Gossip in a Smartphone Peer-to-Peer Network. (arXiv:1705.09609v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this paper, we study the fundamental problem of gossip in the mobile telephone model: a recently introduced variation of the classical telephone model modified to better describe the local peer-to-peer communication services implemented in many popular smartphone operating systems. In more detail, the mobile telephone model differs from the classical telephone model in three ways: (1) each device can participate in at most one connection per round; (2) the network topology can undergo a parameterized

Approximating Constrained Minimum Cost Input-Output Selection for Generic Arbitrary Pole Placement in Structured Systems. (arXiv:1705.09600v1 [math.OC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

This paper is about minimum cost constrained selection of inputs and outputs for generic arbitrary pole placement. The input-output set is constrained in the sense that the set of states that each input can influence and the set of states that each output can sense is pre-specified. Our goal is to optimally select an input-output set that the system has no structurally fixed modes. Polynomial algorithms do not exist for solving this problem unless P=NP. To this end, we propose an approximation algorithm

A Quantum Approach to the Unique Sink Orientation Problem. (arXiv:1605.03266v2 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We consider quantum algorithms for the unique sink orientation problem on cubes. This problem is widely considered to be of intermediate computational complexity. This is because there no known polynomial algorithm (classical or quantum) from the problem and yet it arrises as part of a series of problems for which it being intractable would imply complexity theoretic collapses. We give a reduction which proves that if one can efficiently evaluate the kth power of the unique sink orientation outmap, then

Fast, Responsive Decentralised Graph Colouring. (arXiv:1405.6987v3 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We solve, in a fully decentralised way (\ie with no message passing), the classic problem of colouring a graph. We propose a novel algorithm that is automatically responsive to topology changes, and we prove that it converges quickly to a proper colouring in $O(N\log{N})$ time with high probability for generic graphs (and in $O(\log{N})$ time if $\Delta=o(1)$) when the number of available colours is greater than $\Delta$, the maximum degree of the graph. We believe the proof techniques used in th

Efficient Construction of Probabilistic Tree Embeddings. (arXiv:1605.04651v4 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

In this paper we describe an algorithm that embeds a graph metric $(V,d_G)$ on an undirected weighted graph $G=(V,E)$ into a distribution of tree metrics $(T,D_T)$ such that for every pair $u,v\in V$, $d_G(u,v)\leq d_T(u,v)$ and ${\bf{E}}_{T}[d_T(u,v)]\leq O(\log n)\cdot d_G(u,v)$. Such embeddings have proved highly useful in designing fast approximation algorithms, as many hard problems on graphs are easy to solve on tree instances. For a graph with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges, our algorithm runs in $O(m

Duel and sweep algorithm for order-preserving pattern matching. (arXiv:1705.09438v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Given a text $T$ and a pattern $P$ over alphabet $\Sigma$, the classic exact matching problem searches for all occurrences of pattern $P$ in text $T$. Unlike exact matching problem, order-preserving pattern matching (OPPM) considers the relative order of elements, rather than their real values. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm for OPPM problem using the "duel-and-sweep" paradigm. Our algorithm runs in $O(n + m\log m)$ time in general and $O(n + m)$ time under an assumption that the charac

The border support rank of two-by-two matrix multiplication is seven. (arXiv:1705.09652v1 [cs.CC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

We show that the border support rank of the tensor corresponding to two-by-two matrix multiplication is seven over the complex numbers. We do this by constructing two polynomials that vanish on all complex tensors with format four-by-four-by-four and border rank at most six, but that do not vanish simultaneously on any tensor with the same support as the two-by-two matrix multiplication tensor. This extends the work of Hauenstein, Ikenmeyer, and Landsberg. We also give two proofs that the support rank of

On Two LZ78-style Grammars: Compression Bounds and Compressed-Space Computation. (arXiv:1705.09538v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

We investigate two closely related LZ78-based compression schemes: LZMW (an old scheme by Miller and Wegman) and LZD (a recent variant by Goto et al.). Both LZD and LZMW naturally produce a grammar for a string of length $n$; we show that the size of this grammar can be larger than the size of the smallest grammar by a factor $\Omega(n^{\frac{1}3})$ but is always smaller by a factor $O((\frac{n}{\log n})^{\frac{2}{3}})$. In addition, we show that the standard algorithms using $\Theta(z)$ working space to

Faster Population Counts Using AVX2 Instructions. (arXiv:1611.07612v7 [cs.DS] UPDATED)

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Counting the number of ones in a binary stream is a common operation in database, information-retrieval, cryptographic and machine-learning applications. Most processors have dedicated instructions to count the number of ones in a word (e.g., popcnt on x64 processors). Maybe surprisingly, we show that a vectorized approach using SIMD instructions can be twice as fast as using the dedicated instructions on recent Intel processors. The benefits can be even greater for applications such as similarity measur

Overcommitment in Cloud Services -- Bin packing with Chance Constraints. (arXiv:1705.09335v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

This paper considers a traditional problem of resource allocation, scheduling jobs on machines. One such recent application is cloud computing, where jobs arrive in an online fashion with capacity requirements and need to be immediately scheduled on physical machines in data centers. It is often observed that the requested capacities are not fully utilized, hence offering an opportunity to employ an overcommitment policy, i.e., selling resources beyond capacity. Setting the right overcommitment level can

New Variants of Pattern Matching with Constants and Variables. (arXiv:1705.09504v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Given a text and a pattern over two types of symbols called constants and variables, the parameterized pattern matching problem is to find all occurrences of substrings of the text that the pattern matches by substituting a variable in the text for each variable in the pattern, where the substitution should be injective. The function matching problem is a variant of it that lifts the injection constraint. In this paper, we discuss variants of those problems, where one can substitute a constant or a varia

Voronoi Cells of Lattices with Respect to Arbitrary Norms. (arXiv:1512.00720v3 [math.MG] UPDATED)

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

Motivated by the deterministic single exponential time algorithm of Micciancio and Voulgaris for solving the shortest and closest vector problem for the Euclidean norm, we study the geometry and complexity of Voronoi cells of lattices with respect to arbitrary norms. On the positive side, we show that for strictly convex and smooth norms the geometry of Voronoi cells of lattices in any dimension is similar to the Euclidean case, i.e., the Voronoi cells are defined by the so-called Voronoi-relevant vector

Inapproximability of VC Dimension and Littlestone's Dimension. (arXiv:1705.09517v1 [cs.CC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

We study the complexity of computing the VC Dimension and Littlestone's Dimension. Given an explicit description of a finite universe and a concept class (a binary matrix whose $(x,C)$-th entry is $1$ iff element $x$ belongs to concept $C$), both can be computed exactly in quasi-polynomial time ($n^{O(\log n)}$). Assuming the randomized Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH), we prove nearly matching lower bounds on the running time, that hold even for approximation algorithms.

Range Assignment of Base-Stations Maximizing Coverage Area without Interference. (arXiv:1705.09346v1 [cs.CG])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CG updates on arXiv.org

This note is a study on the problem of assigning non-overlapping disks centered at a set of given points in ${\IR}^2$ such that the sum of area covered by them is maximized. If the points are placed on a straight-line, then the problem is solvable in polynomial time. However, the problem is shown to be NP-hard in ${\IR}^2$. Eppstein [CCCG, pages 260--265, 2016] proposed a polynomial time algorithm for maximizing the sum of radii (or perimeter) of non-overlapping balls or disks when the points are arbitra

Distributed Dominating Set Approximations beyond Planar Graphs. (arXiv:1705.09617v1 [cs.DC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

The Minimum Dominating Set (MDS) problem is one of the most fundamental and challenging problems in distributed computing. While it is well-known that minimum dominating sets cannot be approximated locally on general graphs, over the last years, there has been much progress on computing local approximations on sparse graphs, and in particular planar graphs. In this paper we study distributed and deterministic MDS approximation algorithms for graph classes beyond planar graphs. In particular, we s

Multiresolution Priority Queues. (arXiv:1705.09642v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Priority queues are container data structures essential to many high performance computing (HPC) applications. In this paper, we introduce multiresolution priority queues, a data structure that improves the performance of the standard heap based implementations by trading off a controllable amount of resolution in the space of priorities. The new data structure can reduce the worst case performance of inserting an element from O(log(n)) to O(log(r)), where n is the number of elements in the queue and r i

Near-linear time approximation algorithms for optimal transport via Sinkhorn iteration. (arXiv:1705.09634v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Computing optimal transport distances such as the earth mover's distance is a fundamental problem in machine learning, statistics, and computer vision. Despite the recent introduction of several algorithms with good empirical performance, it is unknown whether general optimal transport distances can be approximated in near-linear time. This paper demonstrates that this ambitious goal is in fact achieved by Cuturi's Sinkhorn Distances, and provides guidance towards parameter tuning for this algorithm. Thi

Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product. (arXiv:1705.09379v1 [math.AC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.CC updates on arXiv.org

The tensor rank of a tensor is the smallest number r such that the tensor can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an l-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k + l)-tensor (not to be confused with the "tensor Kronecker product" used in algebraic complexity theory, which multiplies two k-tensors to get a k-tensor). Tensor rank is sub-multiplicative under the tensor product. We revisit the connection between restrictions and degenerations. It is well-known that

A greedy approximation algorithm for the minimum (2,2)-connected dominating set problem. (arXiv:1705.09643v1 [cs.DS])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

Using a connected dominating set (CDS) to serve as the virtual backbone of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is an effective way to save energy and reduce the impact of broadcasting storms. Since nodes may fail due to accidental damage or energy depletion, it is desirable that the virtual backbone is fault tolerant. This could be modeled as a k-connected, m-fold dominating set ((k,m)-CDS). Given a virtual undirected network G=(V,E), a subset C\subset V is a (k,m)-CDS of G if (i) G[C], the subgraph of G ind

Shared Memory Parallel Subgraph Enumeration. (arXiv:1705.09358v1 [cs.DC])

Monday, May 29, 01:30 UTC @ cs.DS updates on arXiv.org

The subgraph enumeration problem asks us to find all subgraphs of a target graph that are isomorphic to a given pattern graph. Determining whether even one such isomorphic subgraph exists is NP-complete---and therefore finding all such subgraphs (if they exist) is a time-consuming task. Subgraph enumeration has applications in many fields, including biochemistry and social networks, and interestingly the fastest algorithms for solving the problem for biochemical inputs are sequential. Since they depend o

Comments of the Week #162: from singularity evaporation to the loss of Earth’s helium

Monday, May 29, 00:51 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“The ability to listen and learn is key to mastering the art of communication. If you don’t use your verbal skills and networking, it will disappear rapidly.” -Rick Pitino It’s been a week full of amazing and controversial stories about the Universe here at Starts With A Bang! Did you catch the fantastic live event on Wednesday at…

A sixth sense for category theory

Sunday, May 28, 13:24 UTC @ John D. Cook

From Paul Phillips: I see adjoint functors. How often do you see them? All the time. They’re everywhere. pic.twitter.com/6PkGJ9wP4A — Paul Phillips (@contrarivariant) May 27, 2017 Mashup of Saunders Mac Lane’s quip “Adjoint functors arise everywhere” and Haley Joel Osment’s famous line from Sixth Sense. Related: Applied category theory

A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming (2010) [pdf]

Sunday, May 28, 09:29 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 207# Comments: 19

Patrick Stein: Fog of Light - Starting to Add Star-Fields

Sunday, May 28, 05:49 UTC @ Planet Lisp

I have finally written my first OpenGL code using GLSL. Whew. That took way too long to get all working correctly. I promise, soon, I will upload some sample code so that others may not have to stumble as long as I did. For the star-field, I generate a few thousand 2-D points. Each point has its own radius, its own opacity, and its own color. I put these all into an OpenGL array buffer. Then, the vertex shader copies data out of my struct to set the color and the point size. Then, the f

The Talk Show: ‘He Ends Up Fighting Hervé Villechaize’

Sunday, May 28, 00:14 UTC @ Daring Fireball

New episode of America’s favorite 3-star podcast, with special guest Jim Dalrymple. We speculate about what Apple might announce at WWDC 2017: Apple Watch, iPad, iOS, updated MacBooks, Apple TV, and more. Also: a celebration of the great Roger Moore. Brought to you by these great sponsors: MailRoute: Hosted spam and virus protection for email. Use this link for 10 percent off for the life of your account.

View Counting at Reddit

Saturday, May 27, 18:13 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 431# Comments: 106

Reseña: “El frío absoluto” de Bruno Juliá Díaz

Saturday, May 27, 18:09 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

“¿Cuánto es lo máximo que podemos enfriar? [En] este breve [libro] revisamos primero los avances de los pioneros para después acercarnos a las fronteras actuales de la ciencia donde el frío casi absoluto es protagonista indiscutible. Estas incluyen desde […] Leer más

Blockchains from the ground up: Part 1

Saturday, May 27, 16:18 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 268# Comments: 32

Ask Ethan: What Does The Edge Of The Universe Look Like? (Synopsis)

Saturday, May 27, 14:27 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“The Edge… there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.” -Hunter S. Thompson When we look at the nearby Universe, it looks a lot like we, ourselves, appear. Nearby galaxies are similar in structure to our own; the…

How do we get more subscribers, followers, and signups?

Saturday, May 27, 14:01 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

A Year of Google and Apple Maps

Saturday, May 27, 13:09 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 387# Comments: 105

British Airways: All flights cancelled amid IT crash

Saturday, May 27, 12:42 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 269# Comments: 225

What's the difference between the com and exe extensions? (2008)

Saturday, May 27, 12:19 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 237# Comments: 82

Too many prisons make people worse

Saturday, May 27, 10:54 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 338# Comments: 221

How Bayesian Inference Works (2016)

Saturday, May 27, 10:37 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 253# Comments: 34

Zach Beane: Roger Corman talk in the Bay Area

Saturday, May 27, 09:34 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Roger Corman talk in the Bay Area

Podcast CB S&R 112: El misterio de la estrella de Tabby

Saturday, May 27, 09:28 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

No he participado en el episodio 112 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Especial Estrella de Tabby”, 26 May 2017. Sin embargo, te lo recomiendo de forma encarecida. El equipo de Coffee Break ha observado […] Leer más

AlphaGo's next move

Saturday, May 27, 08:12 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 272# Comments: 158

«Conspiraciones y ciencia defectuosa» en el Cuaderno de Cultura Científica

Saturday, May 27, 08:00 UTC @ brucknerite

¿Existen las conspiraciones? ¡Preguntad por Julio César, por las tabaqueras o por los casos aislados de corrupción en política! Desde que Homo sapiens es Homo sapiens grupos de al menos dos personas han estado reuniéndose para planear actos en secreto —los grupos de uno, también llamados «personas solas», no pueden conspirar etimológicamente hablando: solo pueden …

Washington Post: ‘Google Now Knows When Its Users Go to the Store and Buy Stuff’

Saturday, May 27, 00:38 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Elizabeth Dwoskin and Craig Timberg, writing for The Washington Post: Google has begun using billions of credit-card transaction records to prove that its online ads are prompting people to make purchases — even when they happen offline in brick-and-mortar stores, the company said Tuesday. The advance allows Google to determine how many sales have been generated by digital ad campaigns, a goal that industry insiders have long described as “the holy grail” of online ad

Video Analysis of Erdogan's security detail brawl in Washington

Friday, May 26, 22:35 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL:

PostmarketOS: Aiming for a 10 year life-cycle for smartphones

Friday, May 26, 21:12 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 456# Comments: 195

Apple Is Working on a Dedicated Chip to Power AI on Devices

Friday, May 26, 20:05 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 290# Comments: 116

“App: The Human Story” Screening in San Jose

Friday, May 26, 19:57 UTC @ inessential.com

Here’s the scoop. It’s Sunday, June 4 at 5 pm. There’s a panel afterward with a bunch of people from the movie (including me). You can get tickets. You should get tickets — the event benefits App Camp for Girls.

Yoink

Friday, May 26, 19:44 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Yoink is a terrific utility for MacOS by Matthias Gansrigler. It gives you a shelf at the side of your screen where you can drop files (or clippings, like URLs or text snippets). Think of it as a place to park drag-and-drop items temporarily, while you switch apps or whatever. Cheap too: just $7 (here it is in the Mac App Store). Be sure to check out

AMD Announces Ryzen Update: Enables Memory Clocks Up to DDR4-4000

Friday, May 26, 19:27 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 232# Comments: 76

How to Report a Bug to Microsoft

Friday, May 26, 19:23 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 393# Comments: 110

El sesgo de género en los artículos científicos de Astronomía

Friday, May 26, 17:16 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Un estudio bibliométrico muestra un claro sesgo de género en los artículos de Astronomía. Los artículos científicos cuyo primer autor es una mujer reciben un (10,4 ± 0,9) % menos citas que si es un hombre. El análisis ha […] Leer más

Declassified memos show FBI illegally shared spy data with private parties

Friday, May 26, 17:03 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 220# Comments: 55

Resolving Modern Mac Alias Files

Friday, May 26, 16:54 UTC @ Indie Stack

When a user selects a file in the Mac Finder and chooses File -> Make Alias, the resulting “copy” is a kind of smart reference to the original. It is similar to a POSIX symbolic link, but whereas a symbolic link references the original by full path, an alias has historically stored additional information about … Continue reading Resolving Modern Mac Alias Files

UIDebuggingInformationOverlay

Friday, May 26, 16:32 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 211# Comments: 23

Member of the Band – Gorilla Andrés Arcia

Friday, May 26, 15:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Andrés Arcia

How to build your own VPN if you're wary of commercial options

Friday, May 26, 14:19 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 251# Comments: 101

The World Is Wasting Our Irreplaceable Helium, And Nobody Cares (Synopsis)

Friday, May 26, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“Oh Beautiful for smoggy skies, insecticided grain, For strip-mined mountain’s majesty above the asphalt plain. America, America, man sheds his waste on thee, And hides the pines with billboard signs, from sea to oily sea.” -George Carlin When you think of helium, you very likely think of balloons, birthday parties, and blimps. But this inert,…

The Software Business in 2017

Friday, May 26, 12:50 UTC @ Business of Software USA

This is a very interesting slide deck considering the software business and the long term future of the software industry. Two particularly useful sections: The five forces accelerating software’s growth. Considerations for the modern software CEO. Well worth looking through. Software 2017 – Where are we now and where are we going?  The post The Software Business in 2017 appeared first o

Can we probe the quantization of the black hole horizon with gravitational waves?

Friday, May 26, 12:09 UTC @ Backreaction

Tl;dr: Yes, but the testable cases aren’t the most plausible ones. It’s the year 2017, but we still don’t know how space and time get along with quantum mechanics. The best clue so far comes from Stephen Hawking and Jacob Bekenstein. They made one of the most surprising finds that theoretical physics saw in the 20th century: Black holes have entropy. It was a surprise because entropy is a

Can we probe the quantization of the black hole horizon with gravitational waves?

Friday, May 26, 12:09 UTC @ Backreaction

Tl;dr: Yes, but the testable cases aren’t the most plausible ones. It’s the year 2017, but we still don’t know how space and time get along with quantum mechanics. The best clue so far comes from Stephen Hawking and Jacob Bekenstein. They made one of the most surprising finds that theoretical physics saw in the 20th century: Black holes have entropy. It was a surprise because entropy is a

Facebook's tentacles reach further than people think

Friday, May 26, 08:52 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: http://... URL: https://... 479# Comments: 261

NTFS bug lets anyone hang or crash Windows 7 or 8.1

Friday, May 26, 08:27 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 282# Comments: 98

Linux Inside – How the Linux Kernel Works

Friday, May 26, 07:53 UTC @ Hacker News: Newest

Article URL: https://... URL: https://... 431# Comments: 20

Mossberg: The Disappearing Computer

Friday, May 26, 03:56 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Walt Mossberg: This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode — the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I’ve been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at the Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I’ve been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate — and sometimes to fulminate — about their creations. Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stret

Upping the microservices game with Istio: A microservice mesh

Thursday, May 25, 21:21 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In June last year I reported here the open sourcing of Amalgam8 – a microservice fabric first to provide a central control over layer 7 routing across a mesh of microservices that constitutes a cloud app. The value of Amalgam8 is in removing the burden and complexity of integrating the smaller microservices that comprise an […] The post Upping the microservices game with Istio: A microservice mesh appea

Go first

Thursday, May 25, 18:21 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Imperative Functional Programs that Explain their Work

Thursday, May 25, 17:58 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Imperative Functional Programs that Explain their Work Wilmer Ricciotti, Jan Stolarek, Roly Perera, James Cheney submitted on arXiv on 22 May 2017 Program slicing provides explanations that illustrate how program outputs were produced from inputs. We build on an approach introduced in prior work by Perera et al., where dynamic slicing was defined for pure higher-order functiona

Nick Murray on Alcantara: ‘It’s Garbage’

Thursday, May 25, 17:03 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Interesting video by Nick Murray, discussing the merits of Alcantara, the synthetic suede-like product that Microsoft has used for their new Surface Laptop. Murray is coming from the perspective of Alcantara’s use in cars, not laptops, but he says it wears terribly on things you touch, like steering wheels and gear shifters, losing all its softness after just a few thousan

Trump’s NASA Budget Eliminates Education Office, Plunging America Into The Dark (Synopsis)

Thursday, May 25, 15:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“First Rate People hire first rate people. Second rate people hire third rate people.” -Hermann Weyl So, here we are, encountering one another on the internet. There’s a really good chance that this is because you have some interest in space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, or some related area. Although I am an astrophysicist with a…

How to: Customize meeting titles from your AI assistants

Thursday, May 25, 14:51 UTC @ x.ai

What’s in a name? A ton of data. Your AI assistants Amy and Andrew automatically title the meetings they set up for you to give you as much information as … View Article The post How to: Customize meeting titles from your AI assistants appeared first on x.ai.

Journey to the Birth of the Solar System

Thursday, May 25, 14:27 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Join David Kaplan on a virtual-reality tour showing how the sun, the Earth and the other planets came to be.

Graduation from the Other Side

Thursday, May 25, 12:31 UTC @ Computational Complexity

BoS Europe Scholarships Announced

Thursday, May 25, 10:34 UTC @ Business of Software USA

We had some fantastic applications for the scholarship places, and we’re delighted to announce that the BoS Europe 2017 scholars are: Sam Heter – Hoopfix Lucy Friedman – Switchmetrics Theo England – Cucumber Faisal Chohan – Cogilent Mohammed Al Rasbi – Research and Development George Bettany – Sanctus Stefan Magnusson – Mystery Applicant Seun Awoyele – […] The post

El proyecto Orion B nos muestra con otros ojos la Nebulosa de Orión

Thursday, May 25, 08:24 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

El proyecto ORION B ( Outstanding Radio-Imaging of Orion B) ha logrado el mapa molecular más detallado de la nebulosa de Orión. Usando el radiotelescopio IRAM de 30 metros, situado en Sierra Nevada, España, se han observado las emisiones […] Leer más

Del reciclaje en la ciencia ficción

Thursday, May 25, 08:00 UTC @ brucknerite

¿Una serie de televisión de Star Trek? Si tú, lector, eres un joven aficionado al nuevo Trek que arrancó en 2009 y que lleva ya tres películas —más una cuarta en preparación—, la idea de ver algo relacionado con Star Trek en formato serie puede resultarte algo ajena. Pero pocos universos ficticios tienen más pedigrí: … Continúa leyendo Del reciclaje en la

The Marc Newson Hourglass for Hodinkee

Thursday, May 25, 03:59 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Watch the video and read this. I’ll update this post with my comments later today. Update: OK, so my take on this is going to upset many of you. I first saw this last night via this tweet from Marco Arment, and I read through the replies and every single one of them was mocking either the entire premise of an exquisite hourglass or at the very least the price. I think this looks beautiful, and I d

New app lets crowds use their phones to display a single message

Wednesday, May 24, 22:54 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

More than 4 million people, across every state in the US, participated in the January 22 Women’s March. And the recent Earth Day marches spanned six continents. The messages were clear – but there were hundreds if not thousands of them (from pink knitted caps, to “There’s No Planet B” scrawled on cardboard signs). I […] The post New app lets crowds use their phones to display a single message appear

‘Spectre’ Trailer Re-Cut With Roger Moore as Bond

Wednesday, May 24, 21:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

This is so well done it gave me goosebumps. Makes me think the franchise could use some Moore-like suaveness when they recast the role post-Craig. ★

‘Moonraker’ — The Insane Attempt to Turn James Bond Into ‘Star Wars’ in 1979

Wednesday, May 24, 21:23 UTC @ Daring Fireball

James Whitbrook, writing for io9: Moonraker might not be the best Bond movie — it might not even be the best of Moore’s time with the Bond mantle. But all these years later, its goofy charm perhaps best represents the joyful camp that Moore brought to his role as 007, something we will always remember now that he’s gone. Over the years, my youthful resistance to campiness has faded, and my esteem for Moonraker has grown.

Using Kotlin to make Android APIs fun again

Wednesday, May 24, 21:16 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

From the Annals of Anal

Wednesday, May 24, 21:16 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The New York Daily News: At approximately 6:30 a.m. Monday, a car crash involving two pickup trucks sent one of the vehicles inside the AnalTech building of Newark, Del., leaving a giant hole. The truck damaged the facility’s laboratory and caused an odor to emanate from the cavity, WDEL reports. Regarding the compa

★ Safari vs. Chrome on the Mac

Wednesday, May 24, 20:36 UTC @ Daring Fireball

As someone who’s been a Mac user long enough to remember when there were *no* good web browsers for the Mac, having both Safari and Chrome feels downright bountiful, and the competition is making both of them better.

The Architect Elevator — Visiting the upper floors

Wednesday, May 24, 17:22 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Gregor Hohpe has taken his experience with ThoughtWorks and Google to a traditional insurance company. As an enterprise architect he sees his role as riding the elevator between the exe

Student’s future, teacher’s past

Wednesday, May 24, 15:04 UTC @ John D. Cook

“Teachers should prepare the student for the student’s future, not for the teacher’s past.” — Richard Hamming I ran across the above quote from Hamming this morning. It made me wonder whether I tried to prepare students for my past when I used to teach college students. How do you prepare a student for the […]

Awash in Sea of Data, Ecologists Turn to Open Access Tools

Wednesday, May 24, 14:58 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

To assess the ocean’s health, ecology’s “rugged individualists” learned to get with the big data program.

Side Effects, Front and Center!

Wednesday, May 24, 14:51 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

We think of computation in terms of its consequences. The big MapReduce job returns a large result. Web interactions display information. Enterprise applications update the database and return an answer. These are the reasons we do our work. What we rarely discuss are the side effects of doing the work we intend. Side effects may be unwanted, or they may actually cause desired behavior at different layers of the system. This column points out some fun patterns to keep in mind as we build and use our systems

Five Things That Make Kotlin Interesting

Wednesday, May 24, 14:31 UTC @ tecosystems

It’s interesting to ponder whether this is where it all started for Google and Kotlin. As Tim Bray notes, it wouldn’t be the first time that Steve Yegge has moved the needle. Regardless, Google’s decision to anoint the language as a “first class citizen” for the Android platform is interesting news. For many, if not

Five Things That Make Kotlin Interesting

Wednesday, May 24, 14:31 UTC @ tecosystems

It’s interesting to ponder whether this is where it all started for Google and Kotlin. As Tim Bray notes, it wouldn’t be the first time that Steve Yegge has moved the needle. Regardless, Google’s decision to anoint the language as a “first class citizen” for the Android platform is interesting news. For many, if not

The Mathematics of Juggling

Wednesday, May 24, 14:11 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Juggling has advanced enormously in recent decades, thanks in part to the mathematical study of possible patterns.

Science Busts The Biggest Myth Ever About Why Bridges Collapse (Synopsis)

Wednesday, May 24, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“At least six lamp posts were snapped off while I watched. A few minutes later, I saw a side girder bulge out. But, though the bridge was bucking up at an angle of 45 degrees, I thought she would be able to fight it out. But, that wasn’t to be.” -Bert Farquharson If you’ve only ever…

What’s that mystery in your inbox costing you?

Wednesday, May 24, 13:22 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Here I Go Again. Why My Second Startup is Different. | Nick Halstead, Cognitive Logic | BoS Europe 2016

Wednesday, May 24, 09:10 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Nick Halstead, CEO & Founder, Cognitive Logic Nick is the Founder of Cognitive Logic Inc which is building unique technology to allow collaboration on corporate data between companies without data needing to be shared or transmitted. Nick discusses some of the things that he has learned at DataSift he is applying to his new startup, […] The post Here I

Databases from finite categories

Wednesday, May 24, 06:43 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Spivak and Kent (2011). Ologs: A categorical framework for knowledge representation: In this paper we introduce the olog, or ontology log, a category-theoretic model for knowledge representation (KR). Grounded in formal mathematics, ologs can be rigorously formulated and cross-compared in ways that other KR models (such as semantic networks) cannot. An olog is similar to a relational database schema; in fact an olog can serve as a data

GAMBIT

Wednesday, May 24, 02:04 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

The LHCP 2017 conference was held this past week in Shanghai, and among the results announced there were new negative results about SUSY from ATLAS with both ATLAS and CMS now reporting for instance limits on gluino masses of around … Continue reading →

Meeting Roger Moore

Wednesday, May 24, 01:27 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Amazing story from Marc Haynes about meeting Roger Moore as a 7-year-old in 1983. (This tweet I’m linking to has screenshots of Haynes’s post on Facebook; here’s the same story in text copied and pasted into a forum, without attribution. Have I ever complained about how much I dislike Facebook?)

/u/perplexinglyemma on Rust support for KDevelop being worked on as a GSoC project

Tuesday, May 23, 23:27 UTC @ gilded : rust

Hahah. I know everyone loves Rust but I didn't expect to reach this subreddit within an hour of posting my blog on PlanetKDE. Anyway, I'm the one working on this, so please feel free to let me know any particular features you would really like to see. I have a couple of things in mind, but it's always good to get some more feedback :)

Stopped Watches and Data Analytics

Tuesday, May 23, 21:50 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Is this a new or old paradox? UK Independent source—and “a gentle irony” Roger Bannister is a British neurologist. He received the first Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy for Neurology in 2005. Besides his extensive research and many papers in neurology, his 25 years of revising and expanding the bellwether text Clinical Neurology […]

Thoughts on the passing of Sir Roger Moore

Tuesday, May 23, 20:32 UTC @ Joe's Blog

I was born in the 1970s. Thus, my conception of James Bond will always be embodied by Sir Roger Moore. While the popular opinion is that Sean Connery will always be the “definitive Bond”—whatever that means—to me, Sir Roger Moore is the essential Bond, if for no other reason than he had to endure the read more »

Implementing JSON Feed

Tuesday, May 23, 20:23 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Dr. Drang, after adding JSON Feed support for both his blog publishing engine and his homegrown feed reader: JSON Feed, for all its advantages, may be a flash in the pan. Not only do bloggers and publishing platforms have to adopt it, so do the major aggregator/reader services like Feedly and Digg and the analytics services like FeedPress and FeedBurner. But even if JSON Feed doesn’t take off, the time I spent adding it to my blog and aggregator was so short I won’t regre

Quit measuring employee engagement

Tuesday, May 23, 20:01 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Feedbin, Too

Tuesday, May 23, 18:50 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ben Ubois, announcing support for JSON Feed in Feedbin: One of the criticisms I’ve seen of JSON Feed is that there’s no incentive for feed readers to support JSON Feed. This is not true. One of the largest-by-volume support questions I get is along the lines of “Why does this random feed not work?” And, 95% of the time, it’s because the feed is broken in some subtle way. JSON Feed will help alleviate these problems, because it’s easier to get right. I also want JSON

NewsBlur Now Supports JSON Feed

Tuesday, May 23, 18:44 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Samuel Clay, founder of NewsBlur: Starting today, NewsBlur now officially supports the new JSON Feed spec. And there’s nothing extra you have to do. This means if a website syndicates their stories with the easy-to-write and easy-to-read JSON format, you can read it on NewsBlur. It should make no difference to you, since you’re reading the end product. But to website developers everywhere, supporting JSON Feeds is so much easier than supporting XML-based RSS/Atom.

Roger Moore’s Recipe for a Perfect Martini

Tuesday, May 23, 18:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Worth a re-link today: Roger Moore, two years ago, writing for The Guardian: The sad fact is that I know exactly how to make a dry martini but I can’t drink them because, two years ago, I discovered I was diabetic. I prefer one with gin, but James Bond liked a vodka martini, “shaken not stirred” — which I never said, by the way. That was Sean Connery, remember him? The worst martini I’ve ever

★ ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’

Tuesday, May 23, 18:11 UTC @ Daring Fireball

In memory of Roger Moore, a brief look at his best Bond film.

Roger Moore Dies at 89

Tuesday, May 23, 17:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

A terrific and much-loved actor, but also by all accounts a good man. “Who’s your favorite James Bond?” is a fun game to play, because there’s no wrong answer. I have at least two friends who swear their answer is Lazenby. But one thing I would argue is undeniable about Moore’s run as Bond is that he was the perfect Bond for the 70s. He didn’t just keep the franchise going, he helped adapt it to the times. Sean Connery made Bond a sensation. Roger Moore

How to start

Tuesday, May 23, 15:57 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Xenon1T publica su primer resultado sobre materia oscura

Tuesday, May 23, 14:38 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

XENON1T busca partículas de materia oscura usando una tonelada de xenón líquido (1042 ± 12 kg). En tan solo 34,2 días ha obtenido un resultado un poco mejor al de LUX (que con 129,5 kg de xenón líquido había […] Leer más

The Business Cycle, Part 1

Tuesday, May 23, 14:32 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Isaac Newton vs. Las Vegas: How Physicists Used Science To Beat The Odds At Roulette (Synopsis)

Tuesday, May 23, 14:01 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“I don’t always bet the same way I talk. Good advice is one thing, but smart gambling is quite another.” -Hunter S. Thompson Did you know the world’s first wearable computer was built all the way back in the 1960s, was worn on your feet… and was used to help gamblers cheat at roulette? Physicists…

AlphaGo vence a Ke Jie, el número uno mundial en Go

Tuesday, May 23, 13:43 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Aplastante, 3:0. AlphaGo, la inteligencia artificial de DeepMind (Google), lo ha vuelto a hacer. El chino Ke Jie de 19 años, el número uno mundial, ha perdido las tres partidas (la primera por la mínima posible y las otras […] Leer más La entrada

Meet the TEDGlobal 2017 Fellows

Tuesday, May 23, 13:00 UTC @ TED Blog

Meet the new class of TEDGlobal 2017 Fellows! Representing 18 countries — including, for the first time in our program, Somalia, Uruguay, Liberia and Zimbabwe — this class clears a high bar of talent, creativity and eccentricity. Among those selected, you’ll find a Somali computer scientist catalyzing the tech scene in Somalia and Somaliland; a […]

The Thoughts of a Spiderweb

Tuesday, May 23, 11:47 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

Spiders appear to offload cognitive tasks to their webs, making them one of a number of species with a mind that isn’t fully confined within the head.

This Week in Rust 183

Tuesday, May 23, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Rust and CSV parsing

Tuesday, May 23, 02:42 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/burntsushi [link] [comments]

So You Want To Do Mobile Application Development?

Monday, May 22, 21:44 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Mobile application development has been a big deal for several years now. When we talk about it, we are not talking about anything new. Technologies, tools, frameworks, services and pretty much everything related to this subject are getting better and better every day. It is a great time to be a mobile developer because the most popular frameworks for mobile are so advanced. But even with the overwhelming amount of documentation, examples, and guides, I frequently hear questions and/or comme

[Sponsor] Flow: Simple Project Management

Monday, May 22, 21:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Flow is simple project management for busy teams. It’s the easiest way to run your team, manage projects, track tasks, and stay up to date with everything happening at work. Teams choose Flow when email, sticky notes, and to-do apps aren’t enough, but complex project management tools are overkill. Flow’s world-class design team has worked with companies like Apple, Slack, TED, and Starbucks, so it’s simple, beautiful, and easy to use. Your team will love using it, and pick it up in minutes

Spotlight Performance Problems on iOS

Monday, May 22, 19:57 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Nick Heer: I’ve generally had pretty good luck with Spotlight on iOS, but I’ve long noticed that results are delayed or nonexistent after not using it for a little while, particularly if I haven’t rebooted my phone recently. I thought I was losing my head a little bit, until I found a tip on Twitter from Anand Iyer : Settings > General > Spotlight Search > toggle Slack off A week or so ago I ran into this, where Spotlight was running so slowly on my i

How Anker Is Beating Apple and Samsung at Their Own Accessory Game

Monday, May 22, 19:45 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Nice profile of Anker by Nick Statt for The Verge: So in airports, the back of cabs, and on city streets we’re plugging into lithium-ion slabs in our pockets and bags to stay connected. The market for portable battery packs generated $360 million in the 12 months ending in March, 2017 in the US alone. The brands behind these packs are largely anonymous — Kmashi, Jackery, and iMuto — and they often stay that way. Except Anker. The steady rise of the company’s pro

TED Prize winner Sarah Parcak unearths ancient mysteries on “60 Minutes”

Monday, May 22, 19:17 UTC @ TED Blog

What’s the best way to find something lost on the ground, like a historical site from a civilization lost to time? For archaeologist Sarah Parcak, the answer’s obvious — from way up above, using satellites, of course. As a space archaeologist, she’s mapped the lost city of Tanis (of Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark […]

‘On Margins’

Monday, May 22, 19:02 UTC @ Daring Fireball

New podcast from the inimitable Craig Mod about the art of making books. The first episode is an interview with Jan Chipchase: Researcher and author Jan Chipchase has a new book — “The Field Study Handbook.” We discuss how he came to produce this 500+ page magnum opus — a distillation of his life’s work — and why he is self publishing.

Boring Google

Monday, May 22, 18:45 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Ben Thompson, in praise of Google’s “boring” I/O keynote: Google Assistant has a long ways to go, but there is a clear picture of what success will look like: Google Photos. Launched only two years ago, Pichai bragged that Photos now has over 500 million active users who upload 1.2 billion photos a day. This is a spectacular number for one very simple reason: Google Photos is not the default photo app for Android or iOS. Rather, Google has earned all of thos

Every Color of Cardigan Mister Rogers Wore From 1979–2001

Monday, May 22, 17:53 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Owen Philips, writing for The Awl: Fortunately, Tim Lybarger, a 40 year-old high school counselor from just outside of Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, wondered the same thing a few years ago. Back in 2011, on his blog devoted to all things Mister Rogers, neighborhoodarchive.com, Lybarger recorded the color of every sweater Rogers wore in each episode between 1979 and 2001. “When I realized such a resource didn’t exist,” Lybarger told me over email, “I just felt like somebody neede

Scrolling Is Going to Change in Mobile Safari

Monday, May 22, 17:29 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Here’s an interesting exchange in a Hacker News discussion about my criticism of AMP over the weekend. Malte Ubl, creator and tech lead of Google AMP: With respect to scrolling: We (AMP team) filed a bug with Apple about that (we didn’t implement scrolling ourselves, just use a div with overflow). We asked to make the scroll inertia for

News Explorer 1.6 Supports JSON Feed

Monday, May 22, 17:10 UTC @ Daring Fireball

First native app I’ve seen with support for JSON Feed. Pretty interesting take on a modern Mac feed reader, including nice support for using the keyboard arrow keys to move around the UI. ★

‘Becoming Bond’

Monday, May 22, 16:35 UTC @ Daring Fireball

New documentary from Hulu on George Lazenby, who played James Bond in 1969’s On Her Majesty’s Secret Service and then turned down an offer for a six-picture contract. Watched it over the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it. ★

It’s Dimming! Astronomers jump at opportunity to solve the mystery of Tabby’s Star (Synopsis)

Monday, May 22, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“As far as I can tell, every telescope that can look at it right now is looking at it right now.” -Matt Muterspaugh Earlier this decade, the Kepler mission became the most successful planet-finding endeavor of all time, turning up thousands of new worlds by measuring the transit data of some 150,000 stars. When planets…

The Power of Blockchain + Watson

Monday, May 22, 13:53 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The impact of disruptive digital technologies like artificial intelligence and blockchain goes well beyond finance and payments, touching all aspects of the real economy. This is an underappreciated fact, and it’s what makes these technologies so exciting. Now, a new application developed by IBM Research that fuses artificial intelligence into blockchain opens up further possibilities […] The post

Paranoia won’t save you in the end

Monday, May 22, 12:45 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Stack View Baseline Alignment Issue

Monday, May 22, 12:21 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

A horizontal stack view can align text based views on the first or last baseline of the text. Unfortunately the stack view ends up with an incorrect height when the first text view is not the view that extends furthest above/below the baseline. Adding some extra constraints works around the problem. Baseline Alignment of Text Here is what I expect to happen. I have a horizontal stack view with three text labels. The second text label uses a font

Ideal background for algebraic geometry

Monday, May 22, 11:20 UTC @ John D. Cook

From Foundations of Algebraic Geometry: … in an ideal world, people would learn this material over many years, after having background courses in commutative algebra, algebraic topology, differential geometry, complex analysis, homological algebra, number theory, and French literature.

Going Without the Flow - Exploring Collection View Layouts

Monday, May 22, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Introduction Collection views are extremely versatile - there’s even speculation that the venerable UITableView will be soft-deprecated in favour of its more flexible and powerful cousin. But this versatility comes with a price - collection views, and particularly collection view layouts, can become complicated, and the official documentation for some of the more interesting areas is a little

Comments of the Week #161: From the Big Crunch to cracking the Standard Model

Sunday, May 21, 19:27 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing.” -Theodore Roosevelt It’s been an incredible week here at Starts With A Bang! We’ve covered everything from the night sky’s newest supernova to the possible fates of the Universe to what might be our window…

Changing your mind

Sunday, May 21, 13:20 UTC @ John D. Cook

From Dorothy Sayers’ essay Why Work? It is always strange and painful to have to change a habit of mind; though, when we have made the effort, we may find a great relief, even a sense of adventure and delight, in getting rid of the false and returning to the true.

Quicklisp news: May 2017 Quicklisp dist update now available

Sunday, May 21, 00:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

New projects: cepl.glop — glop host for cepl — BSD 2 Clausecepl.sdl2-image — Some helper methods for using sdl2-image to load images to CEPL types — BSD 2 Clausecepl.sdl2-ttf — A few additional helpers for making working with sdl2-ttf even easier from CEPL — BSD 2 Clau

Viral

Saturday, May 20, 21:03 UTC @ brucknerite

El viernes pasado —mirad la fecha del artículo, no cuesta tanto— publiqué en Twitter un montaje que casi se ha hecho viral: ¿Ingenioso? No, no demasiado. Refleja, aprovechando un viral de verdad sobre la increíble etiqueta de cierta marca de ropa, mi impresión personal sobre el líder de Podemos, Pablo Iglesias: es más egocéntrico que yo, … Continúa leyendo Viral

El mejor consejo de salud posible

Saturday, May 20, 20:31 UTC @ brucknerite

Este artículo se publicó primero en Naukas («El mejor consejo de salud posible») el 17/05/2017. Seré breve. Es posible resumir todos los consejos de salud de médicos y nutricionistas en solo dos palabras mágicas: Sé rico. Ahí tenéis vuestro santo grial. Si tenéis prisa podéis dejar de leer ya. Sin embargo, si os apetece quedaros … Continúa leyendo El mejor co

MacStories’s iOS 11 iPad Wishes and Concept Video

Saturday, May 20, 19:10 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Federico Viticci: I’ve been thinking about some of these ideas since iOS 9 (you can see a thread between my iOS 10 concept and this year’s version), while others would be a natural evolution for iOS on the iPad. Once again, Sam was able to visualize everything with a fantastic concept that, I believe, captures the iPad’s big-picture potential more accurately than last year. Below, you’ll find our

10-Year-Old Open Letter Calling for Apple to Make Glucose Monitors

Saturday, May 20, 19:00 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Amy Tenderich, 10 years ago, in an open letter to Steve Jobs: If insulin pumps or continuous monitors had the form of an iPod Nano, people wouldn’t have to wonder why we wear our “pagers” to our own weddings, or puzzle over that strange bulge under our clothes. If these devices wouldn’t start suddenly and incessantly beeping, strangers wouldn’t lecture us to turn off our “cell phones” at the movie theater. In short, medical device manuf

Scott Gilbertson: ‘Kill Google AMP Before It Kills the Web’

Saturday, May 20, 18:18 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Scott Gilbertson, writing for The Register: Quite a few high-profile web developers have this year weighted in with criticism and some, following a Google conference dedicated to AMP, have cautioned users about diving in with both feet. These, in my view, don’t go far enough in stating the problem and I feel this needs to be said very clearly: G

Arctic Stronghold of World’s Seeds Flooded After Permafrost Melts

Saturday, May 20, 17:52 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Damian Carrington, reporting for The Guardian: It was designed as an impregnable deep-freeze to protect the world’s most precious seeds from any global disaster and ensure humanity’s food supply forever. But the Global Seed Vault, buried in a mountain deep inside the Arctic circle, has been breached after global warming produced extraordinary temperatures over the winter, sending meltwater gushing into the entrance tunnel. The big takeaway from this should be

Ask Ethan: What happens when a black hole’s singularity evaporates? (Synopsis)

Saturday, May 20, 14:58 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“My discovery that black holes emit radiation raised serious problems of consistency with the rest of physics. I have now resolved these problems, but the answer turned out to be not what I expected.” -Stephen Hawking One of the most puzzling things about Black Holes is that if you wait around long enough, they’ll evaporate…

Podcast CB S&R 111: Popurrí de noticias

Saturday, May 20, 10:38 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

He participado en el episodio 111 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Polémica Cosmológica; Plantas Medicinales; Comunicación Cuántica Contrafáctica; Enfermedades en el Hielo”, 19 May 2017. “La tertulia semanal ha repasado las últimas noticias de […]

/u/j_platte on [Help!] Variables + Closures = Headache

Saturday, May 20, 10:07 UTC @ gilded : rust

Aaahhh, that full error message was useful! It's not cookie that fails. The build fails in cursive actually. cargo probably compiles things in parallel, so the last message above the error the first time you got this error was Compiling cookie.... But the path of the file in which the error originates shows it is actually cursive. And they seem to have made a 0.5.1 release recently to fix this regression (nightly added

A funny thing happened on my way to Maker Faire

Friday, May 19, 20:25 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Normally on Friday mornings, I’d be winding my way up a canyon in the hills south of San Jose to IBM Research – Almaden, where I work as an advisory engineer and scientist for our research in magnetoelectonics, spintronics and related fields. Instead, thanks to an amazing confluence of my IBM work and my outside […] The post A funny thing happened on my way to Maker Faire appeared first on

‘It’s Borderline Stupid How Easy It Was’

Friday, May 19, 20:07 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Niclas Darville, on creating a JSON Feed template for Jekyll: It literally took me longer to write this blog post than the JSON feed code, because I couldn’t get Jekyll to escape the Liquid code example. On Twitter, Darville wrote: One of the best things about @jsonfeed is how well it works as a Hello World kind of programming exe

Headline of the Week

Friday, May 19, 19:41 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Actual headline in the staid New York Times: “Trump Told Russians That Firing ‘Nut Job’ Comey Eased Pressure From Investigation”. ★

Francis en LFDLC: Popurrí de noticias (programa 284)

Friday, May 19, 18:31 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Ya puedes escuchar el podcast iVoox del Programa 284 de La Fábrica de la Ciencia, “El vestido cuántico, pelos en los agujeros negros y el último teorema de Fermat con Francis Villatoro”, en el que Jorge Onsulve Orellana, @jonsulve, […] Leer más

Filmmaker Jen Brea gets a Sundance fellowship, Pamela Ronald makes the case for engineered rice, and more

Friday, May 19, 17:27 UTC @ TED Blog

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: A new Sundance grant helps indie films get seen. Making a film is hard enough — but getting the film seen by an audience can be just as difficult, especially in this era of non-stop media shifts. To help, Sundance just launched the Creative Distribution Fellowship — and among [̷

Member of the Band – Gorilla Tess Manderson

Friday, May 19, 15:00 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Tess Manderson

Nuclear Physics Might Hold The Key To Cracking Open The Standard Model (Synopsis)

Friday, May 19, 14:00 UTC @ Starts With A Bang

“It was quite the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life. It was almost as incredible as if you fired a 15-inch shell at a piece of tissue paper and it came back and hit you.” -Ernest Rutherford Nuclear physics has, for decades now, been regarded less as a window…

Discoveries Fuel Fight Over Universe’s First Light

Friday, May 19, 12:13 UTC @ Quanta Magazine

A series of observations at the very edge of the universe has reignited a debate over what lifted the primordial cosmic fog.

Computational Neuroscience

Friday, May 19, 12:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

New Issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development   Understanding the brain’s dynamics is of central importance to neuroscience. Our ability to observe, model, and infer from neuroscientific data the principles and mechanisms of brain dynamics determines our ability to understand the brain’s unusual cognitive and behavioral capabilities. Our guest editors, James Kozloski, […] The post

Can we use gravitational waves to rule out extra dimensions – and string theory with it?

Friday, May 19, 10:47 UTC @ Backreaction

Gravitational Waves, Computer simulation. Credits: Henze, NASA Tl;dr: Probably not. Last week I learned from New Scientist that “Gravitational waves could show hints of extra dimensions.” The article is about a paper which recently appeared on the arxiv: Signatures of extra dimensions in gravitational waves David Andriot and Gustavo Lucena Gómez arXiv:1704.07392 [hep-th] The claim in this

Can we use gravitational waves to rule out extra dimensions – and string theory with it?

Friday, May 19, 10:47 UTC @ Backreaction

Gravitational Waves, Computer simulation. Credits: Henze, NASA Tl;dr: Probably not. Last week I learned from New Scientist that “Gravitational waves could show hints of extra dimensions.” The article is about a paper which recently appeared on the arxiv: Signatures of extra dimensions in gravitational waves David Andriot and Gustavo Lucena Gómez arXiv:1704.07392 [hep-th] The claim in this

Requiring Facebook

Friday, May 19, 02:19 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Jason Ditzian, writing for The Bold Italic on what happened when the car sharing service he’d been using for 10 years was acquired: However, City CarShare was recently bought by a corporation, Getaround. And Getaround built its platform on top of Facebook. So when I went to migrate my account over to them, I found that there’s literally no way to do it as a non-Facebook user. If I want to share cars with my fellow city dwellers, I’m compelled to strike a Faustian bargain.

A quantum experience at Maker Faire

Friday, May 19, 01:41 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

We are taking our new 16 qubit quantum processor on the road, to the Bay Area Maker Faire, from May 19-21. I’ll be there, along with 15-20 other IBMers from our Almaden lab. Our goal: help you learn about quantum computing – and why it’s awesome! Haven’t spent time experimenting with the IBM Q experience, […] The post A quantum experience at Maker Faire appeared first on

FCC Votes to Begin Dismantling Net Neutrality

Thursday, May 18, 22:30 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Karl Bode, writing for TechDirt: Surprising absolutely nobody, the FCC today voted 2-1 along strict party lines to begin dismantling net neutrality protections for consumers. The move comes despite the fact that the vast majority of non-bot comments filed with the FCC support keeping the rules intact. And while FCC boss Ajit Pai has

‘You Know My Name’

Thursday, May 18, 22:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

One of my very favorite songs from Chris Cornell — the opening credits theme to Casino Royale. A great song that just fits the movie so damn well. ★

Chris Cornell of Soundgarden, Dead at 52

Thursday, May 18, 22:20 UTC @ Daring Fireball

The New York Times: Chris Cornell, the powerful, dynamic singer whose band Soundgarden was one of the architects of grunge music, died on Wednesday night in Detroit hours after the band had performed there. He was 52. The death was a suicide by hanging, the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office said in a statement released on Thursday afternoon. It said a full autopsy had not yet been completed. Fuck.

jq

Thursday, May 18, 20:40 UTC @ Daring Fireball

There’s a cool command-line JSON processor called jq — easily installed on a Mac via download or Homebrew, and even more easily tinkered with using the online playground. Here’s how easy jq makes it to get, say, a list of the titles from DF’s JSON feed: curl -s https://... | jq '.items[].title' <

The World’s First JSON Feed Viewer

Thursday, May 18, 20:32 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Maxime Vaillancourt: Here’s a tiny proof of concept for a @jsonfeed viewer, built in an hour: http://... One of the things I love about JSON Feed is that it’s fun. JSON is so simple, and so well-supported by almost all programming languages, that you can build something interesting in ju

Apple Is Testing an Apple Watch Glucose Monitor

Thursday, May 18, 20:24 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Christina Farr, reporting for CNBC: Tim Cook has been spotted at the Apple campus test-driving a device that tracks blood sugar, which was connected to his Apple Watch. A source said that Cook was wearing a prototype glucose-tracker on the Apple Watch, which points to future applications that would make the device a “must have” for millions of people with diabetes — or at risk for the disease.

CMD-D: Masters of Automation Conference

Thursday, May 18, 19:53 UTC @ Daring Fireball

This sounds very cool: a one-day conference in August devoted to Mac and iOS scripting and automation, hosted by Paul Kent, Naomi Pearce, and Sal Soghoian. ★

Playground: Whatʼs new in Swift 4

Thursday, May 18, 18:32 UTC @ Ole Begemann

I made an Xcode playground that lets you try out many of the new features coming in Swift 4. You can download it on GitHub. The cool thing is that you can run the playground right now in Xcode 8.3; you donʼt have to wait for the first official Swift 4.0 beta, which will probably come as part of Xcode 9 at WWDC. All you need to do is install the latest Swift snapshot from swift.org (donʼt

Training Watson to see what’s on your plate

Thursday, May 18, 14:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Today, we’re introducing our latest AI research in the form of a new beta feature: the IBM Watson Visual Recognition food model. This feature provides a built-in capability for recognizing 2,000+ different foods within images, providing enhanced specificity and accuracy in this content domain compared to Visual Recognition’s general tagging feature. Using the food model, […] The post Trai

The Optimizers

Thursday, May 18, 12:42 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Last week the Georgia Tech School of Industrial and Systems Engineering honored the 80th birthday of George Nemhauser and

Volume of a rose-shaped torus

Thursday, May 18, 10:50 UTC @ John D. Cook

Start with a rose, as described in the previous post: Now spin that rose around a vertical line a distance R from the center of the rose. This makes a torus (doughnut) shape whose cross sections look like the rose above. You could think of having a cutout shaped like the rose above and extruding Play-Doh […]

JSON Feed

Wednesday, May 17, 20:22 UTC @ inessential.com

I was hesitant, even up to this morning, to publish the JSON Feed spec. If you read Dave Winer’s Rules for standards-makers, you’ll see that we did a decent job with some of the rules — the spec is written in plain English, for example — but a strict application of the rules would have meant not publishing at all, since “Fewer formats is better.” I agree com

Building products

Wednesday, May 17, 17:17 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Apple Pay Has Expanded to Italy

Wednesday, May 17, 15:30 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

You can now support Apple Pay for your customers in Italy, providing an easy and secure way for them to pay within your apps and websites with a single touch.Learn more about Apple Pay.

The Calculus of Service Availability

Wednesday, May 17, 14:45 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Most services offered by Google aim to offer 99.99 percent (sometimes referred to as the "four 9s") availability to users. Some services contractually commit to a lower figure externally but set a 99.99 percent target internally. This more stringent target accounts for situations in which users become unhappy with service performance well before a contract violation occurs, as the number one aim of an SRE team is to keep users happy. For many services, a 99.99 percent internal target represents the sweet sp

Paying customers, not paying Facebook, Google, or Twitter.

Wednesday, May 17, 14:36 UTC @ Signal v. Noise - Medium

Length of a rose

Wednesday, May 17, 12:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

The polar graph of r = cos(kθ) is called a rose. If k is even, the curve will trace out 2k petals as θ runs between 0 and 2π. If k is odd, it will trace out k petals, tracing each one twice. For example, here’s a rose with k = 5. (I rotated the […]

We asked 3 experts: How will AI change our lives in the near future?

Wednesday, May 17, 11:43 UTC @ TED Blog

Imagine a world where your car drives itself, your fridge does the grocery shopping, and robots work alongside you. Rapid advances in artificial intelligence are turning that world into a near-future possibility. But what will that future really look like, and how will it change our lives? We spoke with three artificial intelligence experts at […]

Growing Profitable Businesses in the Second Machine Age | Stephen Allott, Pebble Code | BoS Europe 2016

Wednesday, May 17, 09:00 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Stephen Allott spoke at Bos Europe 2016 – just one example of the smart software people we bring to our events. View our BoS Europe 2017 agenda for more information about this year’s speakers. Stephen Allott, Chairman, Pebble Code We’re in the Second Machine Age, demand for software is rocketing. Large enterprises and governments are […] The post

New Downloads Now Available

Tuesday, May 16, 17:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Test your apps with the latest release of macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.macOS Sierra 10.12.6 (16G8c)iOS 10.3.3 (14G5028a)watchOS 3.2.3 (14V5726a)tvOS 10.2.2 (14W5726a)View all downloads.

This Month’s Hype

Tuesday, May 16, 15:28 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

It seems that a couple of the authors of the recent Cosmic Controversy letter (discussed here) are going on a campaign to embarrass the 29 physicists who were convinced to sign their letter. Andrei Linde has gone to Lubos Motl’s … Continue reading →

“Not a Toy” - New Video about Symmetry Breaking

Tuesday, May 16, 15:25 UTC @ Backreaction

Here is the third and last of the music videos I produced together with Apostolos Vasilidis and Timo Alho, sponsored by FQXi. The first two are here and here. In this video, I am be-singing a virtual particle pair that tries to separate, and quite literally reflect on the inevitable imperfection of reality. The lyrics of this song went through an estimated ten thousand iterations until we

“Not a Toy” - New Video about Symmetry Breaking

Tuesday, May 16, 15:25 UTC @ Backreaction

Here is the third and last of the music videos I produced together with Apostolos Vasilidis and Timo Alho, sponsored by FQXi. The first two are here and here. In this video, I am be-singing a virtual particle pair that tries to separate, and quite literally reflect on the inevitable imperfection of reality. The lyrics of this song went through an estimated ten thousand iterations until we

If an ugrad asks `is field X worth studying' the answer is almost always yes

Tuesday, May 16, 13:28 UTC @ Computational Complexity

An undergraduate Freshman recently emailed me that he was very interested in Quantum Computing and wanted to know 1) Who on the fCS aculty works in QC (Answer: Andrew Childs though you should ask him about postdocs, grad students, and Physics faulty in the area.) 2) What are good books on QC for a bright ugrad. I said the following: QC since Democritus by Aaronson QC-A gentle introduction by Rieffel and Polak QC for CS by Yanofsy and Mannucci QC and Q

Facilitating Peer Review with Cognitive Computing

Tuesday, May 16, 12:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Applying for or allocating funding for scientific research takes up a significant amount of time and energy, both from the scientists and the national foundations that evaluate the science itself. Almost 10 percent of the NSF budget is allocated to the review and management of awards, and this figure is nearly 20 percent for the […] The post Facilitating Peer Review with Cognitive Computing appeare

The Dodecahedron, the Icosahedron and E8

Tuesday, May 16, 09:39 UTC @ Azimuth

Here you can see the slides of a talk I’m giving: • The dodecahedron, the icosahedron and E8, Annual General Meeting of the Hong Kong Mathematical Society, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. It’ll take place on 10:50 am Saturday May 20th in Lecture Theatre G. You can see the program for the whole […]

New committer: Jochen Neumeister (ports)

Tuesday, May 16, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

This Week in Rust 182

Tuesday, May 16, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

When length equals area

Tuesday, May 16, 02:39 UTC @ John D. Cook

The graph of hyperbolic cosine is called a catenary. A catenary has the following curious property: the length of a catenary between two points equals the area under the catenary between those two points. The proof is surprisingly simple. Start with the following: Now integrate the first and last expressions between two points a and […]

[Sponsor] Stashword iOS App and Website

Monday, May 15, 22:52 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Stashword’s iOS app is a simple yet feature rich password manager trusted by thousands of users. Stashword is not just an incredible password manager, it is also a secure digital vault where you can save, organize and share notes, codes, bank information, credit cards, and more. You can even scan and save documents such as your drivers license, insurance, passport etc. Stashword is free to try for 15 days. Paid membership enables you to synchronize across all your devices and use their full-

Lejos de aquí

Monday, May 15, 20:01 UTC @ brucknerite

Tenía ocho años y ya se había dado cuenta de que el sueño de su vida, viajar entre las estrellas a bordo de una nave espacial, sería imposible. Odió a la persona que se lo hizo entender desde la ventana rectangular del televisor en color nuevo de su casa, una noche de finales de verano. Lo … Continúa leyendo Lejos de aquí

New Downloads Now Available

Monday, May 15, 17:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Test your apps with the latest release of macOS, iOS, watchOS, and tvOS.macOS Sierra 10.12.5 (16F73)iOS 10.3.2 (14F89 | 14F90)watchOS 3.2.2 (14V485)tvOS 10.2.1 (14W585a)View all downloads.

Under pressure: New ptychography technique examines stressed atoms in 3D

Monday, May 15, 15:51 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

In a small lead hutch-protected chamber at Argonne National Labs is a nano-probe that bombards nano-sized electronic devices, like a transistor, for example, with x-rays. Think of it as a CT scan. But for atoms. It’s building a 3D model of that device’s atomic structure, for which we can examine the amount of strain it […] The post Under pressure: New ptychography technique examines stressed atoms in 3D

Patrick Stein: Fog of Light - Getting Underway

Monday, May 15, 14:09 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Dauntless (The Lost Fleet, Book 1) was the first science-fiction book I read that tried to deal with space combat with the real-world constraint that light only travels so fast. It takes light eight minutes to get from the Sun to Earth. It takes light more than a second to get from the Earth to the Moon. Depending on where they are in their orbits, it takes be

Podcast with Rebecca Wirfs-Brock on Agility and Architecture

Monday, May 15, 13:32 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Ryan Lockard (Agile Uprising) invited me to join Rebecca Wirfs-Brock for a podcast

Competitive local routing with constraints

Monday, May 15, 10:44 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

Let $P$ be a set of $n$ vertices in the plane and $S$ a set of non-crossing line segments between vertices in $P$, called constraints. Two vertices are visible if the straight line segment connecting them does not properly intersect any constraints. The constrained $\Theta_m$-graph is constructed by partitioning the plane around each vertex into $m$ disjoint cones, each with aperture $\theta = 2 \pi/m$, and adding an edge to the `closest' visible vertex in each cone. We consider how to route on the constrai

Moving Core Data Files

Monday, May 15, 08:40 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Using Core Data with an SQLite database and need to move the location of the store or replace the contents? Resist the temptation to use direct file operations and use the persistent store coordinator to do the job for you. There are at least a couple of common situations when you may need to move a Core Data store: You decided to add an App Extension and need to move your store into a shared AppGroup directory. You need to populate or reset a store to a default da

January-March 2017 Status Report

Monday, May 15, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

The January to March 2017 Status Report is now available.

Conferencia “Ciencia, mujeres y redes sociales: ¿una mezcla sencilla?” por Marta Macho Stadler

Monday, May 15, 07:57 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

Las redes sociales ayudan a visibilizar a las mujeres en ciencia, tecnología y cultura en general. El referente en España es el blog “Mujeres con ciencia” de la Cátedra de Cultura Científica de la Universidad del País Vasco. Su […] Leer más

A Mother’s Day Cryptogram?

Monday, May 15, 04:59 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Or just human ingenuity at finding patterns in ‘random’ data? Cropped from source Bill Clinton was the 42nd President of the United States. He came close to becoming the first First Gentleman—or whatever we will call the husband of a female president. He is also a fan of crossword puzzles, and co-authored with Victor Fleming […]

Express Yourself Swift Style

Monday, May 15, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

The deeper parts of a language are typically hidden away from the user; only accessible to the inner machinations of the linker, lexer and loader. However, The Swift Standard Library exposes language features we take for granted in the form of protocols. Specifically, I’ll be talking about the “ExpressibleBy___” family of protocols. This power is not without great responsibility, as we’ve seen with custom operators, “too much of a good thing” can harm readability and maintenance. Sinc

information.subscribe(next)

Monday, May 15, 00:00 UTC @ Pedro Piñera

I woke up this morning thinking about the parallelism that we could establish between what programmers know as reactive paradigm, and how we’re hooked to the information around us. In the past, there wasn’t that much information and most of the access to it was in a “pull” manner. Only if you were interested in reading or knowing about something, you found the information by yourself. That allowed us to have more control over the consumption of the information. When we wanted to g

William Tutte (1917-2002)

Sunday, May 14, 13:18 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Today we celebrate ou

AES-GCM-SIV

Sunday, May 14, 04:00 UTC @ ImperialViolet

AEADs combine encryption and authentication in a way that provides the properties that people generally expect when they “encrypt” something. This is great because, historically, handing people a block cipher and a hash function has resulted in a lot of bad and broken constructions. Standardising AEADs avoids this. Common AEADs have a sharp edge though: you must never encrypt two different messages with the same key and nonce. Doing so generally violates the confidentiality of the two m

Solving systems of polynomial equations

Saturday, May 13, 15:48 UTC @ John D. Cook

In a high school algebra class, you learn how to solve polynomial equations in one variable, and systems of linear equations. You might reasonably ask “So when do we combine these and learn to solve systems of polynomial equations?” The answer would be “Maybe years from now, but most likely never.” There are systematic ways to […]

Podcast CB S&R 110: Popurrí de noticias

Saturday, May 13, 11:42 UTC @ La Ciencia de la Mula Francis

He participado en el episodio 110 del podcast Coffee Break: Señal y Ruido [iVoox, iTunes], titulado “Equipo Tabby! nueva física CERN; exfoliantes y mastodontes; ¿el Sol es especial? misteriosa señal; violinidad!”, 11 May 2017. “La tertulia semanal ha repasado […] Leer más

Subscription Based Pricing is not the Answer

Friday, May 12, 18:00 UTC @ Dan Counsell

The real push towards subscription based apps started in June 2016 when Apple announced that subscription pricing was available for regular apps. I'm noticing more and more indie developers considering the move, and some have already made the jump to this new pricing model.

★ Dropping Tech Giants

Friday, May 12, 15:58 UTC @ Daring Fireball

My answer to Farhad Manjoo’s question: “If an evil monarch forced you to choose, in what order would you give up these inescapable giants of tech?”

Better GitHub Searching

Friday, May 12, 14:10 UTC @ Indie Stack

Sometimes when I’m searching a GitHub repository, I end up with a ton of uninteresting results because there are, for example, tests or documentation in the repository that are not pertinent to what I’m searching for. For example, in the Apple Swift repository, searching for “struct String” currently yields 22 results, many of which are … Continue reading Better G

Keynote on Event-Driven Architecture

Thursday, May 11, 19:00 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Last week I gave the opening keynote at goto Chicago. For a topic, I decided to go into the results of ThoughtWorks's Event-Driven architecture summit that I wrote some notes on earlier this year.

How to Solve It

Thursday, May 11, 13:07 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Today a guest post from Periklis Papakonstantinou, coincidentally not unrelated to Bill's post earlier this week. I'll be back with a special post on Sunday. I'm teaching in an undergrad program that is half computer science and half business at Rutgers, but the CS part taught there is the real thing (I assume for Business too). This

A Philosopher Tries to Understand the Black Hole Information Paradox

Thursday, May 11, 12:33 UTC @ Backreaction

Is the black hole information loss paradox really a paradox? Tim Maudlin, a philosopher from NYU and occasional reader of this blog, doesn’t think so. Today, he has a paper on the arXiv in which he complains that the so-called paradox isn’t and physicists don’t understand what they are talking about. (Information) Paradox Lost Tim Maudlin arXiv:1705.03541 [physics.hist-ph] So is the paradox a

A Philosopher Tries to Understand the Black Hole Information Paradox

Thursday, May 11, 12:33 UTC @ Backreaction

Is the black hole information loss paradox really a paradox? Tim Maudlin, a philosopher from NYU and occasional reader of this blog, doesn’t think so. Today, he has a paper on the arXiv in which he complains that the so-called paradox isn’t and physicists don’t understand what they are talking about. (Information) Paradox Lost Tim Maudlin arXiv:1705.03541 [physics.hist-ph] So is the paradox a

On blockchain and leaning in with new IBM Distinguished Engineer Vita Bortnikov

Thursday, May 11, 07:50 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Vita Bortnikov has had to cross quite a few bridges – from her childhood in Ukraine, to choosing a career path after only two years in Israel, and through her years at IBM. What seemed like a cut-and-dried choice to 18-year-old Vita – mathematics or computers – has led to a successful and satisfying professional […] The post On blockchain and leaning in with new IBM Distinguis

A Cosmic Controversy

Wednesday, May 10, 22:01 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

A couple months ago Scientific American published an article by Ijjas, Steinhardt and Loeb (also available here), which I discussed a bit here. One aspect of the article was its strong challenge to multiverse mania, calling it the “multimess” and … Continue reading →

Some Quick Items

Wednesday, May 10, 21:40 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

A few quick items, I may use this posting to add a couple more later, the next posting will discuss today’s letter to Scientific American about inflation. Today’s LHCC meeting at CERN had reports from the LHC machine and experiments. … Continue reading →

Conversations with Technology Leaders: Erik Meijer

Wednesday, May 10, 16:53 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Whether you are a leader, a programmer, or just someone aspiring to be better, I am sure there are some smart takeaways from our conversation that will help you grow in your role. Oh, and if you read to the end, you can find out what his favorite job interview question is - and see if you would be able to pass his test.

From Happy Consultant Developer to Unhappy Product CEO | Peter Coppinger, Teamwork | BoS Europe 2016

Wednesday, May 10, 12:42 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Peter Coppinger has cited BoS talks as “changing his company”. He made the leap from BoS regular attendee to BoS speaker in 2016. Check out the BoS Europe  2017 agenda for more “company changing” talks. Peter Coppinger, Co-founder & CEO, Teamwork Peter has done a few uncommon things in his career. He built a product […] The post

In memory of Benjamin Barber

Tuesday, May 09, 19:11 UTC @ TED Blog

Nation states are failing miserably on some of the more urgent global challenges of the modern age — especially climate change, predatory capitalism, terrorism and forced migration. Nations are increasingly closed, parochial and outdated, slow to respond to the pressures of a fast changing world. The three and a half long century experiment is rapidly coming […]

Revealing Hidden Objects: Can DDD Improve Your Code?

Tuesday, May 09, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

Applying the patterns of Domain Driven Design (DDD) can improve your architecture. You probably have hidden objects waiting to be discovered!Code that's easier to understand, maintain, and extend — that's the promi

IBMer Supports Africa’s Future Innovators and Entrepreneurs

Tuesday, May 09, 12:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

A few weeks ago Lola Aleru, who is based at IBM’s Africa research lab in Nairobi, Kenya, was presented with an incredible opportunity by her colleague and IBM scientist David Moinina Sengeh. She explains, “David is on the board of directors of the Global Minimum Inc (GMin), a non-profit that encourages young innovators and leaders in […] The post IBMer Supports Africa’s Fut

Yo fui tertuliano en Intereconomía, y puedo demostrarlo

Tuesday, May 09, 11:14 UTC @ brucknerite

Era el año del apocalipsis que no fue. Y escribía: Estaba esperando a algo para publicar esta pequeña historia. No sé muy bien a qué: quizá a tener en mis manos la prueba del crimen. O a que Intereconomía, ventilador afanoso para la hez mental de una mínima caterva de iluminados, concluyera su existencia en … Continúa leyendo Yo fui tertulian

This Week in Rust 181

Tuesday, May 09, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Generating pink noise

Monday, May 08, 20:08 UTC @ John D. Cook

Different colors of noise are named by analogy with colors of light. Pink noise is between white noise and red noise. White noise has equal power at all frequencies, just as white light is a combination of all the frequencies of the visible spectrum. The components of red noise are weighted toward low frequencies, just […]

Interface Builder Tip for Margin Constraints

Monday, May 08, 10:40 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

If you are using Interface Builder to create constraints it can be a real pain dealing with margins. Sometimes you want to create constraints to a layout margin and sometimes you don’t. Here is a quick tip that makes that job less painful. Constraint to Margin Interface Builder has many (too many?) ways to create and edit constraints. I find myself mostly control-dragging between views and choosing the constraints from the popup menu rather than

Students try to memorize rather than understand! Who knew! (everyone)

Monday, May 08, 01:38 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Discrete Math. Required for CS majors, taken mostly by Sophmores. Goal is to teach them how to think rigorously. Topics are logic, number theory (not much), induction, sets, functions, relations, combinatorics (includes Pigeon hole prin, henceoforth PNP), prob, countability, uncountability. We taught the Pigeon Hole Principle and gave MANY examples and HW of the following type: Let A be a subset of {1,...,50} of size 10. Show there are two subsets of A that have the same s

Exploration Day — Words Can't Explain

Monday, May 08, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

MartianCraft has a strong tradition of exploration through pushing the boundaries of mobile software. We are always looking for ways to keep our team members sharp and creative. MartianCraft’s answer to this dilemma is “Exploration Day”, which is modeled after many other hackathon type models — an experience designed to allow our team to attack challenging, and unorthodox problems in a highly compressed timeline. This type of event reinforces the notion that we don’t ne

Planned Reading: The Trick for Reading Nonfiction

Saturday, May 06, 16:51 UTC @ Code Capsule

I am always on the lookout for unusual and interesting books, from which I hope to learn new ideas. But time becomes an issue, as I have to prioritize which books and articles to read first. About a year ago, I wrote an article about the industry standards for nonfiction books, and why such books […]

Away Note

Saturday, May 06, 05:13 UTC @ Backreaction

I'm in Munich next week, playing with the philosophers. Be good while I'm away, back soon. (Below, the girls, missing a few teeth.)

Away Note

Saturday, May 06, 05:13 UTC @ Backreaction

I'm in Munich next week, playing with the philosophers. Be good while I'm away, back soon. (Below, the girls, missing a few teeth.)

Phosphorus Sulfides

Friday, May 05, 22:46 UTC @ Azimuth

I think of sulfur and phosphorus as clever chameleons of the periodic table: both come in many different forms, called allotropes. There’s white phosphorus, red phosphorus, violet phosphorus and black phosphorus: and there are about two dozen allotropes of sulfur, with a phase diagram like this: So I should have guessed that sulfur and phosphorus […]

A celebrated building turns 50…and other TED news

Friday, May 05, 21:02 UTC @ TED Blog

Behold, your recap of TED-related news: Habitat turns 50! First conceptualized in 1961 as part of architect Moshe Safdie’s thesis at McGill University, Habitat 67 has gone on to inspire several generations of architects. Combining high-rise living with community connection, Habitat’s concrete cluster of homes challenged the contemporary notions of apartment complexes and Brutalist architecture.

The Meal is Not the Product

Friday, May 05, 19:05 UTC @ tecosystems

There are many reasons that people go out to eat. Some of those reasons involve food; many do not. If you’re going out to watch a game with friends, for example, the number and size of TVs is at least as important as the menu. For a date, the chef is generally important, but so

The Meal is Not the Product

Friday, May 05, 19:05 UTC @ tecosystems

There are many reasons that people go out to eat. Some of those reasons involve food; many do not. If you’re going out to watch a game with friends, for example, the number and size of TVs is at least as important as the menu. For a date, the chef is generally important, but so

Member of the Band – Gorilla Diego Fernandez

Friday, May 05, 18:56 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Diego Fernandez

★ Apple’s China Problem: WeChat

Friday, May 05, 18:37 UTC @ Daring Fireball

Hardware differentiated by *superior, exclusive* software is the key to understanding Apple. And it might explain the iPhone’s sluggish sales in China.

Midlife Crisis of an API Designer

Friday, May 05, 16:08 UTC @ APIDesign - Blogs

I have to admit I am currently at a midlife crisis. I dedicated my last twenty years to promotion of a proper API design. I wrote TheAPIBook, I tried to propagate the principles of good

Q&A with the Great Nephew of Alan Turing

Friday, May 05, 15:47 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Carrying on the legacy of a famous relative is a no easy task, particularly for someone as renown as Alan Turing, who is widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. But this hasn’t stopped his great nephew James Turing and his parents from giving it a go. Several years ago […] The post Q&A with the Great Nephew of Alan Tu

Building software the right way

Friday, May 05, 11:17 UTC @ John D. Cook

Yesterday a friend told me about a software project whose owners said “We’re going to do this the right way.” I told him I have two opposite reactions when I hear that: Ooh, that sounds like fun! Run away! I’ve been on several projects where the sponsors have identified some aspect of the status quo […]

Planet Nine: the score card

Friday, May 05, 00:17 UTC @ The Search for Planet Nine

Gorilla Guide: Essential Steps for IoT Success

Thursday, May 04, 15:49 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

** Note: This post was written by Gorillas Christopher Valerio and Fabian Montealegre Internet of Things (IoT) connects every aspect of our lives to the cloud. We don’t just share cat pictures and baby videos anymore, we live like the Jetsons! A Relatively Simple Problem to Solve To demonstrate our IoT skills, a small band of Gorillas took on a simple problem: What is the most effective way to heat or cool a room based on current ambient temperature? You may ask why we would want to d

In which I sing about Schrödinger’s cat

Thursday, May 04, 15:18 UTC @ Backreaction

You have all been waiting for this. The first ever song about quantum entanglement, Boltzmann brains, and the multiverse: This is the second music video produced in collaboration with Apostolos Vasilidis and Timo Alho, supported by FQXi. (The first is here.) I think these two young artists are awesomely talented! Just by sharing this video you can greatly support them. In this video too,

In which I sing about Schrödinger’s cat

Thursday, May 04, 15:18 UTC @ Backreaction

You have all been waiting for this. The first ever song about quantum entanglement, Boltzmann brains, and the multiverse: This is the second music video produced in collaboration with Apostolos Vasilidis and Timo Alho, supported by FQXi. (The first is here.) I think these two young artists are awesomely talented! Just by sharing this video you can greatly support them. In this video too,

5 of the Best Mac & iOS Dev Conferences in 2017

Thursday, May 04, 15:00 UTC @ Dan Counsell

Early last year I wrote an article on the 7 best dev conferences in 2016. I had planned to do something similar at the start of this year, however, time marched on and it’s now little later than I anticipated.

Summer Conferences

Thursday, May 04, 12:12 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Ahh summer. No Classes. Baseball. Opera Festivals. Time to focus on research and starting a new book. But, of course, many computer scientists travel the world to various conferences. I went to too many last year and trying to cut down but many great options abound. The STOC 2017 Theory Fest, June 19-23 in Montreal, five days of conference talks, tutorials, invited lectures and so much more. Sanjeev Arora

Announcing Second Stage

Thursday, May 04, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Today we announce a little project we have been working on — we are calling it Second Stage. Second Stage is a one day workshop where we share the knowledge gained working with a wide variety of companies over the last several years. Our plan is to host these events all over the world, to spread and share what we know, as we roll out Second Stage. For now, we are starting small — on June 1st 2017 we will be hosting our first Secondary Stage workshop in Denver, Colorado at the Warwick Hotel. F

App Store Sources and App Referrer Data Now Available

Wednesday, May 03, 22:49 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

App Analytics in iTunes Connect now provides insight on where customers discover your app, including App Store browsing and search, within other apps, or on the web. With key metrics based on source types, you can see your top referring apps and websites, making it easier to optimize your marketing campaigns.Learn more about App Analytics.

The 3n+1 problem and Benford’s law

Wednesday, May 03, 12:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

This is the third, and last, of a series of posts on Benford’s law, this time looking at a famous open problem in computer science, the 3n + 1 problem, also known as the Collatz conjecture. Start with a positive integer n. Compute 3n + 1 and divide by 2 repeatedly until you get an odd […]

The IDAR Graph

Wednesday, May 03, 11:46 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

UML is the de facto standard for representing object-oriented designs. It does a fine job of recording designs, but it has a severe problem: its diagrams don't convey what humans need to know, making them hard to understand. This is why most software developers use UML only when forced to. People understand an organization, such as a corporation, in terms of a control hierarchy. When faced with an organization of people or objects, the first question usually is, "What's controlling all this?" Surprisingly,

Proven, Honest, Ways to Make Software Sales – Even if you are a Single Developer | Steli Efti, Close.io | BoS Europe 2016

Wednesday, May 03, 08:49 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Steli Efti, Co-founder & CEO, Close.io Steli Efti is the co-founder and CEO of Close.io. He’s Silicon Valley’s most prominent sales hustler, a YC alumni, advisor to several startups and entrepreneurs and the author of The Ultimate Startup Guide To Outbound Sales. Steli shares some of the tips and tricks he has learned as one […] The post

New committer: Danilo G. Baio (ports)

Wednesday, May 03, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

Theories of Everything

Tuesday, May 02, 18:53 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I’ve written a review for the latest issue of Physics World of a short new book by Frank Close, entitled Theories of Everything. You can read the review here. As I discuss in the review, Close explains a lot of … Continue reading →

Cauchy, Benford, and a problem with NHST

Tuesday, May 02, 15:41 UTC @ John D. Cook

Introduction Samples from a Cauchy distribution nearly follow Benford’s law. I’ll demonstrate this below. The more data you see, the more confident you should be of this. But with a typical statistical approach, crudely applied NHST (null hypothesis significance testing), the more data you see, the less convinced you are. This post assumes you’ve read the […]

Millennial IBM scientists revolutionize cyber security operations from idea to product

Tuesday, May 02, 15:08 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Every year, CareerCast publishes a widely-reported list of the top 10 most stressful jobs. The 2017 list includes some obvious careers including military service, firefighter, and police officer, who risk their lives every day. The list also includes several less life-threatening jobs including TV news broadcaster and taxi driver. But what if you had the […] The post Millennial IBM sc

Lispjobs: Linux systems engineer with Common Lisp experience, m-creations, Mainz, Germany

Tuesday, May 02, 13:40 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Full time position for German speaking Linux admin with Docker and Common Lisp experience near Frankfurt, Germany We are a small German software shop based in Mainz, Germany, founded in 2000. We create custom software solutions for mid-size to big companies in finance/payment, health care, and media research. For some of our customers, we also cover operational aspects of the software lifecycle by creating and running Docker containers in development, test, and

How to Make Swift Mock Objects More Useful

Tuesday, May 02, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

In my talk at try! Swift Tokyo, I explained how to make Swift mock objects. But unless we're careful, they can lead to fragile tests.I've written about my experience of going to try! Swift Tokyo 2017. Now than

Weibull distribution and Benford’s law

Tuesday, May 02, 12:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

Introduction to Benford’s law In 1881, Simon Newcomb noticed that the edges of the first pages in a book of logarithms were dirty while the edges of the later pages were clean. From this he concluded that people were far more likely to look up the logarithms of numbers with leading digit 1 than of […]

Diamondoids

Tuesday, May 02, 05:00 UTC @ Azimuth

I have a new favorite molecule: adamantane. As you probably know, someone is said to be ‘adamant’ if they are unshakeable, immovable, inflexible, unwavering, uncompromising, resolute, resolved, determined, firm, rigid, or steadfast. But ‘adamant’ is also a legendary mineral, and the etymology is the same as that for ‘diamond’. The molecule adamantane, shown above, features […]

This Week in Rust 180

Tuesday, May 02, 04:00 UTC @ This Week in Rust

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved?

Frontier Diary #8: When Worlds Collide

Monday, May 01, 20:34 UTC @ inessential.com

I spent the weekend making a bunch of progress on the compiler. It has two pieces: a tokenizer, which I created by rewriting the original C code (langscan.c) in Swift, and a parser. The parser in OrigFrontier was generated by MacYacc, which is similar to Yacc, which is similar to <

Golden angle

Monday, May 01, 18:55 UTC @ John D. Cook

The golden angle is related to the golden ratio, but it is not as well known. And the relationship is not quite what you might think at first. The golden ratio φ is (1 + √5)/2. A golden rectangle is one in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter side is φ. […]

A Celebration of Computer Science at Harvard in Honor of Harry Lewis's 70th Bday

Monday, May 01, 18:31 UTC @ Computational Complexity

My adviser Harry Lewis turned 70 recently. I blogged about how things have changed since I got my Phd in this post. I now post on A celebration of Computer Science at Harvard in Honor of Harry Lewis's 70th Birthday (for video of all talks in order see:

Time-space trade-offs for triangulating a simple polygon

Monday, May 01, 17:32 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

An $s$-workspace algorithm is an algorithm that has read-only access to the values of the input, write-only access to the output, and only uses $O(s)$ additional words of space. We present a randomized $s$-workspace algorithm for triangulating a simple polygon $P$ of $n$ vertices that runs in $O(n^2/s+n \log n \log^{5} (n/s))$ expected time using $O(s)$ variables, for any $s \leq n$. In particular, when $s \leq \frac{n}{\log n\log^{5}\log n}$ the algorithm runs in $O(n^2/s)$ expected time.

The projection median as a weighted average

Monday, May 01, 17:30 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

The projection median of a set $P$ of $n$ points in $\mathbb{R}^d$ is a robust geometric generalization of the notion of univariate median to higher dimensions. In its original definition, the projection median is expressed as a normalized integral of the medians of the projections of $P$ onto all lines through the origin. We introduce a new definition in which the projection median is expressed as a weighted mean of $P$, and show the equivalence of the two definitions. In addition to providing a definition

What personality classifications have in common

Monday, May 01, 17:22 UTC @ John D. Cook

There are many ways to divide people into four personality types, from the classical—sanguine, choleric, melancholic, and phlegmatic—to contemporary systems such as the DISC profile. The Myers-Briggs system divides people into sixteen personality types. I just recently ran across the “enneagram,” an ancient system for dividing people into nine categories. There’s one thing advocates of […]

Easy memory aides

Monday, May 01, 15:44 UTC @ The Geomblog

Certain memory aides are so ... well.. memorable that they stick in your mind exactly the way they should. Here are three that I've heard of: Keeping track of the Baltic states: I think I heard this from +Fernando Pereira - They are alphabetical in order from north to south. So it's Estonia, Latvia and then Lithuania. Converting between miles and kilometers: This is a

Zach Beane: Common Lisp Standard Draft

Monday, May 01, 13:10 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Common Lisp Standard Draft: This is a nice PDF version of the CL spec built from the final draft TeX sources. There's also a gitlab repo that can be used to reproduce the PDF locally. (Thanks to Rainer Joswig for sharing this on twitter.)

Preserves Superview Layout Margins

Monday, May 01, 09:43 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Ever wondered what the “Preserve Superview Margins” checkbox does in Interface Builder? When should you use it and why does it not seem to do anything most of the time? Here are my notes along with an extra step you will need to make it work with stack views. Layout Margins Here is the super simple setup to make this easy to see. I have a red container view pinned to the leading and trailing edges of the root view of a view controller. A

May-day Pope-hope

Monday, May 01, 07:40 UTC @ Backreaction

Pope Francis meets Stephen Hawking.[Photo: Piximus.] My husband is a Roman Catholic, so is his whole family. I’m a heathen. We’re both atheists, but dear husband has steadfastly refused to leave the church. That he throws out money with the annual “church tax” (imo a great failure of secularization) has been a recurring point of friction between us. But as of recently I’ve stopped bitching

May-day Pope-hope

Monday, May 01, 07:40 UTC @ Backreaction

Pope Francis meets Stephen Hawking.[Photo: Piximus.] My husband is a Roman Catholic, so is his whole family. I’m a heathen. We’re both atheists, but dear husband has steadfastly refused to leave the church. That he throws out money with the annual “church tax” (imo a great failure of secularization) has been a recurring point of friction between us. But as of recently I’ve stopped bitching

A Great Solution

Monday, May 01, 03:23 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

A great conjecture too Alternate photo by Quanta Thomas Royen is a retired professor of statistics in Schwalbach am Taunus near Frankfurt, Germany. In July 2014 he had a one-minute insight about how to prove the famous Gaussian correlation inequality (GCI) conjecture. It took one day for him to draft a full proof of the […]

What isn't a high-performance DSL?

Monday, May 01, 01:45 UTC @ composition.al

At work, I’ve been participating in a series of long-running, broad-ranging discussions about the role that domain-specific languages, or DSLs, can play in helping programmers exploit high-performance parallel hardware. One thing that’s interesting about these discussions is that they reveal what people’s assumptions are about what “DSL” means. For instance, one question that’s come up repeatedly in our discussions is “Is

François-René Rideau: Design at the confluence of programming languages and build systems

Monday, May 01, 00:10 UTC @ Planet Lisp

This short article discusses upcoming changes and future challenges for ASDF, the Common Lisp build system. It also draws lessons for a hypothetical successor to ASDF, for build systems in general, languages in which to write them, and languages that would have an internal build system that could rival with modern build systems. ASDF, "Another System Definition Facility", is the de facto standard build system for Common Lisp (CL)

The Good, the Bad, and the Clients

Monday, May 01, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

The client vetting process is the most important step in business. Not only can a failed project leave your business in the red, it also wastes time, resources, and hurts future prospects. But it is a paradox that the most important step in business be conducted in an expedient manner. The time spent evaluating a client costs time, money and is not directly billable. But what are the best questions to pre-qualify a client? The key to effective client evaluation is identifying the perfect buyer f

All Crunchzilla tutorials now open source

Sunday, April 30, 20:21 UTC @ Geeking with Greg

All the code is now available for all the Crunchzi

Sure, we have imperative and functional. But what about cartesian programming?

Sunday, April 30, 14:24 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

Recently, I've released a small tool to write configurations (repo). The README is pragmatic, just a worked example, and doesn't claim anything extraordinary. However, my ultimate motive was to explore a new programming paradigm, or at least a paradigm that I — being a programmer for three dacades — have never heard of. Describing the world using cartesian products isn't logical programming or object-oriented

Call for talk proposals: DSLDI 2017

Sunday, April 30, 01:30 UTC @ composition.al

This year, Eric Walkingshaw and I are serving as co-chairs of DSLDI, the Domain-Specific Language Design and Implementation workshop, co-located with SPLASH 2017 in beautiful Vancouver, BC. This is my second year being involved with DSLDI, but my firs

In Case You Missed It: The themes that echoed through TED2017

Friday, April 28, 22:58 UTC @ TED Blog

Over the past five days, the TED2017 conference has explored the theme “The Future You.” This has spanned an incredible number of ideas on a huge array of topics. Below, a tour through some of the key themes that emerged — through the week and in the double-stuffed session of day 5. All eyes on […]

The future us: The talks of Session 11 of TED2017

Friday, April 28, 22:53 UTC @ TED Blog

In the final session of TED2017, we look ahead to the future we’ll build together. Below, recaps of the talks from Session 11, in chronological order. A design renaissance for our apps. “There’s a hidden goal driving all of our technology, and that goal is the race for our attention.” says Tristan Harris. He would know; he […]

12 things I know for sure: Anne Lamott speaks at TED2017

Friday, April 28, 21:51 UTC @ TED Blog

Author Anne Lamott recently turned 61. So she’s compiled the following list of “every single true thing I know.” A brief recap: All truth is a paradox. “Life is a precious unfathomably beautiful gift, and it is impossible here,” she says. Life is “filled with heartbreaking sweetness and beauty, floods and babies and acne and Mozart, […]

What will the future look like? Elon Musk speaks at TED2017

Friday, April 28, 21:14 UTC @ TED Blog

In conversation with TED’s Head Curator Chris Anderson, serial entrepreneur and future-builder Elon Musk discusses his new project digging tunnels under LA, Hyperloop, Tesla, SpaceX and his dreams for what the world could look like. Below, highlights from the conversation. Why are you boring? “We’re trying to dig a hole under LA, and this is to […

A beer exchange that spanned the globe

Friday, April 28, 19:23 UTC @ TED Blog

During the International Beer Exchange held on Day 2 of TEDFest, a screening event for TEDx’ers in New York City, bottles were lined up side by side like passengers on the subway during morning rush hour. A pale ale from Vail stood tall next to a stout from Kentucky that had been aged in oak […]

The TED2017 film festival: Shorts from the conference

Friday, April 28, 16:59 UTC @ TED Blog

TED is about speakers stepping on a stage and sharing an idea in 18 minutes or less. But throughout our annual conference, short films play a vital part in the program too — opening sessions and providing moments of pause, reflection and laughter between talks. The short films shown during the conference are selected by Anyssa […]

In Case You Missed It: The personal talks from day 4 of TED2017

Friday, April 28, 04:57 UTC @ TED Blog

On the fourth day of TED, the talks got more personal and packed with takeaways for everyday life. Below, some highlights. Pond scum: a source of wonder. In her ode to the microorganisms we’ve spent a century trying to kill, Anne Madden shared how, in pond scum, scientists found an organism that appears to vaccinate […]

Tales of tomorrow: The talks of Session 10 of TED2017

Friday, April 28, 04:45 UTC @ TED Blog

The stories we tell define us. In the Thursday-night session of TED2017, a singer, an artist, a poet, an author, two podcasters and Bollywood’s biggest star showed us what our stories mean today — and gave a preview of what they’ll look like in the future. Below, recaps of the talks from Session 10, in chronological order. […]

The quest for love and compassion: Shah Rukh Khan speaks at TED2017

Friday, April 28, 02:59 UTC @ TED Blog

“I sell dreams, and I peddle love to millions of people,” says Shah Rukh Khan, Bollywood’s biggest star and the host of the upcoming TED Talks India: Nayi Soch. In a charming, funny, insightful and self-aware talk, Khan traces the movements of his life — and leaves us with hard-earned wisdom. “I’ve been made to understand there [

It’s personal: The talks of Session 9 of TED2017

Friday, April 28, 02:18 UTC @ TED Blog

For the ninth session of TED2017, hosted by TED’s Editorial Director Helen Walters and Curation Director Kelly Stoetzel, we look into ourselves with seven speakers who take on subjects ranging from parenting to social interaction and heartbreak, revealing nuggets of wisdom that just might help you lead a better, more fulfilled life. The longest-running study […]

Heartbreak 101: Guy Winch speaks at TED2017

Friday, April 28, 01:32 UTC @ TED Blog

“Why do the same coping mechanisms that get us through all kinds of life challenges fail us so miserably when our heart gets broken?” asks psychologist Guy Winch. For the past 20 years, Winch has counseled people of all ages reeling from the blow of a breakup, and in this talk, he explains why heartbreak […]

The puzzle of aging: Elizabeth Blackburn speaks at TED2017

Friday, April 28, 01:09 UTC @ TED Blog

For Nobel Prize-winning biologist Elizabeth Blackburn, it all began with pond scum. She was curious about chromosomes, and specifically the caps at the ends of chromosomes, known as telomeres, and pond scum provided an ample supply for her research. Her curiosity sent her on a journey that shed light on one of humanity’s biggest, and oldest, […]

Biology as Information Dynamics (Part 2)

Thursday, April 27, 22:28 UTC @ Azimuth

Here’s a video of the talk I gave at the Stanford Complexity Group: You can see slides here: • Biology as information dynamics. Abstract. If biology is the study of self-replicating entities, and we want to understand the role of information, it makes sense to see how information theory is connected to the ‘replicator equation’ […]

Bugs and bodies: The talks of Session 8 of TED2017

Thursday, April 27, 22:04 UTC @ TED Blog

In the eight session of TED2017, hosted by TED’s Head Curator Chris Anderson, eight speakers — and one unforgettable live jetpack demo — showed us that there’s wonder all around us, from the bugs that live in our backyards and on our skin to the dreams that live inside our minds, waiting to be unleashed. Below, […]

Building bridges and playing with data at the Target social space

Thursday, April 27, 22:02 UTC @ TED Blog

This year at TED, Target is all about building bridges and forging strong connections — literally and figuratively. The Commons — an open, airy minimalist structure — is a truly interactive space that allows TED attendees a moment to recharge away (and above) from the hustle and bustle of the conference. Made from sturdy wood […]

/u/kibwen on 🎉 Announcing Rust 1.17!!

Thursday, April 27, 21:18 UTC @ gilded : rust

Indeed, it was that very event that lent the world to ruin... It had been decades since the last line of C code was erased, and the last C compiler (written, ironically (but unsurprisingly), in Rust) engraved onto a golden disc and launched toward that distant star around which the GooglePepsiMusk Sphere's construction could be faintly observed. To even utter that fell syllable would be met with swift retaliation from the paramilitary Borrow Xekkers (the

Frontier Diary #7: Pretty Much Everything Throws

Thursday, April 27, 20:30 UTC @ inessential.com

A script can throw an error, either intentionally (via the scriptError verb) or by doing something, such as referencing an undefined object, that generates an error. OrigFrontier was written in C, which has no error-throwing mechanism, and so it worked like this: most runtime functions returned a boolean (for success or failure), and the return value was passed in by reference. If there was an error, the function would set a global error variable and return false. The caller would th

Why String Theory is Still Not Even Wrong

Thursday, April 27, 14:02 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

John Horgan recently sent me some questions, and has put them and my answers up at his Scientific American site, under the title Why String Theory is Still Not Even Wrong. My thanks to him for the questions and for … Continue reading →

So Was I

Thursday, April 27, 13:57 UTC @ Computational Complexity

While Bill

FreeBSD-SA-17:04.ipfilter

Thursday, April 27, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD Security Advisories

New committer: Vladimir Kondratyev (src)

Thursday, April 27, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD News Flash

Frontier Diary #6: Ballard, from the Parallel Universe

Wednesday, April 26, 20:04 UTC @ inessential.com

In another universe I didn’t decide to port Frontier — instead, I started over from scratch on an app inspired by Frontier. In that universe, the new scripting language, descended from UserTalk, is called Ballard. And it’s documented.

/u/pcopley on Parallelizing Enjarify in Go and Rust

Wednesday, April 26, 17:19 UTC @ gilded : rust

they're characters from the Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics block Oh my god

Not all publicity is good publicity, not even in science.

Wednesday, April 26, 16:03 UTC @ Backreaction

“Any publicity is good publicity” is a reaction I frequently get to my complaints about flaky science coverage. I find this attitude disturbing, especially when it comes from scientists. [img src: gamedesigndojo.com] To begin with, it’s an idiotic stance towards journalism in general – basically a permission for journalists to write nonsense. Just imagine having the same attitude towards

Not all publicity is good publicity, not even in science.

Wednesday, April 26, 16:03 UTC @ Backreaction

“Any publicity is good publicity” is a reaction I frequently get to my complaints about flaky science coverage. I find this attitude disturbing, especially when it comes from scientists. [img src: gamedesigndojo.com] To begin with, it’s an idiotic stance towards journalism in general – basically a permission for journalists to write nonsense. Just imagine having the same attitude towards

McCLIM: Progress report #7

Wednesday, April 26, 01:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

Dear Community, During this iteration I have worked on the Debugger (system clim-debugger) to bring it closer to sldb: More work on the module is planned with a final goal to integrate it with the Listener and to have it as a default debugger for McCLIM applications. Suggestions on how to improve the interface, testing and he

Programming in Lua now available as an e-book

Tuesday, April 25, 23:55 UTC @ Lua: news

The book "Programming in Lua" (4rd edition) is now available as an e-book through Feisty Duck.

My Microblog

Tuesday, April 25, 21:27 UTC @ inessential.com

I’m on Manton‘s cool new microblogs system. Here’s where you can follow me, once you’re on the system: http://... And here’s my microblog: http://... (Which you can read using RSS, whether you’re on the system or not.) I wrote about three-quarters of my own single-user microblog system — and then stopped because I didn’t feel like running a server and bec

Frontier Diary #5: Values and Progress on the Language

Tuesday, April 25, 20:26 UTC @ inessential.com

I put the Frontier repository up on GitHub. (The build is currently broken. This is bad discipline, but since it’s still just me, I forgive myself. Sometimes I run out of time and I just commit what I have.) The repo has my new code and it also contains FrontierOrigFork, which is the original Frontier source with a bunch of deletions and some changes

The Observer Effect

Tuesday, April 25, 16:29 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

The problem is a failure to appreciate just what you are asking a system to do when polling it for information. Modern systems contain thousands of values that can be measured and recorded. Blindly retrieving whatever it is that might be exposed by the system is bad enough, but asking for it with a high-frequency poll is much worse.

The Flame Challenge – explaining complex science to an 11-year-old

Tuesday, April 25, 15:13 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University trains scientists and health professionals to communicate more effectively with the public. I helped found the Alda Center after a stint hosting “Scientific American Frontiers,” the PBS show dedicated to explored cutting-edge advances in science and technology. As we shot the show, I really […] The post The Flame Challenge – expla

Denver airport, Weierstrass, and A&S

Tuesday, April 25, 14:45 UTC @ John D. Cook

Last night I was driving toward the Denver airport and the airport reminded me of the cover of Abramowitz and Stegun’s Handbook of Mathematical Functions. Here’s the airport: And here’s the book cover: I’ve written about the image on book cover before. Someone asked me what function it graphed and I decided it was probably […]

Counting and enumerating crossing-free geometric graphs

Tuesday, April 25, 13:51 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

We describe a framework for constructing data structures which allow fast counting and enumeration of various types of crossing-free geometric graphs on a planar point set. The framework generalizes ideas of Alvarez and Seidel, who used them to count triangulations in time $O(2^nn^2)$ where $n$ is the number of points. The main idea is to represent geometric graphs as source-sink paths in a directed acyclic graph.The following results will emerge. The number of all crossing-free geometric graphs c

On interference among moving sensors and related problems

Tuesday, April 25, 13:08 UTC @ Journal of Computational Geometry

We show that for any set of $n$ moving points in $\Re^d$ and any parameter $2 \le k \le n$, one can select a fixed non-empty subset of the points of size $O(k \log k)$, such that the Voronoi diagram of this subset is ``balanced'' at any given time (i.e., it contains $O(n/k)$ points per cell). We also show that the bound $O(k \log k)$ is near optimal even for the one dimensional case in which points move linearly in time. As an application, we show that one can assign communication radii to the sensors of

★ Judging Apple Watch’s Success

Monday, April 24, 22:28 UTC @ Daring Fireball

These two facts are both true: Apple Watch sales are a rounding error compared to the iPhone, and Apple Watch is a smash hit compared to traditional watches and other wearable devices.

I was at the March for Science on Saturday

Monday, April 24, 21:09 UTC @ Computational Complexity

(Will blog on Harry Lewis's 70th Bday next week-- Today's post is more time sensitive.) I was on the March for Science on April 22. Here are some Kolmogorov random comments 1) Why should I go to it? One less person there would not have matters. AH- but if they all think that then nobody goes. The Classic Voting Paradox- why vote if the chance that your vote matters is so small (even less so in my state- Maryland is one of the Bluest States). In the case of the March For Science th

Adding Playgrounds to Xcode Projects

Monday, April 24, 13:04 UTC @ Use Your Loaf

Playgrounds are a great way to try out ideas but I have tended to use them standalone. They also make great companions when added to your Xcode projects. I especially like being able to use the playground live view to preview view and layout code without the need for Interface Builder. Unfortunately a playground does not automatically get access to the code and resources of a project. Getting it all setup the first time is a pain so for future reference here is my step-by-step guide.

Swift Source Compatibility Test Suite Now Available

Monday, April 24, 13:01 UTC @ Swift.org

We are pleased to announce the release of a new Swift source compatibility test suite as part of the effort to maintain source compatibility in future Swift releases. The source compatibility test suite is community driven, meaning open source project owners can submit their projects for inclusion in the suite. Instructions for adding open source projects to the test suite can be found in the Swift Sou

★ On Uber’s ‘Identifying and Tagging’ of iPhones

Monday, April 24, 00:54 UTC @ Daring Fireball

A lot of people are jumping to the conclusion that Uber was somehow tracking the location of users even after they deleted the Uber app, but the word “track” only appears in the article in the context of Kalanick having “excelled at running track and playing football” in high school.

Complexity Theory and Evolution in Economics

Monday, April 24, 00:52 UTC @ Azimuth

This book looks interesting: • David S. Wilson and Alan Kirman, editors, Complexity and Evolution: Toward a New Synthesis for Economics, MIT Press, Cambridge Mass., 2016. You can get some chapters for free here. I’ve only looked carefully at this one: • Joshua M. Epstein and Julia Chelen, Advancing Agent_Zero. Agent_Zero is a simple toy […]

Lua at the Museum of Tomorrow

Sunday, April 23, 23:27 UTC @ Lua: news

Lua features in the "Inovanças - Creations Brazilian style" exhibition at the Museum of Tomorrow in Rio.

photostream 108

Sunday, April 23, 14:16 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Alex Knob Trail, Franz-Josef Glacier, New Zealand

/u/eeeeeta on Installing rust on OS X 10.4?

Sunday, April 23, 10:57 UTC @ gilded : rust

Try the Ubuntu or Debian netinstall ISO. Worked like a charm for me, managed to install latest Ubuntu on a Core 2 Duo iMac. (Ran fine with GNOME, pretty speedy as well, until the graphics card sadly crapped out.) Ethernet connection required, but it works A+ once you get it installed!

I’d Like to Request a Review Prompt, Please

Friday, April 21, 18:35 UTC @ Joe's Blog

While working on my latest update of Fin, I spent a bit of time playing with Apple’s new SKStoreReviewController API. For those unfamiliar, this new API was announced with the early betas of iOS 10.3, and it went live with the 10.3 release last month. Though it isn’t the only approved way to prompt a read more »

Quantum’s advantage solves black box bit riddle

Friday, April 21, 17:45 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

How IBM Q learns parity with noise Quantum theory met practice in the Nature Quantum Information paper, “Demonstration of quantum advantage in machine learning” when colleagues at IBM Research and I collaborated with scientists at Raytheon BBN to demonstrate one of the first proven examples of a quantum computer’s advantage over a classical computer. By […] The post Quantum’s advantage solves black

Member of the Band – Gorilla Dennis Zamora

Friday, April 21, 16:04 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Dennis Zamora

Making Trend Spotting Help Your Future Business | Eva Pascoe, The Retail Practice | BoS Europe 2016

Friday, April 21, 14:25 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Eva Pascoe, Director of Ecommerce, The Retail Practice So much of what we take for granted today has only just been invented, some of it by Eva. Eva’s career has been built off the back of spotting and acting on emerging trends and she knows stuff! Eva founded the world’s first Internet Cafe – where David […] The post Making Tren

No, physicists have not created “negative mass”

Friday, April 21, 11:04 UTC @ Backreaction

Thanks to BBC, I will now for several years get emails from know-it-alls who think physicists are idiots not to realize the expansion of the universe is caused by negative mass. Because that negative mass, you must know, has actually been created in the lab: The Independent declares this turns physics “completely upside down” And if you think that was crappy science journalism, The

No, physicists have not created “negative mass”

Friday, April 21, 11:04 UTC @ Backreaction

Thanks to BBC, I will now for several years get emails from know-it-alls who think physicists are idiots not to realize the expansion of the universe is caused by negative mass. Because that negative mass, you must know, has actually been created in the lab: The Independent declares this turns physics “completely upside down” And if you think that was crappy science journalism, The

Theory Fest—Should You Go?

Friday, April 21, 04:35 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Theory Fest—Should You Go? Boaz Barak and Michael Mitzenmacher are well known for many great results. They are currently working not on a theory paper, but on a joint “experiment” called Theory Fest. Today Ken and I want to discuss their upcoming experiment and spur you to consider attending it. There are many pros and […]

Two Pet Peeves

Friday, April 21, 01:42 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

I was reminded of two of my pet peeves while taking a look at the appendix A of this paper. As a public service to physicists I thought I’d go on about them here, and provide some advice to the … Continue reading →

Will talk about Harry Lewis 70th bday conference later but for now- that was then/this is now

Thursday, April 20, 22:28 UTC @ Computational Complexity

On Wed April 19 I was at the Harry Lewis 70th birthday celebration! I will blog on that later. Harry Lewis was my thesis adviser. Odd to use the past tense- I DID finish my thesis with him and so he IS my adviser? Anyway, I will do a blog about the celebration next week. This week I ponder- what was different then and now (I got my PhD in 1985). False predictions that I made in 1985: 1) CS depts all have different views of what a CS major shoul

Introducing LivePhotosKit JS

Thursday, April 20, 18:00 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

This new JavaScript-based API makes it easy to embed Live Photos on your websites. In addition to enabling Live Photos on iOS and macOS, you can now let users display their Live Photos on the web. Learn more about Live Photos.

Resisting simplicity

Thursday, April 20, 15:05 UTC @ John D. Cook

As much as we admire simplicity and strive for simplicity, something in us isn’t happy when we achieve it. Sometimes we’re disappointed with a simple solution because, although we don’t realize it yet, we didn’t properly frame the problem it solves. I’ve been in numerous conversations where someone says effectively, “I understand that 2+3 = […]

Spotting Diabetic Retinopathy by analyzing medical images pixel by pixel

Thursday, April 20, 09:45 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Medical images are a rich source of data for clinicians in their diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In fact, specialized fundus photography can help pinpoint tiny pathologies in the eyes of diabetics, revealing signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the world’s leading causes of blindness. In the vast majority of these cases, early detection […] The post Spotting Diabetic Retinopathy by

3 IT Software Trends for 2017-2018

Thursday, April 20, 01:10 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

2016 was a volatile year for everything, it seems. While the galaxy of human attention continues to reorganize around the supermassive black hole of the internet, dark webs are also exerting influence that we are only now discovering. Sometimes it seems that polarization permeates every pore, meanness dominates every mode of discourse – and that’s just deciding which news to read. Which leads me to ask, as

Type Systems as Macros

Wednesday, April 19, 23:38 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

Type Systems as Macros, by Stephen Chang, Alex Knauth, Ben Greenman: We present TURNSTILE, a metalanguage for creating typed embedded languages. To implement the type system, programmers write type checking rules resembling traditional judgment syntax. To implement the semantics, they incorporate elaborations into these rules. TURNSTILE critically depends on the idea of linguistic reuse. It exploits a macro

Search Ads is Expanding to the UK, Australia, and New Zealand

Wednesday, April 19, 23:30 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

Starting April 25, 2017 at 10 a.m. PDT, Search Ads will be available on the App Store in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand, providing an efficient and easy way to promote your app at the top of relevant search results in more markets. Get started with your campaigns today.Learn more about Search Ads.

How to: Have your AI assistant work with a human assistant

Wednesday, April 19, 18:37 UTC @ x.ai

Secretaries have (blessedly) gone the way of the Dodo. Executive assistants are a rare breed, but they remain a fixture of the C-Suite at major corporations and even smaller firms, … View Article The post How to: Have your AI assistant work with a human assistant appeared first on

Catching Light – New Video!

Wednesday, April 19, 14:00 UTC @ Backreaction

I have many shortcomings, like leaving people uncertain whether they’re supposed to laugh or not. But you can’t blame me for lack of vision. I see a future in which science has become a cultural good, like sports, music, and movies. We’re not quite there yet, but thanks to the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) we’re a step closer today. This is the first music video in a series of

Catching Light – New Video!

Wednesday, April 19, 14:00 UTC @ Backreaction

I have many shortcomings, like leaving people uncertain whether they’re supposed to laugh or not. But you can’t blame me for lack of vision. I see a future in which science has become a cultural good, like sports, music, and movies. We’re not quite there yet, but thanks to the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) we’re a step closer today. This is the first music video in a series of

FINally

Wednesday, April 19, 13:45 UTC @ Joe's Blog

Fin 4.0 is available starting today. Two major new features I want to point out here. The first is running a timer on multiple iOS devices. Connect your iPhone and iPad, for instance, and start a single timer on both. This is great for when you have a speaker on stage, and an audio-visual table read more »

TheoryFest at STOC 2017.

Wednesday, April 19, 06:51 UTC @ The Geomblog

(ed: I can't believe it's been four months since my last post. Granted, I've been posting over at algorithmicfairness.wordpress.com, but still. Time to turn in my theory card...) One of the things I've been doing is helping out with the STOC TheoryFest this summer. Specifically, I've been on the plenary talks committee that was tasked with identifying interesting papers from other parts of CS and beyond that might be interesting for a STOC audience to hear about. After many months o

Stanford Complexity Group

Wednesday, April 19, 05:06 UTC @ Azimuth

Aaron Goodman of the Stanford Complexity Group invited me to give a talk there on Thursday April 20th. If you’re nearby—like in Silicon Valley—please drop by! It will be in Clark S361 at 4:20 pm. Here’s the idea. Everyone likes to say that biology is all about information. There’s something true about this—just think about […]

Build your own Instagram using React Native

Tuesday, April 18, 18:19 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

React and React Native have been out for awhile now. They are here to stay and have been a total game changer. If you look at this blog post on StackOverflow about the job trends for this year, it confirms that knowing React is a must if you want to keep up with current tech trends and best practices. This is why I decided to learn React, and, because most of the things I’ve been doing for the last 3 years are mobile

Flying through a 3D fractal

Tuesday, April 18, 17:24 UTC @ John D. Cook

A Menger sponge is created by starting with a cube a recursively removing chunks of it. Draw a 3×3 grid on one face of the cube, then remove the middle square, all the way through the cube. Then do the same for each of the eight remaining squares. Repeat this process over and over, and do it […]

Computing harmonic numbers

Tuesday, April 18, 12:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

The harmonic numbers are defined by Harmonic numbers are sort of a discrete analog of logarithms since As n goes to infinity, the difference between Hn and log n is Euler’s constant γ = 0.57721… [1] How would you compute Hn? For small n, simply use the definition. But if n is very large, there’s a way […]

Understanding Machine Learning

Monday, April 17, 21:02 UTC @ Computational Complexity

Today Georgia Tech had the launch event for our new Machine Learning Center. A panel discussion talked about different challenges in machine learning across the whole university but one common theme emerged: Many machine learning algorithms seem to work very well but we don't know why. If you look at a neural net (basically a weighted circuit of threshold gates) trained for say voice recognition, it's very hard to understand why it makes the choices it makes. Obfuscation

Vsevolod Dyomkin: Pretty-Printing Trees

Monday, April 17, 19:09 UTC @ Planet Lisp

(or The Ugliest Code I've Ever Written) In the last couple of days, I was ill and had to stay in bed, so I've used this time also to tidy up the work that accumulated over the past year in

/u/eeeeeta on This Period of Time in Dieseq #0

Monday, April 17, 17:40 UTC @ gilded : rust

Maybe try fiddling about with gtk::DrawingArea? You might have to use gtk-rs's -sys bindings to directly use the C API, but I think you could probably combine it with cairo-rs (which is part of the same gtk-rs project) and adapt code from this GTK

Book review: “A Big Bang in a Little Room” by Zeeya Merali

Monday, April 17, 17:05 UTC @ Backreaction

A Big Bang in a Little Room: The Quest to Create New Universes Zeeya Merali Basic Books (February 14, 2017) When I heard that Zeeya Merali had written a book, I expected something like a Worst Of New Scientist compilation. But A Big Bang in A Little Room turned out to be both interesting and enjoyable, if maybe not for the reason the author intended. If you follow the popular science news on

Book review: “A Big Bang in a Little Room” by Zeeya Merali

Monday, April 17, 17:05 UTC @ Backreaction

A Big Bang in a Little Room: The Quest to Create New Universes Zeeya Merali Basic Books (February 14, 2017) When I heard that Zeeya Merali had written a book, I expected something like a Worst Of New Scientist compilation. But A Big Bang in A Little Room turned out to be both interesting and enjoyable, if maybe not for the reason the author intended. If you follow the popular science news on

How we manage technologists at x.ai

Monday, April 17, 16:23 UTC @ x.ai

At x.ai we think some things are worth innovating (product!), and some things aren’t (business model). This measured approach extends to how we manage our technologists—in this area we do … View Article The post How we manage technologists at x.ai appeared first on x.ai.

Technical notes and other relatively hidden content

Monday, April 17, 12:54 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ve written quite a few pages that are separate from the timeline of the blog. These are a little hidden, not because I want to hide them, but because you can’t make everything equally easy to find. These notes cover a variety of topics: Math diagrams Numerical computing Probability and approximations Differential equations Python Regular expressions […]

Quick Links

Monday, April 17, 00:08 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

A few quick items: I was very sorry to hear recently of the death of David Goss (obituary here), a mathematician specialist in function fields who was at Ohio State. David had a side interest in physics and was a … Continue reading →

Staying Competitive with App Updates

Monday, April 17, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

With millions of apps available in the Google Play and Apple App Store we are often asked by our clients and partners how to keep their apps competitive, functional, and most of all highly rated. Like changing the oil on your car, keeping your app up to date can save a lot of pain down the road. A neglected app not only will see a sharp drop off in its user-base and positive reviews, but will also create a lot of technical debt that only becomes harder to fix as time passes. Many of the most popular apps

Viticulture and The Gallerist

Sunday, April 16, 11:08 UTC @ Martin Fowler

In latter half of last year, I bought two board games: Viticulture and The Gallerist. I've enjoyed them both, and have been struck by their similarities. Enough to inspire me to write this note comparing the two of them. They both have a strong theme of running a business with a primary production path

Save $300 on CocoaConf Next Door

Friday, April 14, 20:53 UTC @ inessential.com

My pals at CocoaConf asked me to remind you that the Early Bird sale ends in two weeks for CocoaConf Next Door — the one taking place in San Jose during WWDC. I’ll be there. At least in the afternoons. Check out the speakers list. Yummy, chewy, nutty speakers list.

Frontier Diary #4: The QuickDraw Problem and Where It Led Me

Friday, April 14, 20:14 UTC @ inessential.com

In my fork of Frontier there are still over 600 deprecation warnings. A whole bunch of these are due to QuickDraw calls. For those who don’t know: QuickDraw was how, in the old days, you drew things to the Mac’s screen. It was amazing for its time and pretty easy to work with. Functions included things like MoveTo, LineTo, DrawLine, FrameOval, and so on. All pretty straightforward.

Member of the Band – Gorilla Sol Lam

Friday, April 14, 19:01 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Much like a pod of whales or a pack of wolves, did you know that a group of gorillas is called a band? In this blog series, we’re going to introduce you to members of our band – engineers, technical recruiters, PMs, designers, and more who make up the most important asset in Gorilla Logic…our talent! Are you Gorilla material? Join the band today! Sol Lam

Eugene Zaikonnikov: About Time

Friday, April 14, 15:00 UTC @ Planet Lisp

This week I put together a small NTP client. To keep dependencies at minimum and to avoid forcing a permanently running process onto users, it does not attempt to adjust system RTC clock, compensate jitter or evaluate time server quality. As I see it, much of that behaviour is easy enough to add via mixins with the defined NTP class. NTP timestamp is two 32-bit values: seconds and fraction of a second. N

You asked scientist Jessie Rosenberg anything about silicon photonics

Friday, April 14, 14:59 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Here’s what she said about flying qubits, wafer-scale photonic test systems, and more Silicon photonics uses light, versus electricity, to send signals from a microchip. IBM engineers use these pulses of light to increase the connectivity and bandwidth between datacenters for faster data transfer over longer distances. But silicon photonics isn’t just for datacenters. IBM […] The post You asked scient

Frontier Diary #3: Built-in Verbs Configuration

Friday, April 14, 05:25 UTC @ inessential.com

Frontier’s standard library is known as its built-in verbs. There are a number of different tables: file, clock, xml, and so on. Each contains a number of verbs: file.readWholeFile, clock.now, and so on. Most of these verbs are implemented in C, in the kernel, rather than as scripts. At the moment, to add one of these kernel verbs, you have to jump through a few hoops: edit a resource, add an integer ID, add to a switch statement,

/u/jnordwick on Moving to TCPStream, Bye Tokio! – Adventures in Rust

Friday, April 14, 01:08 UTC @ gilded : rust

I have a very strong opinion that pretty much all of Rust's network IO is at very wrong abstraction levels. Everybody keeps trying to build these tall stacks include the kitchen sink, but rust still lacks the basic groundwork. About a year ago I wanted to work on an event loop that needed non-blocking io. It is a pattern I've down a dozen times in Java, a few in Python, a few in C++, and probably a couple I'm missing. There was no easy way to do th

Swift Scripting in the Wild

Thursday, April 13, 18:22 UTC @ Gorilla Logic

Swift scripting is awesome. Third party libraries that include references to APIs requiring usage descriptions, without disclosing that information to their users, are less awesome. I recently experienced this very situation and thought it would be a good excuse to use swift scripting to address my problem. (If you aren’t interested in reading my rant and just want to get to the fun of scripting, click here now).  I would like to begin by stating the obvious

The Road to Abstraction

Thursday, April 13, 18:04 UTC @ tecosystems

Computers are hard, which is why it’s no surprise that one of the long running trends over the history of the technology industry is abstraction. From machine code to Assembler to COBOL, even the earliest platform implementations have exhibited a tendency to progress incrementally away from low level primitives, which are non-intuitive to human beings

The Road to Abstraction

Thursday, April 13, 18:04 UTC @ tecosystems

Computers are hard, which is why it’s no surprise that one of the long running trends over the history of the technology industry is abstraction. From machine code to Assembler to COBOL, even the earliest platform implementations have exhibited a tendency to progress incrementally away from low level primitives, which are non-intuitive to human beings

The short arm of coincidence

Thursday, April 13, 15:40 UTC @ bit-player

James Tanton tosses off number theory problems the way John D. Rockefeller handed out dimes. I wrote about one of Tanton’s problems back in January. Then a few weeks ago this tweet about factorials and squares snagged my attention, and … Continue reading →

5 Stars, or GTFO

Thursday, April 13, 12:30 UTC @ Joe's Blog

Furthermore, this shows just how dishonest these rankings are. If you’re aware of the preposterously high standards Postmates, Uber, and Lyft set, you’re much less likely to give a three- or four-star rating if your experience is imperfect — you don’t want to be the user who causes the contractor to lose their job. —via read more »

Alice and Bob and Pat and Vanna

Thursday, April 13, 12:07 UTC @ Computational Complexity

"The only useful thing computer science has given us is Alice and Bob" - A physicist at a 1999 quantum computing workshop Alice and Bob, g

Why doesn’t anti-matter anti-gravitate?

Wednesday, April 12, 16:01 UTC @ Backreaction

Flying pig.[Image: clipartfest.com] Why aren’t there any particles that fall up in the gravitational field of Earth? It would be so handy – If I had to move the couch, rather than waiting for the husband to flex his muscles, I’d just tie an anti-gravitating weight to it and the couch would float to the other side of the room. Newton’s law of gravity and Coulomb’s law for the electric force

Why doesn’t anti-matter anti-gravitate?

Wednesday, April 12, 16:01 UTC @ Backreaction

Flying pig.[Image: clipartfest.com] Why aren’t there any particles that fall up in the gravitational field of Earth? It would be so handy – If I had to move the couch, rather than waiting for the husband to flex his muscles, I’d just tie an anti-gravitating weight to it and the couch would float to the other side of the room. Newton’s law of gravity and Coulomb’s law for the electric force

The biggest lies about creativity and other stories with Scott Berkun

Wednesday, April 12, 11:52 UTC @ Business of Software USA

We caught up with Scott Berkun, author of Dance of the Possible, the mostly honest completely irreverent guide to creativity and asked him anything. We tried hard to keep to the topic of creativity… Here are some of the highlights… You can watch here though due to technical problems (leaves on the line), Scott Berkun’s video […] The post The

FreeBSD-SA-17:03.ntp

Wednesday, April 12, 08:00 UTC @ FreeBSD Security Advisories

/u/tafia97300 on Performance help on rs-poker

Wednesday, April 12, 03:00 UTC @ gilded : rust

Why not using u16 instead of u32? For rank_straight, have you tried comparing several masks at once using simd crate? For instance you could probably use u16x8?

/u/Cocalus on Performance help on rs-poker

Tuesday, April 11, 23:30 UTC @ gilded : rust

I only glanced over the first bit but with the rank_straight, I assume all but one of the bit patterns has 5 continuous bits set. In that case you can shift by trailing_zeros, then compare if it's equal to 0b11111. The amount you shift by can probably be used to figure out the ranking. Then the one remaining aces case can be checked with your current method. It's possible that the optional create might be more performat when you're returning Option<u32

Big oil’s next gusher is at the nanoscale

Tuesday, April 11, 22:14 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Last year the world consumed almost 97 million barrels of oil per day. What if I told you that many more barrels still remain in those same wells? Deep inside the rock, 60 percent and more of a reservoir’s oil remains trapped in capillaries which are sometimes only tens to hundreds of nanometers wide (For […] The post Big oil’s next gusher is at the nanoscale appeared first on

What’s New in TestFlight

Tuesday, April 11, 20:40 UTC @ News and Updates - Apple Developer

TestFlight in iTunes Connect now provides multiple build support, enhanced group capabilities, and improved tester management—making it even easier to test your apps.Multiple BuildsTestFlight now lets you distribute and test multiple builds at the same time, so testers can choose from a number of builds to test.GroupsTestFlight groups have changed. You can now do more with them, like create groups of TestFlight users, and each group can test a different build. To get you started, we’ve added all of your

Frontier Diary #2: Two Good Ideas that Aren’t Good Anymore

Tuesday, April 11, 20:01 UTC @ inessential.com

Strings in Frontier are usually either Pascal strings or Handles. You probably don’t know what I’m talking about. I’ll explain. Pascal Strings Frontier is a Mac Toolbox app that’s been Carbonized just enough to run on OS X. You may recall that the Mac Toolbox was written so long ago that the ori

Monitoring Parkinson’s disease with sensors and analytics to improve clinical trials

Tuesday, April 11, 13:06 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

One year ago, IBM and Pfizer announced a partnership, Project BlueSky, aiming to develop a system to improve how clinical trials are conducted for Parkinson’s disease (PD) drugs in development. Over the last 12 months, the interdisciplinary team from both companies has made great strides in building and deploying new technology to automatically assess the […] The post Monitoring Parkinson’s

100% Coverage of Edge Cases: How to Safely Parse JSON

Tuesday, April 11, 12:45 UTC @ Quality Coding

We can parse JSON not as a single black box, but as a series of problems. Testable design supports TDD for 100% coverage with simple unit tests.How can we unit test JSON parsing, handling every possible error? Can w

Perks vs Culture: The Ping Pong Table Fallacy | Promise Phelon, TapInfluence | BoS USA 2016

Tuesday, April 11, 08:22 UTC @ Business of Software USA

Promise Phelon, CEO, TapInfluence Promise Phelon discusses Silicon Valley culture, being black in Boulder, the role of the CEO and why perks are just the tip of the culture iceberg. A sustainable business culture is only possible if you consider what is below the surface first. It’s too easy to confuse perks – 401k, travel, […] The post Perks v

New Twitter icons

Tuesday, April 11, 03:46 UTC @ John D. Cook

I’ve updated the icons for my Twitter accounts.

What is William Rowan Hamilton know for- for us? for everyone else?

Monday, April 10, 21:11 UTC @ Computational Complexity

I found the song William Rowan Hamilton that I used in my April fools day post because I was working on a song about Hamiltonian Circuits to the tune of Alexander Hamilton Circuit Hamiltonian I want a Circuit Hamiltonian And I'm run-ing a pro-GRAM for it So I wait, so I wait (Darling said: Don't quit your day job.) I noticed that William Rowan Hamilton

How to: Have your AI assistant send invites for meetings with pre-set times

Monday, April 10, 18:37 UTC @ x.ai

Sometimes you arrange to meet someone offline and quickly find a day and time. Other times you know exactly when you’d like to set up a call or grab a … View Article The post How to: Have your AI assistant send invites for meetings with pre-set times appe

Mercury and the bandwagon effect

Sunday, April 09, 18:00 UTC @ John D. Cook

The study of the planet Mercury provides two examples of the bandwagon effect. In her new book Worlds Fantastic, Worlds Familiar, planetary astronomer Bonnie Buratti writes The study of Mercury … illustrates one of the most confounding bugaboos of the scientific method: the bandwagon effect. Scientists are only human, and they impose their own prejudices […]

Turing Award 2016

Saturday, April 08, 00:27 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

It takes a … Sir Tim Berners-Lee is the latest winner of the ACM Turing Award. He was cited for “inventing the World Wide Web (WWW), the first web browser, and the fundamental protocols and algorithms allowing the web to scale.” Today we congratulate Sir Tim on his award and review the work by which […]

The Social Bubble of Physics

Friday, April 07, 21:06 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Sabine Hossenfelder is on a tear this week, with two excellent and highly provocative pieces about research practice in theoretical physics, a topic on which she has become the field’s most perceptive critic. The first is in this month’s Nature … Continue reading →

Debugging Swift: Error in Auto-Import

Friday, April 07, 17:22 UTC @ Indie Stack

Have you ever tried debugging Swift code in an embedded framework, and met resistance from lldb in the form of a cryptic AST context error? error: in auto-import: failed to get module 'RSAppKit' from AST context: <module-includes>:1:9: note: in file included from <module-includes>:1: #import "Headers/RSAppKit.h" ^ error: [...]/RSAppKit.h:1:9: error: 'RSAppKit/SomeHeader.h' file not found #import <RSAppKit/SomeHeader.h> …

Swift Package Manager macOS deployment target override

Friday, April 07, 16:54 UTC @ Ole Begemann

Swift 3.1 fixes a bug in the Swift Package Manager that prevented overriding the macOS deployment target. When you run swift build on macOS, the package manager currently (as of Swift 3.0 and 3.1) hardcodes the deployment target to macOS 10.10.1 In Swift 3.0 it

Featured patent: Machine learning models for drug discovery

Friday, April 07, 13:08 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The desire to improve people’s health and lives inspires us as inventors. Drug discovery is a time-consuming and laborious process. By conservative estimates, it now takes at least 10 to 15 years and $500 million to $2 billion to bring a single drug to market. Furthermore, there is a widening productivity gap: research and development […] The post Featured patent: Machine learning mo

Book review reviewed: “The Particle Zoo” by Gavin Hesketh

Friday, April 07, 10:37 UTC @ Backreaction

The Particle Zoo: The Search for the Fundamental Nature of Reality By Gavin Hesketh Paperback Edition Quercus (15 Jun. 2017) A few weeks ago, I reviewed Gavin Hesketh’s book The Particle Zoo. I found his introduction to quantum field theory very well done. Considering that he can’t rely on equations, Hesketh gets across a lot of details (notably, what Feynman diagrams do and don’t depict).

Book review reviewed: “The Particle Zoo” by Gavin Hesketh

Friday, April 07, 10:37 UTC @ Backreaction

The Particle Zoo: The Search for the Fundamental Nature of Reality By Gavin Hesketh Paperback Edition Quercus (15 Jun. 2017) A few weeks ago, I reviewed Gavin Hesketh’s book The Particle Zoo. I found his introduction to quantum field theory very well done. Considering that he can’t rely on equations, Hesketh gets across a lot of details (notably, what Feynman diagrams do and don’t depict).

OSX: Fix build with recent XCode.

Friday, April 07, 09:59 UTC @ Recent commits to luajit-2.0

Contributed by Joseph Zupko.

Why is my TCP not reliable (expert edition)

Friday, April 07, 04:55 UTC @ 250bpm-blogs

The shortcomings of TCP connection termination have been described many times. If you are not familiar with those problems here's an example of an article that focuses on the problem. However, there's one special use case that is rarely, if ever, discussed. Imagine a TCP client wanting to shut down its TCP connection to server cleanly. It wants to

why are there so many linear algebra crates? Which one is "best"?

Thursday, April 06, 23:52 UTC @ gilded : rust

CALLING ALL DATA TYPE LIBRARY MAINTAINERS: I would like your opinion! I have created an issue on "are we learning yet" to try and hash out a common conversion API that could be supported by all rust libraries and we would like your opinion! I am looking to dive into basic machine learning, so naturally I went searching for a linear algebra library. I found (at least) 3:

From IoT and vines grow the fruits of innovation

Thursday, April 06, 18:44 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Innovation is a company principle shared by both IBM and E. & J. Gallo Winery, the world’s largest family-owned winery, headquartered in Modesto, California. While the Internet of Things (IoT) and wine don’t seem like obvious partners, the two companies found a common purpose focused on growing the best quality grapes while optimizing the amount […] The post From IoT and vines grow the fruits of

IBM Research AI technology auto-curates golf highlights at the 2017 Masters Tournament

Thursday, April 06, 16:58 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

The tremendous growth of video data — including media content, sports broadcasts, educational video, consumer content, news and more — has created a significant demand for artificial intelligence (AI) tools that can automatically understand visual content to facilitate effective curation and searching of large video collections. Our team at IBM Research is creating core technologies […] The post

Periodic Patterns in Peptide Masses

Thursday, April 06, 16:20 UTC @ Azimuth

Gheorghe Craciun is a mathematician at the University of Wisconsin who recently proved the Global Attractor Conjecture, which since 1974 was the most famous conjecture in mathematical chemistry. This week he visited U. C. Riverside and gave a talk on this subject. But he also told me about something else—something quite remarkable. The mystery A […]

/u/ppartim on The Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer

Thursday, April 06, 15:33 UTC @ gilded : rust

First, I am not sure why you are being voted down. You are voicing a commonly held point of view. I’d rather we tried and convince you that an alternative is a worthwhile endeavor rather then get you shushed away. Leaving aside the fact that at least I prefer a friendly and polite place over a blunt, direct one, I think there’s two somewhat economical parts to this: One is to make people feel welcome and their contributions valued. In particular, people who don

A Bridge Too Far

Thursday, April 06, 12:44 UTC @ Computational Complexity

In Atlanta last week a fire destroyed a major highway bridge

Soy el gris

Thursday, April 06, 10:08 UTC @ brucknerite

Soy el gris. Si no me conoces solo soy un color. Un matiz neutro de luz. Una estación en el camino del blanco al negro. Pero si me conoces soy mucho más. Soy el gris. Te diré qué soy. Soy el humo denso que ahoga la felicidad. Soy la niebla fría que envuelve la mente. … Continúa leyendo Soy el gris

Dear Dr. B: Why do physicists worry so much about the black hole information paradox?

Thursday, April 06, 09:49 UTC @ Backreaction

“Dear Dr. B, Why do physicists worry so much about the black hole information paradox, since it looks like there are several, more mundane processes that are also not reversible? One obvious example is the increase of the entropy in an isolated system and another one is performing a measurement according to quantum mechanics. Regards, Petteri” Dear Petteri, This is a very good question.

Dear Dr. B: Why do physicists worry so much about the black hole information paradox?

Thursday, April 06, 09:49 UTC @ Backreaction

“Dear Dr. B, Why do physicists worry so much about the black hole information paradox, since it looks like there are several, more mundane processes that are also not reversible? One obvious example is the increase of the entropy in an isolated system and another one is performing a measurement according to quantum mechanics. Regards, Petteri” Dear Petteri, This is a very good question.

The Rust+GNOME Hackfest in Mexico City, part 1

Thursday, April 06, 03:22 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/assertion_error [link] [comments]

Applied Category Theory

Thursday, April 06, 01:31 UTC @ Azimuth

The American Mathematical Society is having a meeting here at U. C. Riverside during the weekend of November 4th and 5th, 2017. I’m organizing a session on Applied Category Theory, and I’m looking for people to give talks. The goal is to start a conversation about applications of category theory, not within pure math or […]

The Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer

Thursday, April 06, 01:07 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/brson [link] [comments]

Two Little-Known and Completely Unrelated Facts

Wednesday, April 05, 23:57 UTC @ inessential.com

One. OmniOutliner’s outline view is implemented as CALayers rather than as a view with subviews. (I don’t think I’m giving away a trade secret here.) Two. If you eat fenugreek, your armpits will smell like maple syrup.

You’re Doing It Wrong

Wednesday, April 05, 22:40 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/Manishearth [link] [comments]

iOS, JavaScript, and Object Hierarchies

Wednesday, April 05, 21:53 UTC @ inessential.com

Rob Fahrni: Given x-callback-url and App URL schemes in general it would be extremely cool to use those to create object hierarchies using JavaScript. Why JavaScript? Well, it’s native to iOS and applications can use the runtime.

CocoaConf Near WWDC

Wednesday, April 05, 21:35 UTC @ inessential.com

There are a bunch of things happening near WWDC this year. Me, I’ll be at CocoaConf Next Door. I’m not preparing a talk, but I’ll probably be on a panel. And hanging out. Check out the speakers list, which includes Omni’s own Liz Marley. And a bunch of other people you totally want to see — Manton Reece, Jean MacDonald, Laura Savi

Some Math and Physics Interactions

Wednesday, April 05, 20:12 UTC @ Not Even Wrong

Quanta magazine has a new article about physicists “attacking” the Riemann Hypothesis, based on the publication in PRL of this paper. The only comment from a mathematician evaluating relevance of this to a proof of the Riemann Hypothesis basically says … Continue reading →

/u/nwydo on Rust documentation through .com/.docs domain. .rs domain is restricted.

Wednesday, April 05, 19:58 UTC @ gilded : rust

Ok so I bought and set up http://... with a little nginx server which proxies and rewrites html (although it looks like most links do not include the hostname, so that may be unnecessary and maybe I could just point it to the IP of docs.rs?). Enjoy! PS: I might do TLS as well soon, just need to grab a certificate.

/u/steveklabnik1 on Big thanks to the authors of the second book

Wednesday, April 05, 19:46 UTC @ gilded : rust

agreed 1000000% :D :D :D

/u/carols10cents on Big thanks to the authors of the second book

Wednesday, April 05, 18:56 UTC @ gilded : rust

<3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 Thank you!!! This means a lot to me to hear, and I know it means a lot to /u/steveklabnik1 as well :) <3

Big thanks to the authors of the second book

Wednesday, April 05, 18:43 UTC @ gilded : rust

I just want to thank those that have worked on the second book. I think it makes the language much more accessible. submitted by /u/xaocon [link] [comm

OmniOutliner 5.0 for Mac

Wednesday, April 05, 17:44 UTC @ inessential.com

I’ve been on the OmniOutliner team for over a year now. Though we don’t have positions like junior and senior developer, I enjoy calling myself the junior developer on the Outliner team, since I’m newest. I may be a new developer, but I’m not a new user — I’ve been using the app since the days when OmniOutliner 3 came installed on every Mac. Every time I start a talk, I outline it first. I organize the work I need to do in my side-project apps in OmniOutliner. And — don’t

Build the MVP Canvas

Wednesday, April 05, 13:03 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Paulo Caroli completes the Lean Inception by summarizing all the knowledge gained during the week into the MVP Canvas. As well as summarizing the user-centere

Using AI and science to predict heart failure

Wednesday, April 05, 13:00 UTC @ IBM Blog Research

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death for decades in the United States so it’s no surprise that heart failure rates, which is a specific type of heart disease characterized by when the heart is too weak to pump blood throughout the body, are on the rise. In fact, the number of American […] The post Using AI and science to predict heart failure appeared first on

Too Big NOT to Fail

Wednesday, April 05, 12:09 UTC @ ACM Queue - All Queue Content

Web-scale infrastructure implies LOTS of servers working together, often tens or hundreds of thousands of servers all working toward the same goal. How can the complexity of these environments be managed? How can commonality and simplicity be introduced?

Proving Langs not Regular using Comm Complexity

Tuesday, April 04, 21:38 UTC @ Computational Complexity

(My notes on this are at my course website: here They are notes for my ugrad students so they may be longer and more detailed than you want.) While Teaching Regular langauges in the Formal Languages course I realized Using that { (x,y) : x=y, both of length n} has Communication Complexity \ge n+1 one can easily prove: <

This Week in Rust 176

Tuesday, April 04, 18:47 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/nasa42 [link] [comments]

/u/eeeeeta on Rust documentation through .com/.docs domain. .rs domain is restricted.

Tuesday, April 04, 18:12 UTC @ gilded : rust

You can download the crates yourself, and run cargo doc --open as a workaround.

/u/erickt on Welcome to the Rust Community Blog

Tuesday, April 04, 14:56 UTC @ gilded : rust

Hi! /u/Manishearth and I run the SF meetup. We haven't announced our next one but you can find it here. You can find all the meetups we know about on this list.

QA in Production

Tuesday, April 04, 13:07 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Traditionally, QA focuses on testing the software before release into production to see if it's ready for such release. But Rouan Wilsenach points out that, increasingly, modern QA organizations are also focusing

Welcome to the Rust Community Blog

Tuesday, April 04, 11:57 UTC @ gilded : rust

submitted by /u/fgilcher [link] [comments]

Frontier Diary #1: VM Life

Monday, April 03, 20:44 UTC @ inessential.com

It’s been years since I could build the Frontier kernel — but I finally got it building. It’s really a ’90s Mac app that’s been Carbonized just enough to run on MacOS, but it’s by no means modern: it uses QuickDraw and early Carbon APIs. It’s written entirely in C. I got it building by installing MacOS 10.6.8 Server in VMWare. Installed Xcode 3.2.6. And now, finally, I can build and run it. What is Frontier? Frontier

One Line of Code that Compromises Your Server (Part 2)

Monday, April 03, 13:11 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Now Jack has the session key, he moves on to show how he can use it to gain administrative rights on the application, and further to g

En Magnet: «El día en que la NASA logró que Carrero Blanco tocara la Luna […]»

Monday, April 03, 10:31 UTC @ brucknerite

«Están un ruso, un americano y un español fanfarroneando sobre el programa espacial de cada país. Dice el ruso…» Podría decirse que los deportes de riesgo no son lo mío, si dejamos de lado mi afición cada vez más peligrosa a usar Twitter —no porque me esté radicalizando, sino por las querencias crecientes de la … Continúa leyendo

Analyzing Third Party Libraries

Monday, April 03, 00:00 UTC @ The Syndicate

Many of our engineers are embedded with our clients, working along side our client’s engineering staff as one unit — but still representing MartianCraft and the quality and standards of any of our engineers. Which can be a test for an engineer when it comes to the selection of third party code libraries. As a company our default position is: you are better off never using third party libraries. Of course there are always exceptions to such positions, but this is our core belief and because of

Quick links

Sunday, April 02, 21:35 UTC @ Geeking with Greg

A carefully picked list of some of the tech news I enjoyed recently: So, you know that prototype we showed you? Turns out AI in real world conditions is hard. ([1] [2] [3]) Artificial intelligence expert Yann LeCun says, "Ther

Quantile-quantile plots and powers of 3/2

Sunday, April 02, 20:07 UTC @ John D. Cook

This post serves two purposes. It will empirically explore a question in number theory and demonstrate quantile-quantile (q-q) plots. It will shed light on a question raised in the previous post. And if you’re not familiar with q-q plots, it will serve as an introduction to such plots. The previous post said that for almost all x > […]

Uniform distribution of powers mod 1

Sunday, April 02, 19:12 UTC @ John D. Cook

A few days ago I wrote about how powers of the golden ratio are nearly integers but powers of π are not. This post is similar but takes a little different perspective. Instead of looking at how close powers are to the nearest integers, we’ll look at how close they are to their floor, the largest […]

Book review: Radical Candor

Sunday, April 02, 03:22 UTC @ Geeking with Greg

This just came out, the book Radical Candor by Kim Scott. It's a good read on m

Idris 1.0 Released

Saturday, April 01, 18:53 UTC @ Lambda the Ultimate - Programming Languages Weblog

What do we mean by “1.0”? Idris version 1.0 corresponds to the language as described in Type-Driven Development with Idris, published last week by Manning.

photostream 107

Saturday, April 01, 14:45 UTC @ Martin Fowler

Lake Matheson, New Zealand

William Rowan Hamilton- The Musical!

Saturday, April 01, 13:11 UTC @ Computational Complexity

With the success of Hamilton,the musical on broadway (for all of the songs and the lyrics to them see here- I wonder who would buy the CD since its here for free) Lin-Manuel Miranda looked around for other famous figures he could make a musical about. Per chance I know Lin's college roommates father and I suggested to him, more as a joke, that Lin-Manuel could make a musical about William Rowan Hamilton Well, Lin-Man

The End Of Human Science?

Saturday, April 01, 05:21 UTC @ Gödel’s Lost Letter and P=NP

Could we go the way of telegraph operators? Pixabay source Lofa Polir has sent us some new information that will have widespread ramifications for math and theory and science in general. Today Ken and I wish to comment on this information. Polir is sure that this information is correct. If he is correct the consequences […]

Scaling !!Con

Saturday, April 01, 00:56 UTC @ composition.al

As regular readers of this blog are probably tired of hearing by now, !!Con (“bang bang con”) is a weekend-long conference of ten-minute talks about experiencing computing viscerally, held annually in New York since 2014. I’ve been helping organize !!Con since the beginning, and th