embeddings, presented at our Machine Learning Meetup in Porto Alegre / RS / Brazil. Here is the video (in Portugese):

Clarke Ching – AMA | Making Tricky Concepts Sticky| 23 Feb

Wednesday, February 08, 14:08 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Have you heard the Agile Parable? Do you want to explain tricky concepts and make them sticky? Find out how with Clarke Ching, Agile Lead at Royal London. Clarke Ching is an expert in Eli Goldratt’s Theory of Constraints and  author of ‘Rolling Rocks Downhill’, an Agile business novel that never mentions Agile and, ‘Rocks into Gold […] The post Clarke Ching –

Gary Byers is stepping back from CCL and Clozure

Wednesday, February 08, 14:07 UTC @ Zach Beane Common Lisp

Here’s a message from Andrew Shalit to openmcl-devel: To the CCL Community - As many of you know, Gary Byers has been on a leave of absence from his Clozure CL work to attend to his health. I’m writing to let you know that, unfortunately, this leave will be permanent. Gary has resigned from his position at Clozure and will no longer be the lead developer of Clozure CL. Over the

How efficient is Morse code?

Wednesday, February 08, 14:01 UTC @ John D. Cook

Morse code was designed so that the most frequently used letters have the shortest codes. In general, code length increases as frequency decreases. How efficient is Morse code? We’ll compare letter frequencies based on Google’s research with the length of each code, and make the standard assumption that a dash is three times as long as a dot. […]

New committer: Tobias Kortkamp (ports)

Wednesday, February 08, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

Tidying up trivial details

Tuesday, February 07, 18:02 UTC @ John D. Cook

The following quote gives a good description of the value of abstract mathematics. The quote speaks specifically of “universal algebra,” but consistent with the spirit of the quote you could generalize it to other areas of mathematics, especially areas such as category theory. Universal algebra is the study of features common to familiar algebraic systems […]

Presented Today at IEEE Conference: Making 5G a Reality

Tuesday, February 07, 16:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

When Bodhisatwa (Bodhi) Sadhu was starting out his undergraduate degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering at BITS Pilani in India in 2003, students would have to wait in line 30 minutes or more to make calls home on one of the two landline phones on campus. By the time he graduated in 2007, everyone had […] The post Presented Today at IEEE Conference: Making 5G

Why String.CharacterView is not a MutableCollection

Tuesday, February 07, 14:48 UTC @ Ole Begemann

In the previous article I discussed why Set and Dictionary donʼt conform to MutableCollection and RangeReplaceableCollection. Today Iʼd like to do the same for String.CharacterView. CharacterView does conform to

What do you mean by “Event-Driven”

Tuesday, February 07, 14:02 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Towards the end of last year I attended a workshop with my colleagues in ThoughtWorks to discuss the nature of “event-driven” applications. Over the last few years we've been building lots of systems that make a lot of use of events, and they've been often praised, and often damned. Our North American office organized a summit, and ThoughtWorks senior developers from all over the world showed up to share ideas. The biggest outcome of the summit was recognizing that when people talk a

SRE's review of Democracy

Tuesday, February 07, 02:37 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

Day One We've been handed this old legacy system called "Democracy". It's an emergency. Old maintainers are saying it's misbehaving lately but they have no idea how to fix it. We've had a meeting with them to find out as much as possible about the system but it turns out that all the original team members have left the company long time ago and that the current team doesn't have much understanding of the system beyond some basic operational knowle

Being a Mutable Collection is not Sufficient to be a MutableCollection

Monday, February 06, 21:44 UTC @ Ole Begemann

The Collection protocol is the basis for collections in Swift. In addition to Collection, the standard library provides four protocols that collections can adopt to document additional capabilities. These protocols refine Collection — any type that conforms to one of them must also conform to Collection.

Measuring graph robustness

Monday, February 06, 17:06 UTC @ John D. Cook

There are a couple ways to measure how well a graph remains connected when nodes are removed. One ways is to consider nodes dropping out randomly. Another way, the one we look at here, assumes an adversary is trying to remove the most well-connected nodes. This approach was defined by Schneider et al [1]. It […]

IBM Scientists Measure Heat-Transfer through Single Atoms

Monday, February 06, 16:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Published today, using a technique which looks like trampoline, IBM scientists have measured the thermal conductance of metallic quantum point contacts made of gold down to the single-atom level at room temperature for the first time. As everything scales to the nanoscale, heat – more precisely, the loss of it – becomes an issue in […] The post IBM Scientists

Few thoughts on current political situation

Monday, February 06, 10:12 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

[[div style="width:50em"]] by martin_sustrik

The Hardness of Reals Hierarchy

Monday, February 06, 04:44 UTC @ Computational Complexity

In my last post (here) I defined the following hierarchy (which I am sure is not original- if someone has a source please leave a comment on it) Z_d[x] is the set of polys of degree d over Z (the integers) ALG_d is the set of roots of these polys. ALG_1 = Q (The rationals) Given a real alpha I think of its complexity as being the least d such that alpha i

Saving Climate Data (Part 5)

Monday, February 06, 02:15 UTC @ Azimuth

There’s a lot going on! Here’s a news roundup. I will separately talk about what the Azimuth Climate Data Backup Project is doing. I’ll start with the bad news, and then go on to some good news. Tweaking the EPA website Scientists are keeping track of how Trump administration is changing the Environmental Protection Agency […]

New Workshops + Early Bird Tickets

Monday, February 06, 00:00 UTC @ objc.io

Our Advanced Swift workshop has been a great success. Our attendees love learning in a small group, with most time spent doing hands-on exercises. Therefore, we decided to organize more workshops this year. We decided to broaden our range of topics, and will provide workshops on Performant Core Data (March 31), Lighter View Controllers (April 28), Generic UIKit (May 17) and Advanced Swift (June 30). Check out our workshops page for the details. <

MartianCraft Smart Mirror Project—Part 2: Software

Monday, February 06, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Recap Last week I wrote about how I ended up building the hardware side of an iOS-supported smart mirror, from planning the frame to purchasing the materials and - most importantly - the mirror. The completed mirror sitting on my desk. The app uses completely localised time format, day names and temper

Data-driven charity

Sunday, February 05, 22:03 UTC @ John D. Cook

In this post I interview GiveDirectly co-founder Paul Niehaus about charitable direct cash transfers and their empirical approach to charity. JC: Can you start off by telling us a little bit about Give Directly, and what you do? PN: GiveDirectly is the first nonprofit that lets individual donors like you and me send money directly to […]

A Panel On P vs. NP

Sunday, February 05, 17:38 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

A discussion on the famous problem William Agnew is the chairperson of the Georgia Tech Theoretical Computer Science Club. He is, of course, an undergraduate at Tech with a multitude of interests—all related to computer science. Today I want to report on a panel that we had the other night on the famous P vs. […]

How Trump’s Support Erodes

Sunday, February 05, 00:25 UTC @ inessential.com

Even Trump’s supporters know he’s not a good and competent man — nevertheless, they think they can get what they want from him. It’s a cynical deal, and bad, but you can understand it. Trump’s vagueness and flip-flops, and the suggestion that he not be taken literally, all help him with this: his supporters, who don’t all want the same things, see what they want to see. Many Republicans wanted a corporatist to replace Scalia on the Supreme Court, so that decisions like Roe v.

An In-Character Programme

Friday, February 03, 23:40 UTC @ Amy Worrall's Blog

Last summer, I was producer for Grosvenor Light Opera Company’s production of Pirates of Penzance. For those that don’t know, most of the female roles in the play comprise Major-General Stanley’s adopted daughters.

Member of the Band – Gorilla Rolando Lázcares

Friday, February 03, 18:33 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Rolando Lázcares

Testing Quantum Foundations With Atomic Clocks

Friday, February 03, 13:10 UTC @ Backreaction

Funky clock at Aachen University. Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg has recently drawn attention by disliking quantum mechanics. Besides an article for The New York Review of Books and a public lecture to bemoan how unsatisfactory the current situation is, he has, however, also written a technical paper: Lindblad Decoherence in Atomic Clocks Steven Weinberg Phys. Rev. A 94, 042117 (2016) arXiv:

Testing Quantum Foundations With Atomic Clocks

Friday, February 03, 13:10 UTC @ Backreaction

Funky clock at Aachen University. Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg has recently drawn attention by disliking quantum mechanics. Besides an article for The New York Review of Books and a public lecture to bemoan how unsatisfactory the current situation is, he has, however, also written a technical paper: Lindblad Decoherence in Atomic Clocks Steven Weinberg Phys. Rev. A 94, 042117 (2016) arXiv:

iPad Identity Crisis

Friday, February 03, 03:40 UTC @ Joe's Blog

“As long as we keep ping-ponging between iPhone and Mac, iPad will continue to be stuck in between them, never quite better than one or the other.” —Me, May 22, 2015 I said that a year-and-a-half ago, and it’s still true. I stopped thinking of iPad as a replacement for anything a long time ago. read more »

Big data and the law

Thursday, February 02, 22:25 UTC @ John D. Cook

Excerpt from the new book Big Data of Complex Networks: Big Data and data protection law provide for a number of mutual conflicts: from the perspective of Big Data analytics, a strict application of data protection law as we know it today would set an immediate end to most Big Data applications. From the perspective of […]

We Are All Iranians

Thursday, February 02, 19:15 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Updated Certificate for Game Center Authentication

Thursday, February 02, 00:50 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

On February 13, 2017, a new certificate for server-based Game Center Player ID verification will be available via the publicKeyUrl property of generateIdentityVerificationSignature, and the previous certificate will expire.Apps that dynamically query the publicKeyUrl value will automatically use the new certificate, whereas apps that cache the certificate or hardcode the certificate URL may require an update. Learn more.

IBM Research Teams up with Swiss University to Launch Degree in Cyber-Physical and Embedded Systems

Wednesday, February 01, 09:39 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Cyber-physical systems are embedded computational devices directly interacting with the physical world. They are present all around us: at home, at work, in the environment. Cyber-physical and embedded systems support the Internet of Things and provide backbone technologies for smart homes and cities, smart grids, intelligent transportation systems and healthcare – and this is only […] The post

The fine print in the ICFP 2017 call for papers

Wednesday, February 01, 02:50 UTC @ composition.al

This year, I’m excited to be serving on the program committee for ICFP, the annual academic conference on the theory and practice of functional programming. This will be my first time on ICFP’s program committee.1 I’m also continuing my term as the publicity chair for ICFP. The deadli

Information Geometry (Part 16)

Wednesday, February 01, 01:18 UTC @ Azimuth

This week I’m giving a talk on biology and information: • John Baez, Biology as information dynamics, talk for Biological Complexity: Can it be Quantified?, a workshop at the Beyond Center, 2 February 2017. While preparing this talk, I discovered a cool fact. I doubt it’s new, but I haven’t exactly seen it elsewhere. I […]